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PENSION LEVY & SUPERANNUATION Charges to Substitute Teachers

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  • 17-11-2014 11:04am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 418 ✭✭


    I'm sure it's been discussed here before, but I'm having difficulty trying to get a proper answer. I've been a substitute secondary school teacher for several years, I've gotten plenty of work for maternity covers and other part-time jigs. Unfortunately there aren't that many permanent positions and as of yet, I haven't been able to get a permanent position. In the meantime, I'm paying the Pension Levy, SUPERANNUATION 1, SUPERANNUATION 5 and WIDOWS AND ORPHANS and it's my understanding even if I work as an almost fulltime substitute for 40 years, I still won't be eligible for a pension and if and when I ever become permanent, I will receive no credit for all of these deductions I've been paying into for over the past 6 years. Not to mention I have no Wife or children, so another tax I'm paying into where I'll never receive any benefit. Is this correct? If so, it sounds like it would be illegal in any other normal world, being taxed without receiving any benefit. Is there any way I can claim any of this back?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 13,409 ✭✭✭✭Geuze


    SeamusFX wrote: »
    In the meantime, I'm paying the Pension Levy, SUPERANNUATION 1, SUPERANNUATION 5 and WIDOWS AND ORPHANS and it's my understanding even if I work as an almost fulltime substitute for 40 years, I still won't be eligible for a pension and if and when I ever become permanent, I will receive no credit for all of these deductions I've been paying into for over the past 6 years. Not to mention I have no Wife or children, so another tax I'm paying into where I'll never receive any benefit. Is this correct? If so, it sounds like it would be illegal in any other normal world, being taxed without receiving any benefit. Is there any way I can claim any of this back?

    If you pay pension conts, then you will be entitled to some benefit.

    What makes you think otherwise?


  • Registered Users Posts: 418 ✭✭SeamusFX


    As far as I know (I could be wrong), part-time teachers are not eligible for a pension and if you later become a permanent teacher, your previous part-time hours will not be included in your pension calculations. According to http://www.asti.ie/pay-and-conditions/retirement-pensions/frequently-asked-questions/#questionone only part-time teachers appointed between 1 August 1996 and 1 September 2001 are eligible for a pension, I can’t find any other mention of pension benefits for non-permanent teachers.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15 eishaa


    All part time service given from 1 September 2001 is pensionable. Service prior to that is pensionable too but calculate depending on number of hours/type of contract. If you look up the FAQs on the departments website it tells you what service is pensionable and how to calculate same.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,382 ✭✭✭✭rainbowtrout


    SeamusFX wrote: »
    As far as I know (I could be wrong), part-time teachers are not eligible for a pension and if you later become a permanent teacher, your previous part-time hours will not be included in your pension calculations. According to http://www.asti.ie/pay-and-conditions/retirement-pensions/frequently-asked-questions/#questionone only part-time teachers appointed between 1 August 1996 and 1 September 2001 are eligible for a pension, I can’t find any other mention of pension benefits for non-permanent teachers.


    It's fairly clear cut on that FAQ that anyone that has done at least two years of work (Question 6) is entitled to a pension. All of the work you have done will go towards your pension.


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