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dipLCM piano

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2 Pianomum


    I am currently teaching some piano students. I wish to do the diplcm in teaching piano to get my teaching diploma. However, most piano teachers i have asked have shied away from helping me. I'm beginning to think they haven't done any diplomas. However, I really need someone to tell me exactly whats expected of the 20 min teaching component and also the presentation component. What exactly are they looking for in these two parts of the exam? I wud hugely appreciate if someone cud help me out on this one.


Comments



  • Firstly, I haven't taken this diploma so don't any special insight here! :D

    Anyway.... I'm not sure what a teacher could tell you that the syllabus doesn't, even if they have taken this particular diploma. For the lesson, for example, the syllabus states,

    It is expected that the lesson will concentrate primarily on performance of graded or repertoire pieces; however, other areas may also be covered (eg. scales and arpeggios, sight reading, viva voce, aural tests, aspects of technique and interpretation, other tests as appropriate to the relevant LCM graded syllabus for the instrument, etc.).

    The marking scheme says:
    - Evidence of the candidate’s awareness and use of appropriate technical and musical concepts. 50%
    - The ability to articulate and express concepts clearly to the pupil. 50%


    The attainment descriptions later on in the syllabus refer to:

    - evidence of good/ excellent teaching skills, backed up by appropriate/ insightful knowledge and understanding of the relevant issues
    - solid technical accomplishment and musicality on their instrument or voice, as
    appropriate to the repertoire under consideration.
    - high levels of verbal accuracy & communication skills acceptable evidence of verbal articulacy and communication skills


    If I was preparing for this, I'd make sure they see my planned approach to the lesson; I would certainly include some sight reading/ technical work as well as working on pieces. I'd want to show that I can communicate well with the student, and explain terms/ techniques clearly using language/ images appropriate to the style of music and the student's age; that I have anticipated problems the student might have and have methods for working through them.

    I think there are plenty of teachers who don't have diplomas, what have the teachers you mentioned said when you ask them? Most schools seem to have biographies of their teachers online so if you want someone who has done this particular dip, you could do a search online? A good few teachers I know have a degree, whether it be performance, composition or musicology based, but not a teaching qualification.




  • rhapsody wrote: »
    Firstly, I haven't taken this diploma so don't any special insight here! :D

    Anyway.... I'm not sure what a teacher could tell you that the syllabus doesn't, even if they have taken this particular diploma. For the lesson, for example, the syllabus states,

    It is expected that the lesson will concentrate primarily on performance of graded or repertoire pieces; however, other areas may also be covered (eg. scales and arpeggios, sight reading, viva voce, aural tests, aspects of technique and interpretation, other tests as appropriate to the relevant LCM graded syllabus for the instrument, etc.).

    The marking scheme says:
    - Evidence of the candidate’s awareness and use of appropriate technical and musical concepts. 50%
    - The ability to articulate and express concepts clearly to the pupil. 50%


    The attainment descriptions later on in the syllabus refer to:

    - evidence of good/ excellent teaching skills, backed up by appropriate/ insightful knowledge and understanding of the relevant issues
    - solid technical accomplishment and musicality on their instrument or voice, as
    appropriate to the repertoire under consideration.
    - high levels of verbal accuracy & communication skills acceptable evidence of verbal articulacy and communication skills


    If I was preparing for this, I'd make sure they see my planned approach to the lesson; I would certainly include some sight reading/ technical work as well as working on pieces. I'd want to show that I can communicate well with the student, and explain terms/ techniques clearly using language/ images appropriate to the style of music and the student's age; that I have anticipated problems the student might have and have methods for working through them.

    I think there are plenty of teachers who don't have diplomas, what have the teachers you mentioned said when you ask them? Most schools seem to have biographies of their teachers online so if you want someone who has done this particular dip, you could do a search online? A good few teachers I know have a degree, whether it be performance, composition or musicology based, but not a teaching qualification.[/quot

    Dear rhapsody,
    Thank u so much for the detail u have put into the reply. I had of course read the syllabus but as an unconfident person wanted a bit of clarification and i suppose interpretation of it. I have a Musicology degree as well as a secondary hdiped as a music teacher many moons ago but i suppose i feel guilty about not having done a diploma specifically for piano. I'm so afraid of mucking up and turning to a nervous wreck that I am 50/50 as to whether I will do it or not.
    Again thank you for your reply. It has helped me.
    Pianomum x




  • With your musical background, I don't think you need to be nervous! It sounds like you have more pedagogical study than I had when I started working on my piano teaching diploma, and you have first hand experience from your current teaching. You'll learn loads studying for the diploma without even taking the exam, though after all that work, I imagine you'll want to take the exam!

    If you're not sure about the LCM one, look at the TCL, ABRSM and RIAM diplomas- they're all quite different and some have more practical sections than others. Even looking at other syllabi will help you get a feel for what different boards want from diploma candidates, which will help in preparing for whichever dip you go for.


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