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Recycling Plastic Bottles for Cash

  • 13-02-2017 10:42pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 10,712 ✭✭✭✭ Andy From Sligo


    wife has just returned from Hamburg and said there were machines in the supermarkets there where you can put in plastic bottles (drinks bottles/water bottles etc) and it crushed them and give you 25cents per bottle. Some bloke took a load in and got 4euro back!

    - why arent we at that stage or does someone know if it is done in Ireland already?.

    - she said there were machine for glass bottles too and give you money back.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 2,273 ✭✭✭ Cheshire Cat


    That's because you pay a deposit for the bottles when you buy them. It's to "encourage" people to return them for recycling because they lose the money otherwise.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Container_deposit_legislation

    According to the Wikipedia article an Irish company was one of the first to use a system like that (in 1799!) Must have fallen out of fashion here ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,852 ✭✭✭✭ _Brian


    That's because you pay a deposit for the bottles when you buy them. It's to "encourage" people to return them for recycling because they lose the money otherwise.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Container_deposit_legislation

    According to the Wikipedia article an Irish company was one of the first to use a system like that (in 1799!) Must have fallen out of fashion here ;)

    I'm not that old (well a bit) but I well remember a deposit and return on soft drinks bottles here in Ireland.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,273 ✭✭✭ Cheshire Cat


    I moved to Ireland 12 years ago and haven't come across a deposit system. Must have been before "my time".
    There wouldn't be any harm in reintroducing the system!


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,978 ✭✭✭ two wheels good


    There are many countries that use a refundable deposit scheme - and many states in the USA do also. (Even Texas wanted to introduce it I read in that link)

    Anyone want to join me on a campaign to try to have it introduced here in Ireland?

    Some years ago when packaging legislation and Repak was under review I wrote to the minister (Phil Hogan, remember him?) to advocate the deposit system but got fobbed-off with a spoofer's response.

    The amount of drinks containers picked up in litter is enormous. Soon, with new incinerators planned, what do you think they'll be burning?

    BTW The long-ago bottle deposit scheme was a brewery/drinks company scheme not govt. legislated, and applied to glass bottles only. Plastic bottles were rare back then, maybe newly introduced for milk bottles.


  • Registered Users Posts: 952 hytrogen


    Anyone want to join me on a campaign to try to have it introduced here in Ireland? Some years ago when packaging legislation and Repak was under review I wrote to the minister (Phil Hogan, remember him?) to advocate the deposit system but got fobbed-off with a spoofer's response.

    I'll definitely vote for that!
    Also I think a spate of "bottling people" back in the 80's & 90's tapped it on the head, excuse the pun, to sell glass packaged soft drinks here as so many kids were at it.
    I'm very conscientious about my packaging now, especially from being at sea and seeing the amount of plastics floating around the world, whales and dolphins washing ashore with plastic in their guts, turtles with plastic nets around their neck etc. We've all seen it to some degree. Also from being over in Hamburg last year I'm definitely in favour of this, the empowerment it gave to the homeless, jobless I never once was approached for money, only my beer bottle when I was outside the pub. Great incentive to give people hope and prosperity and they were so polite!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 635 ✭✭✭ rgfuller


    This has been discussed/proposed in the UK in recent years - however:- there are issues, namely it would be unlikely to change behavior, has a high cost and adds minor inconvenience for current recycling processes.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/15/plastic-bottle-tax-unlikely-government-rejects-deposit-scheme/
    &
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/oct/01/bottle-deposit-scheme-costly-counterproductive


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,978 ✭✭✭ two wheels good


    rgfuller wrote: »
    This has been discussed/proposed in the UK in recent years - however:- there are issues, namely it would be unlikely to change behavior, has a high cost and adds minor inconvenience for current recycling processes.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/15/plastic-bottle-tax-unlikely-government-rejects-deposit-scheme/
    &
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/oct/01/bottle-deposit-scheme-costly-counterproductive

    I think it would change behaviour significantly and promptly. It works elsewhere, no reason it wouldn't work here - as long as there was good coverage of locations\machines to support it.

    I'm more surprised the UK govt. considered the issue than its rejection. The UK was very slow to adopt a trivial plastic bag tax. Corporations have a lot of influence e.g. rejection of the sugar tax also.
    The excuse of "being careful about punishing those who are already doing the right thing" is very flimsy.

    The Guardian article:
    The author "Jane Bickerstaffe is the director of The Industry Council for Packaging and the Environment." So it's a case of .."she would say that, wouldn't she."

    The readers' comments below the line are much more informative. e.g.
    Jane Bickerstaffe, director at the Industry Council for Packaging and the Environment (Incpen), even claims packaging aided the emancipation of women.
    "In the 1930s women spent on average three hours a day shopping for, and preparing, food. Now, if they choose to get a ready meal delivered, and one that is in microwaveable packaging, it's possible to do it all in a few minutes."
    Some PR people have such a brass neck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,712 ✭✭✭✭ Andy From Sligo


    Watching Sky News Today and I think there could be a pilot scheme run soon in Scotland to see money back on recycling Coke bottles:

    http://news.sky.com/story/coca-cola-in-u-turn-over-plastic-bottle-deposit-scheme-10777393


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,978 ✭✭✭ two wheels good


    Watching Sky News Today and I think there could be a pilot scheme run soon in Scotland to see money back on recycling Coke bottles:

    http://news.sky.com/story/coca-cola-in-u-turn-over-plastic-bottle-deposit-scheme-10777393

    Good news. I wondered if Edinburgh might take a different view to Westminster. They'll be popping north of the border with car boots full of empties.
    I read a comment in a earlier link about one state in USA with the refund scheme where redemption was greater 100%. Suggesting residents in the neighbouring state without the scheme were crossing state lines. Maybe not a desireable consequence.

