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LAPL license in Ireland

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  • 06-06-2015 3:13pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 69 ✭✭


    Hi all,

    After narrowly failing the class 2 medical I have been given a LAPL medical.

    I have no intention of flying commercially, so the LAPL restrictions do not bother me.

    Are there any schools in Ireland offering this training? It seems none are willing to do it.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 10,095 ✭✭✭✭smurfjed


    I cant answer your question, but i'm curious about the LAPL medical, what are the restrictions?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 rn.andyb


    palmtrees wrote: »
    Hi all,

    After narrowly failing the class 2 medical I have been given a LAPL medical.

    I have no intention of flying commercially, so the LAPL restrictions do not bother me.

    Are there any schools in Ireland offering this training? It seems none are willing to do it.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated

    I was in the same boat as yourself not long ago. Failed the medical due to my eyesight, was given a LAPL medical instead (thankfully!). I'm currently ~8 hours into my LAPL with the NFC at Weston.

    Kind Regards,
    Andrew


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,729 ✭✭✭martinsvi


    rn.andyb wrote: »
    I was in the same boat as yourself not long ago. Failed the medical due to my eyesight, was given a LAPL medical instead (thankfully!). I'm currently ~8 hours into my LAPL with the NFC at Weston.

    Kind Regards,
    Andrew

    out of curiosity, what type are you training on and what is the cost per hour?


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 rn.andyb


    smurfjed wrote: »
    I cant answer your question, but i'm curious about the LAPL medical, what are the restrictions?

    I believe the restrictions for the LAPL license are along the lines of:
    - VFR only, so no IR, which I believe means no CPL.
    - 2,000kg MTOW
    - Max 4 SOB (you and three passengers)
    - Single Engine only

    The minor upside to the LAPL is that it is a lifetime license, it does not expire as long as you remain current (12 hours every 24 months).

    I cannot include links as I have under 25 posts, however a quick Google search turns up information on the CAA website and Subpart B of the EASA AMC to Part FCL.
    martinsvi wrote: »
    out of curiosity, what type are you training on and what is the cost per hour?

    Training in a 152, cost is €215 per hour (with instructor) and an additional €6 landing fee. As with palmtrees, I am also interested in hearing what other options are available for people that are limited to a LAPL medical.

    Kind Regards,
    Andrew


  • Registered Users Posts: 900 ✭✭✭Xpro


    If you are near Abbeyshrule give Ultraflight a call, much cheaper then weston. They operate both Class A and microlight Samba's XXL


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  • Registered Users Posts: 69 ✭✭palmtrees


    rn.andyb wrote: »
    I was in the same boat as yourself not long ago. Failed the medical due to my eyesight, was given a LAPL medical instead (thankfully!). I'm currently ~8 hours into my LAPL with the NFC at Weston.

    Kind Regards,
    Andrew

    That's great to hear, Andy. I got in touch with NFC but didn't hear back. Good to know that's an option!

    @Xpro, I was just on ultraflight's website. It looks like they just offer microlight training, or is the site just outdated?


  • Registered Users Posts: 33 Jpb7


    Hi All
    hope your all keeping safe
    I was thinking of taking up lessons (LAPL) I'm a bit confused .com
    I was on one aerodrome website advertising that they provide training for National LAPL I know the requirements and limitations they claim that after you.achieve your licence you can fly a SEP aircraft up to 2000kg like: Cessna/Piper

    Then my attention was drawn to another aerodrome ...they to were also offering lessons for LAPL but this particular club stated that the LAPL does NOT permit you to fly aircraft like Cessna I realised that there are 2 types of LAPL.. 1 National LAPL.... 2 EASA LAPL they both have the same requirement 30hrs ECT...ECT.. I'm confused
    I assumed that the LAPL was just a single syllabus... I'm I wrong??


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 rn.andyb


    I hadn't heard of the "National LAPL" until reading your post, but both have privileges to fly SEP <2000kg 4 people.

    For the EASA privileges:
    https://www.easa.europa.eu/domains/general-aviation/licensing-general-aviation
    For example, the privileges of an LAPL for aeroplanes are limited to single-engine piston aeroplanes up to 2,000kg, carrying up to 4 persons on board (including yourself– the pilot). You can only fly in good weather conditions (visual flight rules (VFR)).

    For the National LAPL privileges from the IAA website:
    https://www.iaa.ie/news/2020/07/21/national-flight-training-organisation-certificate
    The National LAPL(A) privileges are to act as PIC on single-engine piston aeroplanes-land with a maximum certificated take-off mass of 2,000 kg or less, carrying a maximum of 3 passengers

    Anyone able to throw in some input on the advantages/disadvantages?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,979 ✭✭✭Stovepipe


    unless you are getting confused between a microlight license and a LAPL. Ring the lads at Limetree,FunFly Aerosports for clarification. Great people and great aircraft.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33 Jpb7


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    unless you are getting confused between a microlight license and a LAPL. Ring the lads at Limetree,FunFly Aerosports for clarification. Great people and great aircraft.

