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Should I study in Scotland?

  • #2
    Registered Users Posts: 30 ✭✭✭ cxxlin


    Okay hi, I'm Colin, I'm 16 and I'm thinking of studying in Scotland.
    There isn't really a concrete reason for me to go to Scotland, I just don't particularly like Ireland and would like to study elsewhere.
    I've talked about this with my dad and after a bit of arguing I got him around the thought of me going.

    But I have just a few questions
    - What's the price of living in Scotland? Is it higher or lower then the price of Limerick or Galway?
    - What are the people like there? Are they friendly?
    - When should I start considering actually trying to find a place there and how will I find places there? What would the prices range from/to?

    I'm planning on either doing either Psychology in Edinburgh Napier Uni which requires B1, B2, B2 & B2 at HL including English and an A2 at OL Maths
    or
    Sociology and Psychology at the Uni of Edinburgh and its minimum requirements are 5B's at HL..

    I'd appreciate any help at all on the mattter!


Comments

  • #2


    anyone?


  • #2


    I'm in my third in year in Edinburgh Napier, one of the better decisions I have made in my life though I have ten years on you.

    Edinburgh is an expensive city but no more than Dublin. I'm paying approx €500 (with the current state of the euro) per month for accommodation with 3 other lads in the city center. For it's location it's good value considering most I know pay more. Day to day expenses are roughly the equivalent in Ireland with the exception of booze.. booze is cheaper!

    The Scots are lovely people and similar to the Irish. We share a very similar language (you will see the word Fáilte everywhere in Edinburgh). Biggest difference is the accents. Plenty of Irish live in Edinburgh.

    In my first year I moved into student accommodation as I didn't know a soul in the city, it's a great way to meet new people. You need to have an unconditional offer in most universities before you can apply for accommodation. Think UCAS (UK equivalent to CAO) has to be submitted by the middle of January. It requires a lot more work than the CAO so it is best to start the process as early as possible.

    Psychology is not a 4 year undergraduate degree, you really need to do a minimum of a Masters or PHD before you will be able to get work in that field. It is worth considering as they can be quite expensive. I'm not sure what Napier's psychology is like as I study computers


  • #2


    Hey! I went to Uni in Glasgow and it was the best decision I've ever made. I graduated in 2010 and the rents in Glasgow have increased a fair bit but it is still significantly cheaper than renting in Ireland/Edinburgh (I love Glasgow so much I still go back every few months).

    Not having fees to pay is another huge advantage Scotland has over the 'admin' fees in Ireland and the extortionate fees in rUK. I'm not sure if SAAS (Student Awards Agency Scotland), is still the main point of contact for fees, but that's the Agency that in my time covered the costs.

    Also you have the option of flying to Glasgow and Edinburgh depending on how cheap the flights are, as there are frequent train and buses between the two.

    As Battleflag pointed out, the cost of nights out are much cheaper than Ireland and the choices are pretty good.


  • #2


    I'm in Aberdeen. Accomodation is quite pricey due to the oil people (something I wish I'd looked into beforehand tbh).

    The people have been quite nice so far, nicer than most Irish people imo. There are a lot of people from Shetland and Orkney here and I've yet to meet one I haven't liked.

    I'm living in the cheapest place I coud find at 400 pcm including bills. Most places in the city avergae about 450 although the cheapest RGU accomodation is 460 inc bills


  • #2


    La_Gordy wrote: »
    Hey! I went to Uni in Glasgow and it was the best decision I've ever made. I graduated in 2010 and the rents in Glasgow have increased a fair bit but it is still significantly cheaper than renting in Ireland/Edinburgh (I love Glasgow so much I still go back every few months).

    Not having fees to pay is another huge advantage Scotland has over the 'admin' fees in Ireland and the extortionate fees in rUK. I'm not sure if SAAS (Student Awards Agency Scotland), is still the main point of contact for fees, but that's the Agency that in my time covered the costs.

    Also you have the option of flying to Glasgow and Edinburgh depending on how cheap the flights are, as there are frequent train and buses between the two.

    As Battleflag pointed out, the cost of nights out are much cheaper than Ireland and the choices are pretty good.

    Hi

    Just wondering is the SAAS similar to SUSI In Ireland which cover all grants in Ireland now.
    Is this a grant or is it a waiver of fees?
    Thanks for taking the time to read!


  • #2


    meganob wrote: »
    Hi

    Just wondering is the SAAS similar to SUSI In Ireland which cover all grants in Ireland now.
    Is this a grant or is it a waiver of fees?
    Thanks for taking the time to read!

    It's a waiver of fees for those from the EU. It is a grant for the Scots.


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