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Temp measurement

  • 28-06-2016 10:45am
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,943 ✭✭✭ from_atozinc


    Hello,

    In regard to temp measurement, I think that it's always measure in the shade, is this correct ?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,715 ✭✭✭ Bsal


    That is correct.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,943 ✭✭✭ from_atozinc


    Bsal wrote: »
    That is correct.

    Thanks. So is there a rough guide on what the temperature in direct sun is based on the temperature in the shade.

    e.g. If it's 30 in the shade, would that be 40 in the direct sun, 20 in the shade, 30 in direct sun etc.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,943 ✭✭✭ from_atozinc


    Bump


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,943 ✭✭✭ from_atozinc


    Anyone on this at all ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,665 ✭✭✭✭ JCX BXC


    Well.... You put the temperature in the shade so that the sun doesn't heat up the material on it, not because the temperature is actually lower.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 2,943 ✭✭✭ from_atozinc


    Carnacalla wrote: »
    Well.... You put the temperature in the shade so that the sun doesn't heat up the material on it, not because the temperature is actually lower.

    Wha ?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,728 ✭✭✭ martinsvi


    there is no direct correlation as we don't know how much energy is coming from the sun and hitting the thermometer. For instance on a humid day with haze you could have 20°C in shade and some 30°C in direct sun light. Take the haze away and you might have temperatures above 40°C. There are countless of factors that impact this - sun azimuth, elevation, humidity, wind, dry particles (dust) to name a few


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