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Lead in water

  • #2
    Closed Accounts Posts: 77 ✭✭✭ Winnie21


    Hi all,

    So it has emerged that in some places the water lead level is significantly higher than legal limits and this can have an adverse effect on health etc.

    My question is - how do you know if this affects you? Does it depend on how old the house is? My house is a new build (one year old) and really want to know if I could be affected. Would appreciate any info on this.

    (mod if this is in the wrong place apologies, please move as appropriate)


Comments

  • #2


    This seems more suited to the Environmental Science forum.

    Moved from Dublin County North.


  • #2


    The water leaving plants won't have high limits of lead, the plants will usually cut off supply than send out water over the PCV limits.

    New houses are a lot less likely to have lead in the pipes, it's usually older systems where pipes may have rusted or degraded that would have higher lead levels.

    If you are concerned about the levels of metals in the water, you can always take a sample from your tap and have it tested independently. There's a lot of places that could carry out this testing for you


  • #2


    The water leaving plants won't have high limits of lead, the plants will usually cut off supply than send out water over the PCV limits.

    New houses are a lot less likely to have lead in the pipes, it's usually older systems where pipes may have rusted or degraded that would have higher lead levels.

    If you are concerned about the levels of metals in the water, you can always take a sample from your tap and have it tested independently. There's a lot of places that could carry out this testing for you

    Can you PM some of those. Found what looks like a lead pipe coming in off the front street in my house (and then switching to copper for onward distribution, under the stairs)

    Bit worried if I'm honest...


  • #2


    Houses built after 1980 will not have any lead pipes. If the house has been re-plumbed, then it will be done in copper or plastic. Residual pipes will be left as lead - such as the pipe from the road stop-cock to the household stop-cock.

    This should not be a problem since the volume of water in the pipe is very small - less than a litre. If you are worried about it, then flush the toilet first thing - which is what you probably do already. If that loo is not attached to the mains directly, you will have to wait for the tank to refill.

    Lead pipes in the house should be replaced anyway and probably have been in most cases. I am not sure how many plumbers can do a wiped joint these days.


  • #2


    You can get your water supply tested for lead by the public analyst's laboratory in Dublin for €10

    I've published the steps to get this done here:
    http://www.ossiansmyth.ie/how-to-get-your-water-tested-for-lead-in-dublin/


  • #2


    Sorry to resurrect an old thread

    We haven't got any contact from Uisce until now regarding water bills etc until now... however 2 months ago we got a letter pushed through the letterbox stating the houses on our road have a gigantic level of lead. It was from our Residence committee in Milltown (I can't find any details to contact them online)

    Is this something we can go back to Uisce with, and how big of a concern is it? Our house is rented and quite old.

    Thanks


  • #2


    Get the water tested at the public analyst as a start. Ask them how you sample - first thing, mid flow, last thing etc. You must be guided by them to get a meaningful result. Your neighbour may have an agenda, not backed by test results.

    Secondly, flush the toilet first thing in the morning to purge the water from the mains to the house. Lead levels are higher after overnight sitting in the lead pipe. Public supply is generally free of lead.

    Having flushed the loo, run the kitchen tap for a few seconds to purge that pipe from the rising main. A few seconds will probably be enough as you are talking about a few litres. Water consumed in a household is usually obtained from the kitchen tap.

    Most of the water you use in the house apart from the kitchen tap is not consumed - unless you drink your bath water - so do not worry.


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