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I IV and V chords, any tips for memorising?

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,549 ✭✭✭ Lazare


    I've just starting learning about I IV and V chords in blues, I've always known certain chords work well together but I've just gotten around to figuring out which work with which.

    Has anyone got any tips on how to memorise IV and V chords without having to memorise the notation of every scale?

    Is there a CAGED type cheat?

    Also, what direction should I follow, now that I've discovered this beautiful thing? :)


Comments



  • Depending on how good...or bad.. your knowledge of basic theory is, you may learn something from this link:

    http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/57




  • Rigsby wrote: »
    Depending on how good...or bad.. your knowledge of basic theory is, you may learn something from this link:

    http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/57

    That's excellent, thanks v much Rigsby.

    There's a lot of it I can't understand right now, but I'm hungry to learn it.




  • Lazare wrote: »
    That's excellent, thanks v much Rigsby.

    There's a lot of it I can't understand right now, but I'm hungry to learn it.

    Glad you found it helpful. :) Without knowing how well up on theory you are, I'd recommend to start by learning how to harmonize the major scale. Every scale has it's own (diatonic) set of chords. A chord is made up by using every other (1,3,5,7 etc) note in a scale. Knowing about intervals is a "must" in understanding this.

    So, we will use the C maj scale and do what is called "stacking thirds" to get all it's diatonic (only using the notes from a given scale) chords.

    We will start from the bottom with the C maj scale, then the line above this will start with the third note from the one below.

    So, starting from the bottom and working our way up...


    FGABCDE
    DEFGABC
    BCDEFGA
    GABCDEF
    EFGABCD - E is the third note on the line below
    CDEFGAB = Cmaj scale

    Now, if we read form the bottom up, and read from left to right, we have all the diatonic chords (1-7) of the C maj scale.

    Reading three notes up gives us a triad....reading four notes up gives 7th chord (reading further gives extensions, but for now, it's best to stick with triads or 7th chords).

    Our first chord is Cmaj7 - CEGB
    The second is Dm - DFAC etc

    Why is the D chord minor and the C chord maj ? It is the third of a chord that determines if it is maj or minor. In the C chord, the interval between C and E is Maj third. In the D chord the interval between D and F is a minor third.

    The higher case romal numerals (as in I IV V etc ) etc indicate maj chords and the lower case (as in ii vii etc) indicate minor chords.

    Hope this is not all double dutch to you. :D If so, it would be best to learn some basic theory starting from ground zero.




  • Cheers man, I really appreciate the time you took.

    Gonna settle down now and absorb.

    Was at my first ever jam/recording session last night, as awesome as it was, I felt a little out of my depth at times, which is good I suppose, what do you get from being the best in the room? This will help me immensely for the next session.

    Thanks again. :)




  • Lazare wrote: »
    Cheers man, I really appreciate the time you took.

    Gonna settle down now and absorb.

    Was at my first ever jam/recording session last night, as awesome as it was, I felt a little out of my depth at times, which is good I suppose, what do you get from being the best in the room? This will help me immensely for the next session.

    Thanks again. :)

    You are welcome. :) Yes, I agree that it is not a bad thing to be a little out of your depth at times. It keeps you on your toes, and gives you the incentive to learn.

    One tip about learning theory....take it is small bite size chunks. Trying to cram in too much information at one sitting is futile and can lead to frustration.

    Having said the above, here is a link that explains theory, starting from the very basic and building from there.

    Enjoy......in moderation. ;)

    http://www.billygreen.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/Music%20Theory%20-%20Basic,%20Intermediate,%20Advanced.pdf


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