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No planning permission

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  • 20-06-2015 3:45am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4


    Hi, I'm interested in buying an old cottage that is for sale without planning permission. I've read on a few forums that homes built pre-1963 did not require planning permission. Is this true? If so, do I need to get planning permission now? How does it work? What if I want to extend or sell in the future.

    Thanks


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  • Registered Users Posts: 12,089 ✭✭✭✭P. Breathnach


    Hi, I'm interested in buying an old cottage that is for sale without planning permission. I've read on a few forums that homes built pre-1963 did not require planning permission. Is this true? If so, do I need to get planning permission now? How does it work? What if I want to extend or sell in the future.

    Thanks
    There was no such thing as planning permission before 1963: that's the date of of Local Government (Planning and Development) Act.

    You don't need to apply for retrospective permission. The absence of an unnecessary permission is no impediment to selling.

    You might need planning permission if you wanted to make substantial changes to a property. A modest extension at the rear might be exempt.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,926 Mod ✭✭✭✭Gumbo


    Hi, I'm interested in buying an old cottage that is for sale without planning permission. I've read on a few forums that homes built pre-1963 did not require planning permission. Is this true? If so, do I need to get planning permission now? How does it work? What if I want to extend or sell in the future.

    Thanks

    If you are buying the property, the seller should have an architects opinion on exemption from planning permission based on the year of construction (1963).

    They can do so by studying old maps, historic photos or by surveying the method of construction and basing their opinion on this.

    The seller should have this to allow a sale to go through as your solicitor will request it with the other documentation including BER, LPT etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 10,254 ✭✭✭✭Marcusm


    Actually, 1 October 1964 is the relevant date. Pre1963 is used as a shorthand reference to the provisions but is not strictly accurate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 Rathminesgirl


    Thank you all for your informative replies. My mind is at ease having this knowledge. Fingers crossed now they accept my offer.


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 38,926 Mod ✭✭✭✭Gumbo


    Thank you all for your informative replies. My mind is at ease having this knowledge. Fingers crossed now they accept my offer.

    Just make sure the certificate is a condition of the sale. Last thing you need is to buy and then realise you need retention, even if it is outside of the enforcement period, it could still cause problems.

    Mention it to your solicitor.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭JimsAlterEgo


    perhaps alterations have happened with out PP


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