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How to go about becoming a primary school teacher

  • 21-05-2017 5:23pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ Shannon211


    Hiya I'm a sixth year student, just going over my CAO for the change in mind. I know I want to become a primary school teacher but I'm not sure how to go about it. I'm exempted from Irish, so I won't have the required Irish to get into the primary teaching course (unless my exemption exempts me from this too, but as far as I know it just exempts me from needing Irish to get into a college). I'm already aware that I won't be able to teach primary in Ireland and will have to emigrate, I'm just wondering what route should I go about becoming one? Could I do an arts degree here and then do a postgrad type thing elsewhere or a masters in education? Or would I be better off holding off on college for a year, working to get money, and then studying primary teaching in the UK or the US? I'm hoping to get around 500 points in the LC in case that's important!

    I'm sorry if this is in the wrong topic, I'm new to boards and figured since this was about becoming a teacher it could go here? I'm sorry if I'm wrong though!


Comments

  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 4,367 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dory


    Hard to know what's the best route really. I suppose you could save for the year and then go do primary teaching in England. You're correct that the exemption means you don't need it to get into college, but you still need it to be a primary teacher here.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,438 Crazyteacher


    Shannon211 wrote: »
    Hiya I'm a sixth year student, just going over my CAO for the change in mind. I know I want to become a primary school teacher but I'm not sure how to go about it. I'm exempted from Irish, so I won't have the required Irish to get into the primary teaching course (unless my exemption exempts me from this too, but as far as I know it just exempts me from needing Irish to get into a college). I'm already aware that I won't be able to teach primary in Ireland and will have to emigrate, I'm just wondering what route should I go about becoming one? Could I do an arts degree here and then do a postgrad type thing elsewhere or a masters in education? Or would I be better off holding off on college for a year, working to get money, and then studying primary teaching in the UK or the US? I'm hoping to get around 500 points in the LC in case that's important!

    I'm sorry if this is in the wrong topic, I'm new to boards and figured since this was about becoming a teacher it could go here? I'm sorry if I'm wrong though!

    Looks like if you do get qualified in the U.K. you would be limited at teaching over here. Did you ever study Irish? I know a guy who did ordinary level Irish and went to the UK. When he came back he had to take classes and sit an Irish exam to be a fully registered teacher. He had to work hard but anything is possible.

    Have a look at the PGCE primary options in Northern Ireland too. Did you apply to UCAS?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,052 ✭✭✭ mtoutlemonde


    Looks like if you do get qualified in the U.K. you would be limited at teaching over here. Did you ever study Irish? I know a guy who did ordinary level Irish and went to the UK. When he came back he had to take classes and sit an Irish exam to be a fully registered teacher. He had to work hard but anything is possible.

    Have a look at the PGCE primary options in Northern Ireland too. Did you apply to UCAS?

    That wouldn't be fair on the students the OP would have to teach Irish to. Rules are there for a reason and have to be adhered to. OP would you not consider secondary?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,438 Crazyteacher


    How is that unfair if someone learns Irish and takes the correct exam to ensure they are fully qualified to teach it ? Many people have taken this route and it's had no detrimental effect on students.

    http://www.education.ie/en/Education-Staff/Information/-New-Teachers/Irish-Language-Requirement-Primary-Teachers.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,052 ✭✭✭ mtoutlemonde


    How is that unfair if someone learns Irish and takes the correct exam to ensure they are fully qualified to teach it ? Many people have taken this route and it's had no detrimental effect on students.

    http://www.education.ie/en/Education-Staff/Information/-New-Teachers/Irish-Language-Requirement-Primary-Teachers.html

    Yes re-reading your post - didn't read it properly, I agree.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ Shannon211


    Looks like if you do get qualified in the U.K. you would be limited at teaching over here. Did you ever study Irish? I know a guy who did ordinary level Irish and went to the UK. When he came back he had to take classes and sit an Irish exam to be a fully registered teacher. He had to work hard but anything is possible.

    Have a look at the PGCE primary options in Northern Ireland too. Did you apply to UCAS?
    Sorry for getting back to you so late, I've been graduating this week so it's been hectic! Yeah I think I'd be okay with emigrating to the UK, not ideal, but I'm still finalising whether I'd want to do primary or secondary! And no I haven't, I moved here when I was 12 so I've never studied it, I definitely could pick it up if I worked very very hard and intensively, since I'm good at languages, but I'm not sure I could balance that on top of a college course. Also that's very impressive of the guy you know!! And yeah I've looked into PGCE thank you! I didn't apply to ucas since I definitely wouldn't have the money to go to college in the UK next year, if I were to go that route it'd be a year out to save up first.. Thank you for the reply! :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ Shannon211


    That wouldn't be fair on the students the OP would have to teach Irish to. Rules are there for a reason and have to be adhered to. OP would you not consider secondary?
    I know you misread the post you quoted, but that is a fear of mine that my teaching of Irish wouldn't be at the best standard! Also I am actually considering secondary teaching, I'm thinking it may even be better for me since I am passionate about my favourite subjects and would love to teach them


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,052 ✭✭✭ mtoutlemonde


    Shannon211 wrote: »
    I know you misread the post you quoted, but that is a fear of mine that my teaching of Irish wouldn't be at the best standard! Also I am actually considering secondary teaching, I'm thinking it may even be better for me since I am passionate about my favourite subjects and would love to teach them

    I think it would be your best option. Study the subjects you are passionate about in university, do the dip and more importantly you can teach in Ireland. Best of luck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ Shannon211


    I think it would be your best option. Study the subjects you are passionate about in university, do the dip and more importantly you can teach in Ireland. Best of luck.
    Thank you so much!


  • Registered Users Posts: 77 ✭✭✭ Triona00


    Hi

    How hard is it to get a job as a primary teacher?
    Do you have to be subbing for a certain amount of years first?

    Also with the h.dip how much does that cost?


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  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,345 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Primary teachers don’t do a h. Dip, they do a probationary year , which doesn’t cost you in fees .


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