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vista is over - so I have to upgrade old laptop

  • 18-04-2017 10:50pm
    #1
    Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 1,139 artieanna


    Hi I have to upgrade my laptop from Vista (I have avoided it for so long) -
    I have a couple of questions as I don't want to kill it in the process!
    This is my laptop http://www.toshiba.ie/discontinued-products/satellite-l350-20g/

    What is the newest version of windows can I upgrade to, that she can handle?
    Also if I remove all photos etc off the hard drive and do a factory reset will this help to speed her up a bit - Yes I know she's old - but I'm very fond of her and I'm very broke :rolleyes:

    Anything else I can do to rev her up and help her survive another while?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 4,689 ✭✭✭ PropJoe10


    artieanna wrote: »
    Hi I have to upgrade my laptop from Vista (I have avoided it for so long) -
    I have a couple of questions as I don't want to kill it in the process!
    This is my laptop http://www.toshiba.ie/discontinued-products/satellite-l350-20g/

    What is the newest version of windows can I upgrade to, that she can handle?
    Also if I remove all photos etc off the hard drive and do a factory reset will this help to speed her up a bit - Yes I know she's old - but I'm very fond of her and I'm very broke :rolleyes:

    Anything else I can do to rev her up and help her survive another while?

    That processor is fairly nasty, so its likely that you won't have a great experience with any modern Windows OS - I'd suggest 10 over 7, though. It runs a bit lighter on resources, in my experience.

    Would you be prepared to move to Linux? Something like Ubuntu MATE edition would run nicely on that.

    https://ubuntu-mate.org


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 88,685 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    artieanna wrote: »
    What is the newest version of windows can I upgrade to, that she can handle?
    realistically none.

    Microsoft never offered a free upgrade from Vista to anything later. So you would have to buy a transferable licence, and they ain't cheap.



    You've a 2008 CPU and Microsoft have more or less stopped supporting old processors. :mad:
    Unless you workaround https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/04/19/chap_fixes_microsofts_windows_7_and_8_update_block_on_new_cpus/

    Your CPU predates the 1st Gen Intel Core so you are many generations behind :(
    https://blogs.windows.com/business/2016/08/11/updates-to-silicon-support-policy-for-windows/
    6th Gen Intel Core devices on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 will be supported with all applicable security updates until the end of support for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.
    ...
    As previously communicated earlier this year, future silicon platforms including Intel’s upcoming 7th Gen Intel Core (Kaby Lake) processor family and AMD’s 7th generation processors (e.g. Bristol Ridge) will only be supported on Windows 10, and all future silicon releases will require the latest release of Windows 10.

    BTW Backup your hard drive because of it's age.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,562 ✭✭✭ Xterminator


    Hi OP

    Echoing the above comments, you are not going to get an acceptable user performance from win10 on this laptop, and its not free.

    so i would suggest your only other option would be to backup your files, then install linux. with an OS like linux mint, it works a lot like windows the interface is familiar and most stuff works out of the box, so there doesn't tend to be the need to install drivers etc.

    and because its free - it wont cost you to try.

    https://linuxmint.com/download.php


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,550 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    Hi OP

    Echoing the above comments, you are not going to get an acceptable user performance from win10 on this laptop, and its not free.

    so i would suggest your only other option would be to backup your files, then install linux. with an OS like linux mint, it works a lot like windows the interface is familiar and most stuff works out of the box, so there doesn't tend to be the need to install drivers etc.

    and because its free - it wont cost you to try.

    https://linuxmint.com/download.php

    Mint is definitely worth a try, not least because there is a good user-friendly manual available for it.

    OP, if you want to try it you can burn a dvd of the setup program for Mint, boot from that and try it out in "live" mode without installing anything or changing your windows installation. It would give you an idea of what to expect.

    I would also echo the advice to back up your files to a different location because your laptop's disk is getting on a bit, which increases the chances of it failing soon.


  • Registered Users Posts: 546 fleet


    Lads, you can't just go recommending Linux Mint to a person who's been chugging along on Vista for a decade. I love Linux, but the number of hurdles they'll encounter will be immense, from incompatibilities, to security, to different interfaces, drivers for Windows only printers, the list goes on.

