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Moving back to Ireland from Sweden

  • 22-11-2015 10:35am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Cicilulu


    We are an Irish Swedish family. I'm from Dublin and my husband is a Swede. We have two small children.

    If we return to Ireland I think I would prefer to live outside of Dublin so we could have more space in our home/garden. My question is about how clannish are people outside of the larger cities such as Dublin, Cork, Galway, Waterford? Does it vary from town to town or is it purely about population size? How welcome would Dubliners and Swedes be in smaller communities? Should we stick to larger cities/towns? We are non-religious, is that relevant in today's Ireland?

    It's been 10 years since I lived in Ireland so I am quite out of touch. Any tips on where we should considering buying a home would be welcome. Also open to hearing suggestions of good areas to raise children in Ireland.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 78,144 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Realise that the population has grown by 50% in the last 45 years and that diversity has increased hugely.
    Cicilulu wrote: »
    My question is about how clannish are people outside of the larger cities such as Dublin, Cork, Galway, Waterford?
    Mileage will vary. Some people will adopt a 'you're a blow-in' attitude, others won't. Make yourself part of the community and they can hardly complain.
    Does it vary from town to town or is it purely about population size?
    Generally, the larger the town, the lesser the effect.
    How welcome would Dubliners and Swedes be in smaller communities?
    Mileage varies, but that doesn't stop anyone.
    Should we stick to larger cities/towns?
    Not necessarily, but realise that if you want a choice of services - schools, doctor, dentist, shops, entertainment, etc.- then the bigger the population, the more likely you are to have that variety.
    We are non-religious, is that relevant in today's Ireland?
    Not particularly relevant.
    Also open to hearing suggestions of good areas to raise children in Ireland.
    School capacity is at a critical level in certain locations, it's something to check out. Similarly, look what for what after-school activities are available.


  • Registered Users Posts: 17,365 ✭✭✭✭ Maryanne84


    It is up to yourself and your family to integrate into your chosen community. Starting with your childrens schools. Join the Parents Associations and offer your services, voice and talents. Being non religious won't be a problem. It's much more common nowadays. Join local sporting clubs, athletics, GAA, soccer, rugby, keep fit of any sort! Join local community councils, Tidy Towns, if you live in a town, Neighbourhood committees if you live in a large estate. Meals On Wheels is another option. As is Guides, Scouts, Youth Club leaders, Pony Clubs, etc... The possibilities are endless
    Now, don't join all at once!!! Start with one that appeals to you and take it from there.
    Personally, County Tipperary is a great spot. It's only a couple of hours from Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Waterford, etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,919 ✭✭✭ dori_dormer


    The only way being non religious will affect you is the children's schools. In dublin and surrounding areas their is an issue with school places. Because over 90% of schools are Catholic, not having a baptismal certificate may put you at the bottom of the list. If the school is over subscribed, your children won't get a place. It's not every school in every town but depending on where you choose to settle it could be an issue.

    Are your jobs not location dependant? Commuting to work can be an issue and have an effect on where you choose to live


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Cicilulu


    Thanks for the replies and info. Good points and suggestions. Does anyone know how I can find out which areas have schools that are full? Should I contact the department of education or is that info available online anywhere?


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 51,489 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Stheno


    Do you know where you will be working yet?

    That's the first thing you need to consider before deciding where to live imo.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,919 ✭✭✭ dori_dormer


    Cicilulu wrote: »
    Thanks for the replies and info. Good points and suggestions. Does anyone know how I can find out which areas have schools that are full? Should I contact the department of education or is that info available online anywhere?

    I think the only way of finding out is ringing the individual schools and asking if they'd have space for your child


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭ Cicilulu


    We can work from home so our location isn't so important from that perspective.
    I found some statistics on class size on the Department of Education's website but I guess calling individual schools makes sense. Thanks again.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,919 ✭✭✭ dori_dormer


    What class would your children be going into? It really depends on the school and if they have space in that particular class.

    Personally I wouldn't go too rural. There'll be less activities available for the kids other than gaa. Youll have to drive the kids everywhere they want to go. Every time they want to see their friends it's a drive.

    I'd pick a nice suburb of a city, hi to suppose it depends on your budget too


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,882 Saipanne


    Cicilulu wrote: »
    We are an Irish Swedish family. I'm from Dublin and my husband is a Swede. We have two small children.

    If we return to Ireland I think I would prefer to live outside of Dublin so we could have more space in our home/garden. My question is about how clannish are people outside of the larger cities such as Dublin, Cork, Galway, Waterford? Does it vary from town to town or is it purely about population size? How welcome would Dubliners and Swedes be in smaller communities? Should we stick to larger cities/towns? We are non-religious, is that relevant in today's Ireland?

