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Computer Science?

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  • 28-08-2016 4:43pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2


    This is my first post on here so if its in the wrong place or anything, feel free to move it.

    I'm going into sixth this year and I'm considering computer science for college, however, I am concerned that I wont be able for it seeing as it is usually seen as a very hard course and of course the high dropout rate. I've done some basic coding on codeacademy and khanacademy and I really like it but my problem is im not that great at maths. I average about a C in higher level maths so Im wondering if the maths is much harder in this course than what you do in higher level fro leaving cert. Also at the moment im considering Trinity and DCU as I want to stay in Dublin, which university would you say is better for computer science?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 90 ✭✭everesteduc


    Here's a guy on the TCD forum commenting about the course although maths is not addressed http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2057639301


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 691 ✭✭✭legocrazy505


    To address the maths, honestly, with Comp Sci you should be capable of it. If you want to be double sure you could go to the open days and ask there or send an email to the course director of the course you want to do to. I went along to UL open nights in TY and they addressed your kind of questions during those events.

    To be honest the dropout rate is mainly from people who don't understand what they are getting themselves into. Many people make assumptions about computer related courses "ah shur i'll be making FIFA in no time!" for example.

    Any STEM course is a tough course but follow what you want to do, put in the graft and 9 times out of 10 you'll come out of it happy.

    NB: Personally have no experience with the course, only entering UL doing Maths & Physics next week. :P


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,434 ✭✭✭VG31


    To be honest the dropout rate is mainly from people who don't understand what they are getting themselves into. Many people make assumptions about computer related courses "ah shur i'll be making FIFA in no time!" for example.

    Although I have not studied computer science (yet anyway), anyone I've ever asked who either did or knows someone who did CS, about the high dropout rates in CS courses has always said that some people think that since it's computers it's just gaming. Many people underestimate the amount of and level of maths required.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,077 ✭✭✭percy212


    The math element of a CS degree is nothing like secondary school math. Its more interesting, and if you practice, it's easier! Don't let that put you off in any way. Most people drop out because they can't handle the programming assignments.


  • Registered Users Posts: 41 Vilas


    I'll be starting Computer Applications @DCU in a couple weeks time and have so done a lot of research about it. Don't worry about the maths, a C at higher level is more than enough. I've contacted someone who done OL for their LC and got one fine with the course. I got a B2 myself in OL so I'm not really worried about the maths aspect of it. It's great that you've tried coding and actually liked it. That's the biggest factor to consider when picking a course to study. If you enjoy something, then you are more than likely excel at it. As others have answered, the large drop out rates are because people unlike you, didn't try coding and had no idea what it would be like as all they heard was that you make big money once you graduate (and you do). If you've got any more questions let me know, I've interrogated several CS students!


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,482 ✭✭✭Hollister11


    I got a OL c2 in maths, and I'm a decent programmer. I'm entering third year of a CS degree.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,148 ✭✭✭punk_one82


    OP, don't worry about the maths. A C at higher level is more than enough. I did ordinary maths for the leaving cert and had no problem. Completed Computer Applications in DCU with an honours degree. The maths in computer science is interesting and challenging. Pay attention to lecturers and practice and you'll be okay. I'd put the high dropout rate in CS courses mostly down to people not knowing what they're getting themselves into in terms of programming and computer science theory. The fact that you've already done some programming before going into college will stand to you if you know you already enjoy it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 107 ✭✭MWick94


    I did first year of CS in TCD before switching to CSB, and in Trinity there is some maths involved throughout. There are two maths modules in first year, which are honestly not too difficult but one of the lecturers is awful so it makes it harder than it should be.

    The main reasons people drop from the course are that they didn't put enough effort into learning programming throughout the year or the course wasn't their first choice/they thought it would involve using computer programs rather than writing them haha.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,567 ✭✭✭daveharnett


    joro4 wrote: »
    I'm going into sixth this year and I'm considering computer science for college, however, I am concerned that I wont be able for it seeing as it is usually seen as a very hard course and of course the high dropout rate.
    Id see it as selective rather than hard. If your brain is wired for programming, then it's engaging which makes it easy/fun to practice. If not, then the programming elements of the course are going to be a real pain.

    Some electives (signal processing, algorithms, graphics, statistics) might test your maths background a bit, but for the core stuff you'd be fine.

    If it doesn't 'click' in first year, don't try to grind it out for three more years. Transfer to a different course, or (if your course supports it) you can use your elective subjects to find a non-programming niche. I know some terrific analysts, testers, project managers, and scrum masters who were never into coding.


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