    If they were a techie then they'd probably have upgraded since a Nokia 8850 was the phone to have.

    Vista isn't much lighter on a processor than Windows 10, after all Win10 is designed to work on tablets with awful processors. Assuming the OPs processor can support it then I'd vote a 32bit version of Windows 10 AND an upgrade to an SSD drive.

    A better option would of course be spending €500 on a decent modern machine. Finance depending.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 546 fleet


    and yes, like the others: back up your files, today.
    Stick them on the cloud if you can't afford an external drive.
    Google Drive / OneDrive etc.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,550 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    fleet wrote: »
    Lads, you can't just go recommending Linux Mint to a person who's been chugging along on Vista for a decade. I love Linux, but the number of hurdles they'll encounter will be immense, from incompatibilities, to security, to different interfaces, drivers for Windows only printers, the list goes on.

    If they were a techie then they'd probably have upgraded since a Nokia 8850 was the phone to have.

    Vista isn't much lighter on a processor than Windows 10, after all Win10 is designed to work on tablets with awful processors. Assuming the OPs processor can support it then I'd vote a 32bit version of Windows 10 AND an upgrade to an SSD drive.

    A better option would of course be spending €500 on a decent modern machine. Finance depending.

    I have set up 70 year olds with a fresh Linux Mint install and a printed copy of the manual and they've been grand. For mostly browser-based stuff it's an easy transition, though you're right that it can be a bit more of a fiddle if you have software you expect/need to be able to use - that'd be why I suggested trying the Live Disc mode before installing :)

    TBH, the transition from Vista to 10 would be enough of a shock to the system that there's going to have to be a learning experience one way or another, so may as well at least mention the one that's available for €0 so the OP can decide for themselves.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,689 ✭✭✭ PropJoe10


    fleet wrote: »
    Lads, you can't just go recommending Linux Mint to a person who's been chugging along on Vista for a decade. I love Linux, but the number of hurdles they'll encounter will be immense, from incompatibilities, to security, to different interfaces, drivers for Windows only printers, the list goes on.

    If they were a techie then they'd probably have upgraded since a Nokia 8850 was the phone to have.

    Vista isn't much lighter on a processor than Windows 10, after all Win10 is designed to work on tablets with awful processors. Assuming the OPs processor can support it then I'd vote a 32bit version of Windows 10 AND an upgrade to an SSD drive.

    A better option would of course be spending €500 on a decent modern machine. Finance depending.

    I've got my parents (in their 60s) running Linux Mint without any issues. Considering the age of the OP's laptop, Mint is a very valid suggestion in my book. I would not like to be running Windows 10 on that type of machine.

    Also - you mentioned security and incompatibility issues. It's been about two years since I've had to manually look for a Linux kernel module for a piece of hardware - most things work out of the box now in kernel version 4.x. Never had any issues with security either. Not sure what you're on about at all, to be honest.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 88,685 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Capt'n Midnight


    PropJoe10 wrote: »
    Also - you mentioned security and incompatibility issues. It's been about two years since I've had to manually look for a Linux kernel module for a piece of hardware - most things work out of the box now in kernel version 4.x. Never had any issues with security either. Not sure what you're on about at all, to be honest.
    Linux hardware support issues are generally with new or exotic hardware. An old Toshiba laptop is neither.

    By comparison I've posted above about Microsoft trying to ditch support for older processors, a lot of which are more powerful than you'd get in entry level laptops.

    As for security you have a lot less with very old windows software.

    But if you want to go down the windows route you will need a legit licence and for the cost of that you could probably get a second hand laptop with a newer OS.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    Its just too old that machine.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,826 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Sam Russell


    I am in a similar position.

    I have an HP laptop - G70 Notebook. I think it dates from Nov 2008.

    Proc: 2.00 GHz Intel Core2 64k pcache 2048 scache
    64 bit ready, Nor Hyper threaded

    Mem 3 GB, Bus clock 800 MHz

    HDD 160 Gbyte

    Now I'd like to go Win 10, but Linux might suit.

    Any advice?


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,689 ✭✭✭ PropJoe10


    I am in a similar position.

    I have an HP laptop - G70 Notebook. I think it dates from Nov 2008.

