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Which Petrol brushcutter "strimmer"?

  • 10-06-2015 7:57pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 831 ✭✭✭


    Fed up with my old husky 232r.
    hard to start, Pull start pulley wears, dies when lift off throttle, ect.
    Never really thought it was great even when new.
    but it must be 15-20yrs now.
    what is a good replacement??
    Someone here will know for sure.


«1

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,938 ✭✭✭galljga1


    I have the same question. I am considering buying a multi purpose tool, one motor, brushcutter, hedge trimmer etc. Anybody got opinions?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,975 ✭✭✭Connemara Farmer


    Have a Honda 4 stroke one, has a blade for a head but can take whip as well. Great job, starts first time even after being laid up over Winter, very quiet.


  • Registered Users Posts: 831 ✭✭✭satstheway


    Contractor beside me has a back mounted one and hes not happy with the power. Granted he did say its quiet but he advised against.
    cost a pretty penny too.
    Have a Honda 4 stroke one, has a blade for a head but can take whip as well. Great job, starts first time even after being laid up over Winter, very quiet.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,975 ✭✭✭Connemara Farmer


    Dunno, I've not had an issue with it tbh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,802 ✭✭✭enricoh


    Have a Tanaka one about 10 years now, don't think ive ever touched it apart from put in juice n cable. Might splash out n get it a new spark plug in a year or two!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,668 ✭✭✭kay 9


    Stihl do a good one. Recently used an oleo mac and it's definitely my next purchase. None of the others come close as regards power and handling. Used a Honda too, shaft broke at the handle. Whilst easy start and light weight it lacks grunt. Oleo mac all the way


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 740 ✭✭✭IH784man


    The father bought a German yok at a market the other day,4 in 1 tool,hedgecutter,chain saw,grass cutter and normal strummer head.Good enough job.Its long reach for cutting branches.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,019 ✭✭✭zetecescort


    have an Oleo Mac with 7 or 8 years, blade or string. Do along a 200 yard lane way, along roadside of our fields and more once a year, 3 or 4 hours work for a week or so along with bits here and there around house and yard a few times a year. never a problem, starts very easy after winter.

    would definitely recommend one and I'll be looking into their chainsaws when I change in the next few years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13,326 ✭✭✭✭cj maxx


    galljga1 wrote: »
    I have the same question. I am considering buying a multi purpose tool, one motor, brushcutter, hedge trimmer etc. Anybody got opinions?

    Ive a sthil (?). Good yoke . Tanaka i hear are equaliy as good and popular ( for parts/service) so id look at those first


  • Registered Users Posts: 831 ✭✭✭satstheway


    Friends have oley Mac chainsaws. Large and small
    the small one is great but large one had some clutch problem but he got it sorted.
    I like my stihl saws.
    have an Oleo Mac with 7 or 8 years, blade or string. Do along a 200 yard lane way, along roadside of our fields and more once a year, 3 or 4 hours work for a week or so along with bits here and there around house and yard a few times a year. never a problem, starts very easy after winter.

    would definitely recommend one and I'll be looking into their chainsaws when I change in the next few years.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 770 ✭✭✭viztopia


    enricoh wrote: »
    Have a Tanaka one about 10 years now, don't think ive ever touched it apart from put in juice n cable. Might splash out n get it a new spark plug in a year or two!

    Hard to beat the tanaka!


  • Registered Users Posts: 712 ✭✭✭P_Cash


    if your buying it for the farm, buy a good one.

    i was very tempted by a €80-120 yoke from woodies, all the attachments. light, cheap, but it was a strimmer with what i wanted.

    http://www.hondaireland.ie/lawn-garden/brushcutters/umk435-eue/

    in the very end, i said what am i doing, its not a semi D in town ill be using it on, its a farm. so went with the above, 3 yrs ago, and havent looked back since.

    Robert Kees letterkenny i got mine from, 490-510 if i remember.

    beaut of a yoke. starts first time, everytime.


  • Registered Users, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 68,370 Mod ✭✭✭✭Grid.


    Hard to look beyond Stihl or Tanaka....the Kombi system is excellent btw.


  • Registered Users Posts: 831 ✭✭✭satstheway


    Ur not so far from me then.
    might get a demoðŸ˜႒
    P_Cash wrote: »
    if your buying it for the farm, buy a good one.

    i was very tempted by a €80-120 yoke from woodies, all the attachments. light, cheap, but it was a strimmer with what i wanted.

    http://www.hondaireland.ie/lawn-garden/brushcutters/umk435-eue/


    in the very end, i said what am i doing, its not a semi D in town ill be using it on, its a farm. so went with the above, 3 yrs ago, and havent looked back since.

    Robert Kees letterkenny i got mine from, 490-510 if i remember.

    beaut of a yoke. starts first time, everytime.


