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using cardboard as fuel

  • 22-07-2014 2:46pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    Guys,

    more a self sufficiency than survivalism post but still relevant. (i think anyway)

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Turn-newspapers-amp-junk-mail-back-into-logs/step8/Drying-time/

    Would the use of a cheap glue. maybe wallpaper paste at a high dilution make this work better??

    i was thinking of making something similar to this but compressing it using a hydraulic ram… would this work??

    also any ideas about how to make it longer burning??

    items i have free to my disposal are

    Time (albeit limited)
    paper
    Peat (scrapings of turf shed floor)
    sawdust (from local guys who sell timber)
    tractor & hydraulic power pack to push the ram.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,091 ✭✭✭ aaakev


    Why change it without trying it first? Iv seen something like this before and they burned pretty well. Try a few his way first I reckon then adjust it as you see fit


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    the type i was thinking of kev was more to wet the material and then compress suing a hydraulic ram into a briquette (similar to how bnm make the ones we buy)


  • Registered Users Posts: 460 ✭✭ iainBB


    I have that paper brick maker at home.
    Tried to produce about 100 paper bricks with it last year. all different methods.
    soaking the paper with and without bleach to break down the fibre
    candle wax added.
    Coffee grounds
    Wood dust.
    Even the type from the OP with a stick soaked in oil in the middle to help it burn.
    etc.

    Basically in the end that paper brick makes was not good enough to make good compact bricks. The burnt less than ok on a good fire and produced tons and tons of ash with very little heat
    with long time to dry

    I would try this method again but I would use a better homemade brick makers rather than the cheap ones, and ensure the paper it well separated with long soaks.
    i think this is better suited to an addition fuel source rather than main.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    i am planning on making mine with a hydraulic ram so the paper etc is well compacted and then varying the material to find a good mixture.

    Will knock up a drawing after work to show you what i mean.

    I think a hole in the centre would be best as it will let air circulate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 460 ✭✭ iainBB


    I agree, I saw a documentary in Africa where they had this simple put effective lever system made from wood to produce about 6 to 10 bricks at a time with a simple pastic sheet betweent them. they where selling the bricks out of it.

    This thing was massive and was made of tree trunks. I think it can be done. I got the free newspapers from Dublin town and use them.

    Please post a pic when you have it made. That might be my winter project


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    uncle of mine (the pair of us are always at stuff ike this) has one almost made up but not finished… well be fluting about with it on saturday. ill take some pics


  • Registered Users Posts: 20 fearghalcotter


    Any word back on those pics?


  • Registered Users Posts: 688 ✭✭✭ Boardnashea


    I love the comment at the bottom of step 8...:eek:


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,978 ✭✭✭ Stovepipe


    Don't these things work best in a close environment like a stove rather than on an open fire? Some of the commercially available pressed sawdust bricks are hopeless in an ordinary fireplace.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    Holy thread ressurection batman..... Ive finally done something about this and its on my blog.


    http://taketheguyoutofthecountry.wordpress.com/2015/01/10/my-first-attempt-at-creating-my-own-fuel/


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,214 ✭✭✭ chopper6


    Tried it years ago with acommercial press..nothing but smoke and ash..really just not worth the time or effort.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    chopper6 wrote: »
    Tried it years ago with acommercial press..nothing but smoke and ash..really just not worth the time or effort.

    What mixture did you use?


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,214 ✭✭✭ chopper6


    What mixture did you use?

    Newspaper and cardboard. The fact is that compressed paper just doesn't burn very well,even when completely dry( which takes months).


    It tends tends to smoulder and expand outwards,clogging the grate up with ash...try burning a phone book and you'll see what I mean.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,227 ✭✭✭ GY A1


    + I don't see the point in wetting paper and saw dust to then have to let it dry out.
    Like any other fuel if it's not completely dry that's wasting energy


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    GY A1 wrote: »
    + I don't see the point in wetting paper and saw dust to then have to let it dry out.
    Like any other fuel if it's not completely dry that's wasting energy


    have you ever harvested peat from the bog?? The water acts as a catalyst to make the whole thing stick together.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,214 ✭✭✭ chopper6


    have you ever harvested peat from the bog?? The water acts as a catalyst to make the whole thing stick together.

    But it needs to be dry to burn.

    Paper isn't peat..its not a hydrocarbon and does not burn when compressed


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    when soaked for the length of time i soaked it for it formed a mulch with the other ingredients i added.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,214 ✭✭✭ chopper6


    when soaked for the length of time i soaked it for it formed a mulch with the other ingredients i added.


    Did it burn and produce a lot of heat or did it smoulder and produce ash?


    You seem to be shilling an idea you think is great in principle but i can tell you in practise it simply wont work...tractors and hydraulic rams require a huge outlay of time and energy and the end result will not be worth it,thats assuming you can get hold of enough paper to make enough of these "briquettes".

    As for mixing glue in with the paper..it just dosnt make any sense.

    In my experience the only real way to burn sawdust,bits of paper and that sort of thing is to mix it into a slack with coaldust and bits of turf and it can then be applied damp to an already burning fire...this was used years ago to keep a fire stoked overnight for example.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,769 ✭✭✭ my3cents


    Sawdust >> Sawdust Burning Stove I've seen these in action and they really work. A local builders merchants gets them in to order.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    This is the process i used so far.


