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Dreading School for my Child

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  • 14-08-2015 6:43pm
    #1
    Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 98 ✭✭


    My boy of 5 will be starting junior infants in September.

    When he was young he had a lot of ear infections which we think is the cause of his speech problems.

    I am ashamed to say that I don't even understand everything he says especially when he is excited and talks fast. I probably understand 85% of what he says.

    His sentence construction is also unusual but you get the gist of what he is saying (when you can understand him).

    He's had loads of speech therapy sessions and we work with him at him which can be a struggle because he never wants to do it (probably because he knows that it is a major weakness/embarrasement for him).

    Anyhow, I guess that I am just really worried about him being teased at school and/or him not achieving the marks that the school/society expect of him.

    He is a really loving boy with a great heart (for example he just came up to me for a hug while I was writing this post) and I am just scared that he'll get hurt.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 643 ✭✭✭maryk123


    Have you had a hearing test. Would there be something wrong there.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 98 ✭✭GuitarMusic


    maryk123 wrote: »
    Have you had a hearing test. Would there be something wrong there.

    Many thanks for the reply.

    He's Had had several hearing tests but they all came back clear.

    His speech is improving slowly though.


  • Registered Users Posts: 16 YesPlease


    Could you hold him back a year? If his speech is improving at the moment imagine were it'll be in a years time. Could save him / you a lot of hassle in primary school & start him off in education a more confident little boy!

    Might seem drastic now but if anything being older will benefit him when doing LC exams etc!


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 98 ✭✭GuitarMusic


    YesPlease wrote: »
    Could you hold him back a year? If his speech is improving at the moment imagine were it'll be in a years time. Could save him / you a lot of hassle in primary school & start him off in education a more confident little boy!

    Might seem drastic now but if anything being older will benefit him when doing LC exams etc!

    Yes, we had discussed that however I'll raise it with the OH again.

    A few months ago he was saying that he doesn't want to go to big school however when he went for 1 1/2 hours one morning with his pre-school friends he loved it. I think that maybe it would be easier for him if he moves on with his friends as opposed to holding him back a year as the pre-school is booked out already and we aren't too happy with the other pre-schools in the area.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,925 ✭✭✭RainyDay


    It sounds like you are doing all the right things by arranging speech therapy early and checking hearing. I know of one 11 year old who really should have got speech therapy at a very early age, and has quite a bad lisp as a result. It is quite hard for me to understand her at times.

    When mine had speech therapy, they got lots of games to play from the therapist to reinforce the lessons. In fact, she used to want to play the games long after the therapy finished. Is there anything more that your therapist could do to make the therapy more engaging?

    It would be important to have a good chat with the new teacher early on. Let them know what is happening with the therapy, and they may well be able to support this.


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  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,485 Mod ✭✭✭✭byhookorbycrook


    If he has a speech delay, he may be entitled to resource hours. Have you talked with the school?
    Children can be amazingly accepting and kind, they really can.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 1,120 ✭✭✭Wright


    My boy of 5 will be starting junior infants in September.

    When he was young he had a lot of ear infections which we think is the cause of his speech problems.

    I am ashamed to say that I don't even understand everything he says especially when he is excited and talks fast. I probably understand 85% of what he says.

    His sentence construction is also unusual but you get the gist of what he is saying (when you can understand him).

    He's had loads of speech therapy sessions and we work with him at him which can be a struggle because he never wants to do it (probably because he knows that it is a major weakness/embarrasement for him).

    Anyhow, I guess that I am just really worried about him being teased at school and/or him not achieving the marks that the school/society expect of him.

    He is a really loving boy with a great heart (for example he just came up to me for a hug while I was writing this post) and I am just scared that he'll get hurt.

    My heart goes out to you, you sound desperate and scared. I would say just to have a word with his teacher to keep an eye on him. Being around so much more language being spoken from all directions (from the kids) might tune his ears a little better so this might actually be a good thing. Keep an eye on him if he starts coming home quiet and withdrawn, in case the other kids do notice. The upside to that is maybe he'd work harder on his speech exercises then. Good luck.


  • Registered Users Posts: 769 ✭✭✭annoyedgal


    I have few years teaching experience and if your boy's school is anything like mine you have nothing to fear!
    We have numerous children with speech delays or difficulties and the amazing thing is that the other children don't seem to notice at all! In fact they often 'translate' for the child 'no teacher he said. ......'. Children can have a much better understanding of each others communication styles than adults!
    Particularly in the younger classes children mix so well regardless of language barriers, speech difficulties or special needs, it's wonderful to see.
    You are right in my opinion to start him with his friends. Speak to the teacher beforehand so he or she knows your fears and can reassure you. Keep going with the SLT and the work at home. It's great that it's improving for him and hopefully will improve even more when he starts school.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 98 ✭✭GuitarMusic


    Thanks for all of your replies. I'm not desperate nor scared just worried that my child may be bullied or suffer self esteem issues. He is actually making really good progress lately and tries to pronouce his problem letters very clearly.

    Many thanks for your PM's too. It is much appreciated and they do make me feel better. :-)


  • Registered Users Posts: 28,207 ✭✭✭✭looksee


    Thanks for all of your replies. I'm not desperate nor scared just worried that my child may be bullied or suffer self esteem issues. He is actually making really good progress lately and tries to pronouce his problem letters very clearly.

    Many thanks for your PM's too. It is much appreciated and they do make me feel better. :-)

    Bullying does happen in schools OP, but I wonder how much relates just to issues like your son's? I can think of children with quite noticeable speech/health or other issues who have not been bullied, and children with no obvious issues who have been serious victims of bullying.

    My advice - though with no professional basis - would be to work on giving your child a sense of confidence and self esteem without even the possibility that bullying could be an issue. Of course you will keep an eye on the situation, but don't let it be obvious that you are afraid there might be a problem.


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