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Osymetrics

Comments



  • Kurt Godel wrote: »
    Has anyone used Osymetrics on their TT bike before? If so, how did you find them?

    Pgibbo and bambatta have.




  • Is it a choice between osymetrics on tt bike and power on road bike or is there the chance to use the osymetrics with power?? I've no experience of them but if it was a choice of them or power I'd go with the powermeter.




  • joey100 wrote: »
    Is it a choice between osymetrics on tt bike and power on road bike or is there the chance to use the osymetrics with power?? I've no experience of them but if it was a choice of them or power I'd go with the powermeter.

    Thats one of my questions (how do you swap between the two bikes easily), but you can use the PM dedicated with the O-rings. However I'm more curious on general opinions. I'm a little surprised they don't get much discussion on a tri forum like this, that would lead me to think they are a gimmick (ST discussion seems divided), but I like the feel of them and knowing what I do about vectors and torque forces, they make mathematical sense.




  • Kurt Godel wrote: »
    Thats one of my questions (how do you swap between the two bikes easily), but you can use the PM dedicated with the O-rings. However I'm more curious on general opinions. I'm a little surprised they don't get much discussion on a tri forum like this, that would lead me to think they are a gimmick (ST discussion seems divided), but I like the feel of them and knowing what I do about vectors and torque forces, they make mathematical sense.

    O-rings are nothing new. They have been around since the early 80s, anyone who rode in the 80s/90s would be familar with Biopace rings. I had a set in early 90s.

    There is *some* scepticism of their worth, not all PMs play nicely with them so suspicions of over reading. AFAIK for road cycling they are not hugely popular as they are seen to inhibit the ability to respond to attacks but are more popular with TTers.




  • I never fitted mine.:o Gathering dust I'm afraid.


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  • I've only read about them too Kurt, but have heard of some issues with shifting the front derailleur with them, kind of makes a bit of sense if you think of the shape of them. But like I say no experience of them and don't think I've seen any on a bike in person.




  • tunney wrote: »
    O-rings are nothing new. They have been around since the early 80s

    Thats what has me puzzled, after that amount of time you'd figure their benefit would have been either quantified or discounted by now. Yet the jury is still out on them. Lots of use during recent TdF TT's, Wiggins discounted them as a gimmick afterwards but still they get used by choice (a lot of riders have to use what the sponsors want and Osymetrics don't sponsor).




  • You would be better with standard rings to allow easy transfer of power meter between bikes.




  • FWIW I tried out the Osymetrics on a 3.5 hr ride today- they performed very well on the flat, you can just take off and it seems easier to maintain speed. Useful too going up small hills, I stayed in the saddle whereas I'd have stood up otherwise.

    I've no like-for-like comparison though, and there was a new bike involved which might well account for any benefit, but I found the turnover power of the O-rings very impressive.




  • I fitted them last year to the TT bike (only outside ring)
    I hated the feel of them at the start; the feeling of the crank slipping, then that odd feeling once I change down to the inner ring.

    Did feel like you got a bit extra speed for same p.e, I would like to try a 54/55 instead and see if the feeling of extra speed was just down to a larger chain ring.
    I also hear that there is problems with them and crank based power meters, the slight loss of power ever revolution can mess up the readings


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  • BennyMul wrote: »
    I fitted them last year to the TT bike (only outside ring)
    I hated the feel of them at the start; the feeling of the crank slipping, then that odd feeling once I change down to the inner ring.

    Did feel like you got a bit extra speed for same p.e, I would like to try a 54/55 instead and see if the feeling of extra speed was just down to a larger chain ring.
    I also hear that there is problems with them and crank based power meters, the slight loss of power ever revolution can mess up the readings

    I bought my bike from an ex pro, so I guess mine were fitted very well. They change better than any bike I've been on, although I can see how there is greater scope to slip.

    Like I said, I didn't have the PM on them, and thats where you'd expect quantifiable comparisons, although I've read about the same variance you've mentioned. So all that's left is my (limited) opinion: there's no slip, and they give a lot more speed and power for perceived effort.




  • Kurt Godel wrote: »
    FWIW I tried out the Osymetrics on a 3.5 hr ride today- they performed very well on the flat, you can just take off and it seems easier to maintain speed. Useful too going up small hills, I stayed in the saddle whereas I'd have stood up otherwise.

    I've no like-for-like comparison though, and there was a new bike involved which might well account for any benefit, but I found the turnover power of the O-rings very impressive.


    there is one study that showed that for first 3-4 weeks ( cant rember) power increases and then it flatens out to normal.
    I see it this way they are no game changer at all but certailnly for a low cadence person they do not make you slower. ( again no studies to realy proof that they make you faster ( and the one I have read that showes improvement is by a now rotor employee) .
    the thing is you have them on your bike now keep them espeially since you seem to like them.

    shifting is no issue to be fair.

    and i would think you still get a better power reading from them than from a stages power meter without oysymetric...but they inflate actual power




  • peter kern wrote: »
    the thing is you have them on your bike now keep them espeially since you seem to like them.

    Bang on the money Peter- whether its the rings, the bike, or the placebo; I like 'em and go faster with 'em. I'll keep them.

    I think they suit a masher (low cadence) rather than a spinner. From my limited observation of power as a crank is turned: most power when pedals are at 3oclock-9oclock position. That makes sense. Lease (zero) power at noon-6oclock position. That makes sense too. The O-rings seek to minimise the transition period between these positions, by elongating max power, and minimizing minimum. Just as I type that I realise I'm overanalysing again:); I'll keep them until they feel useless.




  • Kurt Godel wrote: »
    Bang on the money Peter- whether its the rings, the bike, or the placebo; I like 'em and go faster with 'em. I'll keep them.

    I think they suit a masher (low cadence) rather than a spinner. From my limited observation of power as a crank is turned: most power when pedals are at 3oclock-9oclock position. That makes sense. Lease (zero) power at noon-6oclock position. That makes sense too. The O-rings seek to minimise the transition period between these positions, by elongating max power, and minimizing minimum. Just as I type that I realise I'm overanalysing again:); I'll keep them until they feel useless.
    Personally I think it's more you win something on one hand and lose on the other hand . For some there might be a small advantage. And for others not a small loss and for many no change .And I totally hated the small ring oysemetric. And would be impartial to the big ring after a few weeks when I loved it .




  • peter kern wrote: »

    and i would think you still get a better power reading from them than from a stages power meter without oysymetric...but they inflate actual power

    agree 100% Peter, but for your own sake don't say that over in the cycling forum, you'll be chased out by a lynch mob with flaming torches




  • Used doval and osymmeyric. Could not see any difference between them and round ones.

    Doval are great bang for a buck and recommend to anyone to try them.

    Osymmetric are expensive and it takes few km to get used to them.

    P.S. best times I did using round chainring.


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