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Temperature. In the shade.

  • 28-06-2017 4:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,193 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Hi, I know that temperature is measured in the shade. So let's say temperature in the shade is 20. What would it be roughly in direct sunlight. How much % more would you add on.

    I don't need an over technical answer. Just high level. Add on 30% maybe?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 14,544 ✭✭✭✭ Supercell


    The air temperature in the shade is exactly the same as out of it.
    How hot the sun feels on your skin out of the shade depends on many things such as wind, moisture, skin colour, body fat and many other things.

    Have a weather station?, why not join the Ireland Weather Network - http://irelandweather.eu/



  • Registered Users Posts: 4,193 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Supercell wrote: »
    The air temperature in the shade is exactly the same as out of it.
    How hot the sun feels on your skin out of the shade depends on many things such as wind, moisture, skin colour, body fat and many other things.


    Ok. Fair enough. But just looking for a rough guide. It will most certainly feel hotter in direct sun than in the shade, just wondering how much % more on a blue sky sunny 20 degree day with 5mph wind in the shade on O Connell street in mid June at 3pm.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19,565 ✭✭✭✭ Rikand


    obi604 wrote: »
    Ok. Fair enough. But just looking for a rough guide. It will most certainly feel hotter in direct sun than in the shade, just wondering how much % more on a blue sky sunny 20 degree day with 5mph wind in the shade on O Connell street in mid June at 3pm.

    I'm going to give you a piece of string and I want you to approximately tell me how much longer it looks if I dangle it from a wooden beam with the lights dimmed as opposed to me stretching it out horizontally between my two hands, holding it with thumb and forefinger on each hand, while sailing across the north pole.
























    Guestimation

    Although your set of conditions might be a little easier than my symposium. I'd go roughly 40% because of all the concrete that would surround you on O'Connell street trapping all that heat in like a furnace. Real feel of somewhere near 27-28 degrees


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,193 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Rikand wrote: »
    I'm going to give you a piece of string and I want you to approximately tell me how much longer it looks if I dangle it from a wooden beam with the lights dimmed as opposed to me stretching it out horizontally between my two hands, holding it with thumb and forefinger on each hand, while sailing across the north pole.
























    Guestimation

    Although your set of conditions might be a little easier than my symposium. I'd go roughly 40% because of all the concrete that would surround you on O'Connell street trapping all that heat in like a furnace. Real feel of somewhere near 27-28 degrees

    The piece of string will look exactly 8.4 cm longer.

    Your guesstimation is good enough for me.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,409 ✭✭✭ Danno


    I think what you're asking here is, how much would a standard thermometer as used by Met Eireann that was exposed to in direct sunlight heat up to on a fine day where the max hits, say 20c in the stevensons screen.

    Last week during the warm spell, at 10am the screen (shade) thermometer was in around 20c. The grass min thermometer, exposed to direct sunlight since 5.05am that morning was already above 25c. I never looked at it more during the day around say 4pm or 5pm when the warmest part of the day usually is, but next time I will. I'd hazard a guess that it gets into the mid-30s.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 4,193 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Danno wrote: »
    I think what you're asking here is, how much would a standard thermometer as used by Met Eireann that was exposed to in direct sunlight heat up to on a fine day where the max hits, say 20c in the stevensons screen.

    Last week during the warm spell, at 10am the screen (shade) thermometer was in around 20c. The grass min thermometer, exposed to direct sunlight since 5.05am that morning was already above 25c. I never looked at it more during the day around say 4pm or 5pm when the warmest part of the day usually is, but next time I will. I'd hazard a guess that it gets into the mid-30s.

    Thank you. Good informative reply.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,193 ✭✭✭ obi604


    Before anyone says it, I know this is not very scientific or a brilliant test or good equipment or not the right height off the ground or not properly shaded etc.

    But just as a rough guide, did this a while ago. One thermometer in the sun and another in the shade

    In Sun = 34.7 c
    In shade = 19.9 c


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