    Lately i have been looking at developing a fuel from some of the readily available materials we have at home (In ireland). These are:

    Waste paper & Cardboard
    Sawdust , a bi-product from when i chop pallets, timber etc for the solid fuel range.
    Peat, when the turf is used from the sheds there is often a layer of small bits of perfectly dry peat left in the shed. I have not used it in this mix but intend to in the future.
    Finally as we have two horses there is copious amounts of composted straw and dung in the heap…. Thats right i not only talk s**t, i also plan on burning it.

    I will list the process i have come up with thus far.

    I filled a large bucket/drum with waste paper and cardboard from all the christmas presents etc. To this i added water until the paper was immersed so that it could soak. This was stirred every day or so
    After a few days of water soakage i took well composted dung and added about 1/4 of a wheelbarrow full to the mix. This was again stirred every day or so.
    The material had now broken down into a very fine mush. As i was chopping pallets for the fire with the chainsaw i added in all the sawdust etc that was on the yard. I again stirred this until i was left with a mush of the material mixed together. Interestingly the cardboard & paper had completely broke down.
    Heres a pic of the mush as i found it today. It had soaked for a week whilst i was away chasing the pennies in Manchester. photo1_zpscda85ef8.jpg
    I had bought a “Briquette Maker” on ebay before xmas so this is what i used today. I will be making as more complex hydraulic one if these are succesfull. Pic: photo2_zpsd3038e4a.jpg
    With the aid of a plastic bag as i had no gloves I loaded in the “mulch” and then pressed it down to remove the water. photo3_zps11b7088c.jpg
    After the logs were made i placed them on a mesh rack to dry. I am hoping this will allow them to dry quickly as air can get to every section. photo4_zpse4895f0e.jpg

    I am hoping to let them dry for two weeks and then see how one burns in the stove. I will then tweak the mixture if needs be.


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 3,214 ✭✭✭ chopper6


    This is the process i used so far.


    Lately i have been looking at developing a fuel from some of the readily available materials we have at home (In ireland). These are:

    Waste paper & Cardboard
    Sawdust , a bi-product from when i chop pallets, timber etc for the solid fuel range.
    Peat, when the turf is used from the sheds there is often a layer of small bits of perfectly dry peat left in the shed. I have not used it in this mix but intend to in the future.
    Finally as we have two horses there is copious amounts of composted straw and dung in the heap…. Thats right i not only talk s**t, i also plan on burning it.

    I will list the process i have come up with thus far.

    I filled a large bucket/drum with waste paper and cardboard from all the christmas presents etc. To this i added water until the paper was immersed so that it could soak. This was stirred every day or so
    After a few days of water soakage i took well composted dung and added about 1/4 of a wheelbarrow full to the mix. This was again stirred every day or so.
    The material had now broken down into a very fine mush. As i was chopping pallets for the fire with the chainsaw i added in all the sawdust etc that was on the yard. I again stirred this until i was left with a mush of the material mixed together. Interestingly the cardboard & paper had completely broke down.
    Heres a pic of the mush as i found it today. It had soaked for a week whilst i was away chasing the pennies in Manchester. photo1_zpscda85ef8.jpg
    I had bought a “Briquette Maker” on ebay before xmas so this is what i used today. I will be making as more complex hydraulic one if these are succesfull. Pic: photo2_zpsd3038e4a.jpg
    With the aid of a plastic bag as i had no gloves I loaded in the “mulch” and then pressed it down to remove the water. photo3_zps11b7088c.jpg
    After the logs were made i placed them on a mesh rack to dry. I am hoping this will allow them to dry quickly as air can get to every section. photo4_zpse4895f0e.jpg

    I am hoping to let them dry for two weeks and then see how one burns in the stove. I will then tweak the mixture if needs be.


    A complete waste of time,space and energy.

    You'd be far better off composting those ingredients and using them on a stand of fast-growing trees such as ash.


    If you must burn dung it needs to be dry(as in lying in the desert dry) and used as found,not have water added to it along with a load of other useless ingredients.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    Back from uk tonight. The "logs" are bone dry now. Have just thrown three on the stove and there burning well


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,227 ✭✭✭ GY A1


    Back from uk tonight. The "logs" are bone dry now. Have just thrown three on the stove and there burning well

    Were they dried well. Aldi have a moisture meter at times. I Use it to check logs and turf now and again


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    GY A1 wrote: »
    Were they dried well. Aldi have a moisture meter at times. I Use it to check logs and turf now and again

    They are bone dry to be fair


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,799 ✭✭✭ Markcheese


    There's a stove/boiler available for burning bales of compressed cardboard , straw ect - something like the "candle method " or "candle burn" .
    Basically you fill it with bales of dry burnables and it burns from the top down rather than bottom up - these are big ugly yokes though that you'd put in a shed and run the central heating off -

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 3,647 ✭✭✭ Kevhog1988


    Markcheese wrote: »
    There's a stove/boiler available for burning bales of compressed cardboard , straw ect - something like the "candle method " or "candle burn" .
    Basically you fill it with bales of dry burnables and it burns from the top down rather than bottom up - these are big ugly yokes though that you'd put in a shed and run the central heating off -


    Old boss has one... we used to load every sort of ****e into it in fairness... hed no bin bills etc.


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