    In Ireland I think the only serious problem with introducing the scheme would be upsetting the economics of existing recycling operations. In the UK this may well be easier to overcome where refuse and recycling collection is still council run.

    [Edit]
    Just reading the article now. According to Coca Cola - no less!....
    "We've also been talking to and listening to our consumers and know two thirds (63%) of them support the introduction of a deposit return system in the UK, and half (51%) say they'd be more likely to recycle as a result.

    From our experience elsewhere in Europe, we know that deposit schemes can work if they are developed as part of an overall strategy on the circular economy, in collaboration with all industry stakeholders.

    We are open to exploring any well-thought-through initiative that has the potential to increase recycling and reduce litter."

    I'll be mentioning that in my letter to the minister.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 techignorance!


    Good news. I wondered if Edinburgh might take a different view to Westminster. They'll be popping north of the border with car boots full of empties.
    I read a comment in a earlier link about one state in USA with the refund scheme where redemption was greater 100%. Suggesting residents in the neighbouring state without the scheme were crossing state lines. Maybe not a desireable consequence.

    In Ireland I think the only serious problem with introducing the scheme would be upsetting the economics of existing recycling operations. In the UK this may well be easier to overcome where refuse and recycling collection is still council run.

    [Edit]
    Just reading the article now. According to Coca Cola - no less!....
    "We've also been talking to and listening to our consumers and know two thirds (63%) of them support the introduction of a deposit return system in the UK, and half (51%) say they'd be more likely to recycle as a result.

    From our experience elsewhere in Europe, we know that deposit schemes can work if they are developed as part of an overall strategy on the circular economy, in collaboration with all industry stakeholders.

    We are open to exploring any well-thought-through initiative that has the potential to increase recycling and reduce litter."

    I'll be mentioning that in my letter to the minister.

    I think it would also be worth sending the letter to Minister Coveney as he has mentioned the need to act on the marine little epidemic a few times so he may be open to this.

    Maybe government could reach out to Coca Cola as a starting point since they are open to doing something.

    Yes there are challenges as with any new initiative like this but I agree that it would have a significant change on behaviour just as the plastic bag levy did.

    I'm sure there is an Irish campaign already out there that we could support and maybe even start a petition or share a letter template to send to Ministers asking them to take action...

    Looks like I have a bit of research to do! 😉


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,978 ✭✭✭ two wheels good


    I think it would also be worth sending the letter to Minister Coveney as he has mentioned the need to act on the marine little epidemic a few times so he may be open to this.

    Maybe government could reach out to Coca Cola as a starting point since they are open to doing something.

    Yes there are challenges as with any new initiative like this but I agree that it would have a significant change on behaviour just as the plastic bag levy did.

    I'm sure there is an Irish campaign already out there that we could support and maybe even start a petition or share a letter template to send to Ministers asking them to take action...

    Looks like I have a bit of research to do! 😉

    Yes, Mr Coveney would be an obvious target. New incinerator proposed in his constituency, he is my TD, potential future leader ...
    But I remember he was the Minister of Ag.who delayed acting on the use neonicotinoids despite bans elsewhere.

    I saw part of a report on Sky News over the weekend about the proposals in the UK. It is topical, so maybe a good time to act. I've been promising myself to write a few letters for ages. Time for action instead of online outrage.

    Any other suggestions welcome - for letter recipients, arguments to present, minsters to door-step, offices to absail, executives to kidnap etc ?


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 59,782 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    The deposit needs to be rather high to make sure people actually bother (the 50 ore one in Denmark is too low for a tourist, even one addicted to caffeine, to seek out how to do it - left them stacked in my hotel room for the cleaners if they wanted to); but also low enough to prevent actual theft of materials as can happen elsewhere - and did happen here with the old bottle return system where kids would climb in to the yards of shops to steal empties and re-return them!

    It can also cause littering issues as people dig through publc bins/tear open waste sacks to look for them - saw this in Oregon. When I was in Oregon I did do it - the empties after a party added up to a few dollars.

    I would wonder if there's any studies to see if it has a negative affect on the viability of kerbside glass collections - which I know are rare here anyway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 432 ✭✭ Stevolende


    I've been wondering about how to recycle things like squash bottles since all my rubbish is going to landfill. I apparently have no control over who handles my waste, in as much as the landlord seems to control everything for the houses they own. I have a communal bin set up which consists of several skip like containers that all go to landfill including food waste and potential recyclables.

    I would like to find somewhere that I could drop things off including plastic containers, cardboard, food etc. Missing the old system where most of my rubbish was going into my own recycling bin or green compost one.
    Feeling taht I can't be alone in being stuck with a waste set up controlled by a landlord. One designed to serve a number of households and ignoring the greener aspects of waste disposal.

    I live in Galway.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,161 ✭✭✭ the_pen_turner


    I think this shows how bad we are in the country.

    In Sweden they have these machines in every shop. Thee is almost no extra effort to use it. Pop the bottle in press next it finish and it takes the next bottle or prints a voucher. The shop then scans the voucher and uses it like cash.
    I would rather have a card where the credit built up.

    This cou try is a disgrace. Why can't we have a good recycling center in every village and town in the country. Integrate it with the local council and gas scheme so that there is always someone there during the day to you are in electrical and recycling.


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