    Proc: 2.00 GHz Intel Core2 64k pcache 2048 scache
    64 bit ready, Nor Hyper threaded

    Mem 3 GB, Bus clock 800 MHz

    HDD 160 Gbyte

    Now I'd like to go Win 10, but Linux might suit.

    Any advice?

    I have Windows 10 running on an Intel Core2 machine with an SSD and it works fine. An SSD would give a serious boost to that machine.

    if you prefer Linux, then check out something like Linux Mint Cinnamon. Can't go wrong.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,423 ✭✭✭ ressem


    I'd second PropJoe. A D630 Dell with 2.1 GHz core 2 duo and SSD is perfectly decent at the moment with windows 10 pro.

    Alternatively you can get a 4-5 year old refurbished i3 laptop for about 140 quid and Windows 10 home preinstalled by the refurb company.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    I upped my C2D from a 1.5 to a 2.5Ghz and it flies now. SSD and Windows 8.1. 2GB of Ram but doesn't seem to be a problem. Had issues with the WiFi AC card on Windows 10 so I went back to Windows 8.1. But it worked fine on W10 otherwise. No speed problems at all. Vista was always slow on it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,689 ✭✭✭ PropJoe10


    Dont get me wrong, I wouldn't run Windows voluntarily in a fit. But if folks prefer to stick with Windows, then you can make a fairly decent Windows machine out of that without too much expense at all! Anything with a half-decent dual core processor can run Windows 10 fairly comfortably.

    Single core Pentium 4, for example - forget it.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    I'd say the minimum is 2Ghz ish Core2Duo. The 1.5 I had was too slow. The 2.0 ok but it has a gfx card which helps.

    I've never rally liked Linux. I run it for a while but always go back to Windows.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22,676 ✭✭✭✭ beauf


    ressem wrote: »
    I'd second PropJoe. A D630 Dell with 2.1 GHz core 2 duo and SSD is perfectly decent at the moment with windows 10 pro.

    Alternatively you can get a 4-5 year old refurbished i3 laptop for about 140 quid and Windows 10 home preinstalled by the refurb company.

    We've and i3 with a SSD its a significantly nicer experience. The Core2Duo will still work ok though.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 16,826 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Sam Russell


    I think if I had a free upgrade to Win 10, then that is certainly the way I would go.

    Not sure about Linux - is it a steep learning curve?

    I currently use Outlook for email, and MS Office (V 7) for word and Excel.

    I run Win 10 on an HP desktop.
    Intel core i5 4440 @ 3.1 GHz.
    256 kb P cache 1024 S cache 6144 kbytes tertiary cache
    64 bit
    multi core (4 total) Not hyper threaded.
    Bus clock 100 mhz. 8192 mbytes of DIMM

    The laptop would not be my main machine at all, so I am not sure I want to put a lot of effort in learning Linux and all that entails.


  • Moderators, Arts Moderators, Regional Abroad Moderators Posts: 10,550 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Fysh


    I think if I had a free upgrade to Win 10, then that is certainly the way I would go.

    Not sure about Linux - is it a steep learning curve?

    I currently use Outlook for email, and MS Office (V 7) for word and Excel.

    I run Win 10 on an HP desktop.
    Intel core i5 4440 @ 3.1 GHz.
    256 kb P cache 1024 S cache 6144 kbytes tertiary cache
    64 bit
    multi core (4 total) Not hyper threaded.
    Bus clock 100 mhz. 8192 mbytes of DIMM

    The laptop would not be my main machine at all, so I am not sure I want to put a lot of effort in learning Linux and all that entails.

    LibreOffice would probably be preinstalled and cover you for word and excel type use (though if you're an Advanced Excel Artist you will probably hit issues), your main issue would be the lack of Outlook. If you have PSTs or use addons for outlook you'll need to loom into the migration. There are plenty of mail clients for linux though, I usually​ use Thunderbird myself.

    Best bet is to download and burn a liveCd, probably of Linux Mint if you're new. You boot from it and can try it out without having made any permanent changes to your laptop. If you decide you like it, you can install it - if not, you just shut down and take out the CD and you're back to having Windows as before.


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