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One-off housing and infrastructure projects

  • 14-06-2015 7:22am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 18,889 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    The extension of the A100 here in Berlin is also deeply controversial and strongly protested against. Germany isn't all that densely populated and people live in villages, towns and cities. It is forbidden to build a dwelling outside a defined built up area. The Irish way of buying a corner of a farmers field and building a house doesn't exist here, so you can still easily find ways to thread new motorways through.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,453 ✭✭✭ strassenwo!f


    murphaph wrote: »
    The extension of the A100 here in Berlin is also deeply controversial and strongly protested against. Germany isn't all that densely populated and people live in villages, towns and cities. It is forbidden to build a dwelling outside a defined built up area. The Irish way of buying a corner of a farmers field and building a house doesn't exist here, so you can still easily find ways to thread new motorways through.

    This is particularly evident when you fly over Northern Germany, where you can mostly only see discrete villages and towns, with only agricultural land (or forest) between them. In areas like Bavaria and the South-West it seems to be much more like the Irish situation, with isolated housing. I haven't ever looked for any figures, but I'd imagine that Germany has a much larger percentage of its land devoted to agriculture than Ireland does, despite having a considerably higher population density.

    It's certainly hard to imagine that Germany (or pretty well any country) would be capable of such a planning boo-boo as we have witnessed in County Dublin, where a potential eight-kilometre stretch of railway line linking Tallaght with the proposed 4-track Hazelhatch-Heuston line (and the DART underground tunnel) appears to have been squandered by poor planning.

    This is, after all, a corridor with around 100,000 citizens, including Tallaght (Dublin's highest population suburb) and Clondalkin. It seems logical that people along this corridor would benefit from a journey of max 15-20 minutes into the city, and it seems logical that a rail operator would want to provide such a service for such a large amount of people, especially when the proposed tunnel will have a lot of excess capacity.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    murphaph wrote: »
    The Irish way of buying a corner of a farmers field and building a house doesn't exist here, so you can still easily find ways to thread new motorways through.

    I remember it was actually an NRA man who pointed out around the turn of the century that if Ireland kept building houses in every field no major infrastructure projects would be possible because they would all impact of scores of dwellings and trigger virulent Nimbyism.

    We can see this now with pipelines, windmills, roads, telephone masts, power-lines - and now doubt with railway lines if we ever tried to build one through greenfield countryside.

    Wait till they get around (:rolleyes:) to building new greenfield commuter heavy-rail lines that go overground through semi-rural suburban areas!


  • Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators Posts: 13,991 Mod ✭✭✭✭ monument


    murphaph wrote: »
    It is forbidden to build a dwelling outside a defined built up area.

    The policy was agreed on in the Netherlands at some point.

    Here there are some moves to it seen in some local media reports about planning permission being rejected. With national guidance, local planners are now marking large tracks of area as to be "Rural Areas under Strong Urban Influence" when the planning of one-off houses is being belatedly restricted.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    There are even more abandoned houses/ruins in the countryside than new (post-1960) "one-offs".

    My understanding is that currently you can get permission to build on any of these? If so, the new laws will have to phase that out or there will be an endless supply of rural sites still available.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,092 ✭✭✭ GerardKeating


    There are even more abandoned houses/ruins in the countryside than new (post-1960) "one-offs".

    My understanding is that currently you can get permission to build on any of these? If so, the new laws will have to phase that out or there will be an endless supply of rural sites still available.

    No exactly, there is a limit how far back one can go with ruins, You might often see in a prorerty add, a mention when it was last inhabited.

    Also if the house was "replaced" with a new house, then the permission for that house might contain a clause requiring the old house never be used again.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,453 ✭✭✭ strassenwo!f


    I'm a bit surprised these posts were all shaved off the "DART Underground" thread.

    The National Transport Authority itself said recently that it is unlikely that any underground rail projects will be operational in Dublin until 2023 at the earliest.

    This would mean that construction of the DART Underground project - if it happens - is probably not going to start until at least 2018-2019, ie three to four years from now.

    With such a long lead-in to (possible) construction of this proposed line, is discussion on the "DART Underground" thread already intended to be limited to, for example, the number of escalators which there will be at Christchurch, or the location of the ticket machines at Heuston?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,453 ✭✭✭ strassenwo!f


    OK, I see now that comments which were related to Dublin's transport options for the future are now turning into a discussion of ruins in Galway.

    In a thread with a mere 6 posts.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 6,995 Schadenfreudia


    OK, I see now that comments which were related to Dublin's transport options for the future are now turning into a discussion of ruins in Galway.

    Not just in Galway....unless you refer to the football team ;)


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