    It's been 10 years since I lived in Ireland so I am quite out of touch. Any tips on where we should considering buying a home would be welcome. Also open to hearing suggestions of good areas to raise children in Ireland.

    If your children are not baptised they will struggle to get a place in 90% of primary schools. You should research this, if you have kids of this age.


    No baptism, no school: Irish parents fight for equal access to education

    http://gu.com/p/4dffe


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,934 ✭✭✭ robp


    Saipanne wrote: »
    If your children are not baptised they will struggle to get a place in 90% of primary schools. You should research this, if you have kids of this age.

    Most Catholic schools don't use such a policy and all accept non-Catholics space permitting. But certainly some areas are woefully undersupplied with school places.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,882 Saipanne


    robp wrote: »
    Most Catholic schools don't use such a policy and all accept non-Catholics space permitting. But certainly some areas are woefully undersupplied with school places.

    Not according to what I've read.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,934 ✭✭✭ robp


    Saipanne wrote: »
    Not according to what I've read.

    The reality on the ground is that non-Catholics are a part of non-Catholics schools today and for decades. Some have prioritised Catholics, sibling, locals etc over others when space is short but that is not the normal experience.
    Getting back to the OP's request schools of all sorts are oversubscribed locally. Its a severe problem but a very regional one and depends on local demographics.


  • Registered Users Posts: 93 ✭✭✭ msshono


    If working from home is quality Broadband reliant then you need to factor this in, some rural areas have poor broadband or none at all...


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 4,691 ✭✭✭ 4ensic15


    Some Swedish people have lived in Athlone arising from the Ericsson factory there. They never had any problems integrating. Most people living around there are not native to the town so there is no "blow in" mentality.


  • Registered Users Posts: 144 ✭✭ LilyShame


    Hi op
    Research educate together school network and take it from there. These are non denominational schools...baptisn cert not issue here. Avoid long commute if possible. If your working from home then great. Can suggest Maynooth, greystones or skerries. Or stay in Sweden where childcare is second to none!!


  • Registered Users Posts: 259 ✭✭ lcwill


    If you work from home you can live anywhere you want so live somewhere beautiful and good for kids: go West or South, to Galway, Kerry or West Cork.

    Somewhere like Clonakility or Kinsale, towns with a bit of life and diversity. Lots of small towns are dying so pick the ones with something special.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 768 SpaceSasqwatch


    Cicilulu wrote: »
    We can work from home
    check internet service in the area too.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,656 ✭✭✭ maninasia


    robp wrote: »
    Most Catholic schools don't use such a policy and all accept non-Catholics space permitting. But certainly some areas are woefully undersupplied with school places.


    Not what I read either, in urban centres it seems to be a really significant problem. It would be among my top concerns if I was moving back with my kids.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,882 Saipanne


    robp wrote: »
    The reality on the ground is that non-Catholics are a part of non-Catholics schools today and for decades. Some have prioritised Catholics, sibling, locals etc over others when space is short but that is not the normal experience.
    Getting back to the OP's request schools of all sorts are oversubscribed locally. Its a severe problem but a very regional one and depends on local demographics.

    Most of the 90% of Catholic run schools discriminate based on religious belief. Do some research.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,164 Butters1979


    Edit: wrong thread somehow,


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  • Registered Users Posts: 23,723 ✭✭✭✭ Mrs OBumble


    Saipanne wrote: »
    Most of the 90% of Catholic run schools discriminate based on religious belief. Do some research.

    Define "discriminate".

    OP, it depends on how much it bothers you for your kids to be exposed to Catholicism.

    Very few Irish children declare themselves to be atheist until after they have received their confirmation money: yours will be subject to the same pressures if they attend a Catholic school.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,882 Saipanne


    Define "discriminate".

    OP, it depends on how much it bothers you for your kids to be exposed to Catholicism.

    Very few Irish children declare themselves to be atheist until after they have received their confirmation money: yours will be subject to the same pressures if they attend a Catholic school.

    You are missing the barn door by a mile there. I suggest you read the article I posted above or perhaps have a Google around before you jump to silly assumptions.

    In short, when applying for school places in Catholic run primary schools (which are 90% of primary schools, paid for by our taxes), Catholic children are first in the queue, with unbaptised children sent to the back. There are many, many reports of schools suggesting to non Catholic parents that they baptize their children, in order to guarantee them a place. Go to the Atheist forum and ask, if you doubt me.

    This is discrimination based on religion. It has nothing to do with religion class or studies.

    Maybe do the basic research first.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,882 Saipanne


    Here, for anyone who wants to research:

    http://bfy.tw/2wfy


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,420 ✭✭✭✭ athtrasna


    Folks this is the accommodation and property forum. Education has its own if you want to continue to debate this.


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