  • Registered Users Posts: 712 ✭✭✭P_Cash


    Meant to say, unless it's used around a small house for trimming more than anything, u need bike handle bars,
    Could never imagine using that O shaped handle on most of them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 963 ✭✭✭Count Mondego


    Did alot of research into this last year myself. Bought a Tanaka and very happy, 540 model or something like that. Get it big enough anyway, over 40cc. Only complaint is that the fuel cap is temperamental, tighten too much or too little and it drips out.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,191 ✭✭✭✭Nekarsulm


    Have a Oleo-Mac 740, which I think is 40cc engine. Its been very good, have it 15 years or so now.
    Have a good dealer not too far away, which helps a lot if you do need anything.
    The crews cutting roadside verges for the council were using all Oleo Mac when I bought mine, and they were happy with them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 831 ✭✭✭satstheway


    Surprised u only have 1 Nek.
    Any idea what the new ones cost.
    Nekarsulm wrote: »
    Have a Oleo-Mac 740, which I think is 40cc engine. Its been very good, have it 15 years or so now.
    Have a good dealer not too far away, which helps a lot if you do need anything.
    The crews cutting roadside verges for the council were using all Oleo Mac when I bought mine, and they were happy with them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,191 ✭✭✭✭Nekarsulm


    satstheway wrote: »
    Surprised u only have 1 Nek.
    Any idea what the new ones cost.

    Had a 4 stroke Honda, with the bent shaft. Was stolen :mad:
    No idea about the Oleo Mac prices atm


  • Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 12,615 Mod ✭✭✭✭blue5000


    Ryobi here, left out last winter, and the year before. Took the plug out, sanded, the metal ends where the spark is. Put the plug in the oven for 20mins, drained the tank and put fresh petrol in it, and a few drops in the plug hole. Couldn't believe the bitch started and has been going fine since. Needless to say it's been put in the shed since:o

    If the seat's wet, sit on yer hat, a cool head is better than a wet ar5e.



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  • Registered Users Posts: 496 ✭✭agriman27


    I bought a sthil km90r multi tool two years ago, I have as strimmer head, hedge trimmer, and pole saw head. It's a great quality yolk and has lots of power, dear at the time but couldn't manage without it now


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭realtec


    i got a new strimmer recently. looked at a good few. the Honda seemed to have very good reviews had a very good harness. the Honda was 4 stroke also so was not quite as responsive as the 2 stokes. the tanaka tbc 4200 was the other make i shortlisted(2 stroke). i found out there was a promotion on the tanaka with a special offer price plus 5 year warranty for domestic use that i felt could not be beaten. i ended up buying the tanaka on that basis. very happy with it and it's a good powerful machine. check if that promotion is still available from your local tanaka dealer. worth considering.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,457 ✭✭✭ford2600


    Bought an oleomac 15 years ago and was a brilliant machine until I broke my own golden rule and gave a loan of it to someone....

    Replaced with 4 stroke honda which has been excellent but in truth, other than noise, I preferred oleomac; more responsive(being 2 stroke) and more powerful.

    Best small engine machine I ever owned.

    BTW if you need a strimmer for a nice bit of work
    1. Buy a good one
    2. Don't buy a combi yoke. Wide bars with a good harness are essential. I have an oleomac extension hedge cutter which can take a strimmer head or chainsaw but you wouldn't strim much/chainsaw much with it; great yoke for hedges though. Brilliant engine in it to.

    TLDR. Oleomac FTW


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,115 ✭✭✭monkeynuz


    I have tanaka tbc230s for very light trimming, stihl km130r and husky 333rj(discontinued) for medium to heavy work and stihl fs 460 for heavy stuff, the km130r is a mean piece of kit and would do you very well for strimming and hedges.


  • Registered Users Posts: 74 ✭✭gerico


    I use a Tanake TBC 340 for heavy brush cutting with 3 point blade and general strimming. I also use the 10" chainsaw extension bar as well for lopping trees and never had a problem with power or starting. Great machines but can be quite heavy in comparison to a standard strimmer which can catch people out.
    overall for the money tanaka are good value (cant really comment on other types though)


  • Registered Users Posts: 206 ✭✭ford 5600


    I bought a 53cc Efco (think it's the same as an Oleomac?) , in 1999.gave fair money for it, but a fraction of normal retail price as man was glad to sell it off. I got it serviced for the first time a month ago, so that says something for its reliability. A sow of a machine to cut, you would do more in an hour with it , than a day with a small yoke. Only downside, it's a heavy brute, and you would think after a day of it, that you had done a round with Conor mcGregor. It has a 3 legged star blade, a saw blade as well as the line head. I have only ever seen 1 more like it. I would think they were made for professional/council work. I would give it 11 out of 10.


  • Registered Users Posts: 712 ✭✭✭P_Cash


    Poor op. I think we posted every Strimmer manufactured


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,019 ✭✭✭zetecescort


    P_Cash wrote: »
    Poor op. I think we posted every Strimmer manufactured

    maybe, but at least the op knows they won't go far wrong with a good known brand machine


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,119 ✭✭✭✭Base price


    My brother bought a Tanaka about 18 years ago. You can use the whip cord or attach a disc. To this day it is still going strong. He services it himself and as far as I know he has not had to replace any major parts. He buys the red whip cord as it less likely to break. The same strimmer does the rounds of the family, I borrow it, my other brother borrows it and the brother that owns it uses in on his place and my mams. He has the handle bars on it which makes it easier to use.
    He also has a Tanaka hedge trimmer (12yo) with a extended bladed. I also have one with the normal blade (8yo)


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  • Registered Users Posts: 6,326 ✭✭✭Farmer Pudsey


    I have a sthil it is over 20 years old. It was the first of the lighter models. service it every 4-5 years make sure to use the special grease for the head. It has done a good bit of work and is still going strong.


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