    I assumed it was a typing error, there's no mention of LAPL(M) on the site Just National LAPL Maybe there was an Amendment to the syllabus
    I know they use Microlight aircraft for training which would be more advantageous since operation and running cost would mean reduced fees


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  • Registered Users Posts: 33 Jpb7


    Jpb7 wrote: »
    I assumed it was a typing error, there's no mention of LAPL(M) on the site Just National LAPL Maybe there was an Amendment to the syllabus
    I know they use Microlight aircraft for training which would be more advantageous since operation and running cost would mean reduced fees

    This is a "Direct Quote" taken from the website

    (Quote)

    "National LAPL
    The National LAPL (Light Aircraft Pilot Licence) is the perfect licence for recreational flying in Ireland. It allows the holder to fly a single engine piston aircraft up to 2000kgs maximum takeoff weight and a maximum of 4 seats. This classification covers about 95% or more of the light aircraft available on the market. The licence can be exercised on Irish registered permit aircraft which including single engine homebuilds and microlights. At the moment you cannot use this licence to fly a Cessna or other EASA aircraft as a European Licence is required for that. Our National LAPL course mirrors the EASA course exactly and we’re working with the Irish Aviation Authority to come up with a simple conversion to an EASA LAPL. The huge benefit of this licence is that we can conduct the training on modern factory built permit aircraft which allows us to do the training at a much lower cost to the student. As most recreational pilots mainly fly more affordable permit aircraft there’s no requirement for a more expensive European licence,"

    End Quote


  • Registered Users Posts: 33 Jpb7


    Jpb7 wrote: »
    I assumed it was a typing error, there's no mention of LAPL(M) on the site Just National LAPL Maybe there was an Amendment to the syllabus
    I know they use Microlight aircraft for training which would be more advantageous since operation and running cost would mean reduced fees

    This is a "Direct Quote" taken from the website

    (Quote)

    "National LAPL
    The National LAPL (Light Aircraft Pilot Licence) is the perfect licence for recreational flying in Ireland. It allows the holder to fly a single engine piston aircraft up to 2000kgs maximum takeoff weight and a maximum of 4 seats. This classification covers about 95% or more of the light aircraft available on the market. The licence can be exercised on Irish registered permit aircraft which including single engine homebuilds and microlights. At the moment you cannot use this licence to fly a Cessna or other EASA aircraft as a European Licence is required for that. Our National LAPL course mirrors the EASA course exactly and we’re working with the Irish Aviation Authority to come up with a simple conversion to an EASA LAPL. The huge benefit of this licence is that we can conduct the training on modern factory built permit aircraft which allows us to do the training at a much lower cost to the student. As most recreational pilots mainly fly more affordable permit aircraft there’s no requirement for a more expensive European licence,"

    End Quote


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,057 ✭✭✭civdef


    Currently the national liences (national PPL & national LAPL) don't cover flying EASA certified aircraft like Cessna 172s. They cover aircraft operated on a permit - which is a pretty big list: https://ilas.ie/TypeList

    There is a process for converting a national licence to its EASA equivalent - best source for info on that is the relevant flight school.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33 Jpb7


    civdef wrote: »
    Currently the national liences (national PPL & national LAPL) don't cover flying EASA certified aircraft like Cessna 172s. They cover aircraft operated on a permit - which is a pretty big list: https://ilas.ie/TypeList

    There is a process for converting a national licence to its EASA equivalent - best source for info on that is the relevant flight school.

    But the minimum requirements are the same.....30hrs flight training ,with 100hrs Ground School ,plus the 9 exams


    anyway thanks for the info.i hope.to commence when this Covid madness ends


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,979 ✭✭✭Stovepipe


    Do the EASA license and you can convert to the microlights later. Savannahs and Sambas are easy to convert to and are more fun to fly than a Cessna any day and considerably cheaper to run. There are many types of very capable microlight out there to sample.


  • Registered Users Posts: 48 Vinnie B


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    Do the EASA license and you can convert to the microlights later. Savannahs and Sambas are easy to convert to and are more fun to fly than a Cessna any day and considerably cheaper to run. There are many types of very capable microlight out there to sample.

    What are the requirements with the shoe on the opposite foot - PPLM license to LAPL?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,979 ✭✭✭Stovepipe


    Contact the funtofly lads in Limetree and they will advise exactly re hours required/exams required/flight test/medical.


  • Registered Users Posts: 33 Jpb7


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    Contact the funtofly lads in Limetree and they will advise exactly re hours required/exams required/flight test/medical.

    I was on the limetree site the Savannahs look nice and fun to fly, plus abbyshruel have the Samba xxl

    The thing is I'm from Dublin so the nearest is weston...then its either Newcastle, Trim, or Limetree

    I have to consider the added cost, like travelling to and from the airfield and onsite Groundschool.

    anyway its gonna have to.wait until.Next year due to the pandemic urill.im.back.ro.full.employment


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