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Hillman Hunter possible restoration, advice

  • 08-04-2014 8:36am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    I have spent years on this forum on a daily basis. Of late its a once a week thing.
    Anyway todays question is
    I have been offered a 1973 Hillman Hunter. It is quite bad, though I have not yet looked in detail, certainly I could put my fingers through holes in the reaar lower wings.
    the things that attract me are
    A Hunters were one of the sturdiest cars on the road in their day. My pals mother had one and we drove the country in it. puilling a trailer. The mechanics of it are simple( ok so was everything then) and parts easily available I imagine.

    B it is local reg to me SIY , known history from new ,possibly old photos.I love old irish reg cars, am allergic to ZV s , cannot fully explain this ,even to myself.

    So on a brief look on ebay last night and donedeal, not a lot about, new old stock wings etc are nopt cheap, like at an estimate 1500 euro to buy what one would need.

    Have to run now , more later

    Regards


«1

Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 261 ✭✭ SeanSouth


    You can restore this car if you wish however the cost of restoring it will most likely far outweigh the value of the car when you're finished.

    Hillman Hunters in good nick exchange hands for very low money.


  • Registered Users Posts: 416 ✭✭ quattro777


    Hillman Hunters in good nick are very thin on the ground.
    The Hunter GLS is the most sought after along with the Hunter GT and Hillman GT.

    I'm restoring a Hunter GLS at the moment and will be doing another towards the end of the year.
    Expect the bottom 8 inches of the car all round to have the consistency of weetabix.

    Most parts are still available if you know where to look, front wings are £125-150.

    Take a look at what you are letting yourself in for!

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157630978140798/

    10279421666_f712a30c77.jpg

    10706050604_0ba89eb3b1.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭ jimmyw


    Congrats to anyone who decide to restore one of these cars and not the usual boring MGB and such like.I have a soft spot for these vehicles, (and sister car,the Avenger) popular with farmers certainly in my area anyway back in the their day.Their propensity to rust means they are certainly rare these days.Probably why Chrysler decided to build them here for the last 3 years of production they were so popular here.

    Maybe their might be parts available in Iran.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    Today I acquired this Hunter, SIY799, rusty all over but complete, pics later. Am going to get a few used , but airtight tyres today to make it rollable. The car is not a feasible project, nor is it a particularly nice model, however it is local, which means a bit to me. Tomorrow I intend to try and start it, engine is free, there is a starter button under the bonnet, oil looks ok.
    Dont know how long its laid up, it belonged to the late sister/aunt of the chap who gave it to me. The battery was fitted in 87, the mileage 72 k .

    I cannot see at this moment, who told me to expect the entire bottom of the car to be wheetabix, but that is a good description. My nephew, in whose yard it lies, temporarily, thinks I am mad.........he is right

    I note above that I reckoned earlier that 1500 would buy the body panels, if that were so and another 1500 paid labour, get it running myself, its like a meccanno kit , and paint it myself, car on road for 4 k euro, not too scary.

    Regards


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,069 ✭✭✭ Tzar Chasm


    They were building hunters in iran until 2005, as pakyans, they still build a 1600i in the Sudan.

    New parts shouldnt be an issue.


    seeing as you will most likely have to rebuild the car from the ground up have you considered updating the mechanicals?

    I have seen a few builds where someone strips the old car down to the bare chassis and then uses a donor vehicle, like an mx5 for modern running gear


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  • Registered Users Posts: 79 ✭✭✭ John Larkin


    Congratulations rugbyman!

    I too have a soft spot for old Irish registrations, and I admire your willingness to take on this project. I wish you well with the restoration. There'll be bad days when you feel like giving up, but the personal satisfaction will be worth it in the end. You will have preserved a piece of our Irish motoring heritage.

    Remember to post some photos!


  • Registered Users Posts: 416 ✭✭ quattro777


    Well done!

    If you need any help send me a PM.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    quattro777 wrote: »
    Well done!

    If you need any help send me a PM.

    Was intending to Quattro, had a look through your flickr restoration of a hunter
    Thank you


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    Attached is the car


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,069 ✭✭✭ Tzar Chasm


    Sweet mother of God, there doesn't seem to be enough metal left to even redeem it at scrap value.

    good luck sir, you have a serious project on your hands.

    that said if you feel like jacking it in I too have a soft spot for hunters.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    It was Quattro who mentioned bottom eight inches to be wheetabix, exactly right! Under the bonnet there is room around the engine to swing a cat,simple mechanics,yet these cars in their heyday were fast enough and sturdy enough.
    The rust is all round ....we will see...I have lots of unfinished projects,and un started ones. But this car is not now en route to Hammond lane


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    It was Quattro who mentioned bottom eight inches to be wheetabix, exactly right! Under the bonnet there is room around the engine to swing a cat,simple mechanics,yet these cars in their heyday were fast enough and sturdy enough.
    The rust is all round ....we will see...I have lots of unfinished projects,and un started ones. But this car is not now en route to Hammond lane


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,917 red sean


    Brave project Rugbyman, good luck with it.
    Always liked the Hunter and look forward to your updates!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,403 ✭✭✭ SpitfireIV


    jimmyw wrote: »
    Congrats to anyone who decide to restore one of these cars and not the usual boring MGB and such like....

    I say congrats to anyone who decides to restore a car, no matter what it is, its no small achievement! :P
    rugbyman wrote: »
    Today I acquired this Hunter, SIY799, rusty all over but complete, pics later. Am going to get a few used , but airtight tyres today to make it rollable. The car is not a feasible project, nor is it a particularly nice model, however it is local, which means a bit to me. Tomorrow I intend to try and start it, engine is free, there is a starter button under the bonnet, oil looks ok.
    Dont know how long its laid up, it belonged to the late sister/aunt of the chap who gave it to me. The battery was fitted in 87, the mileage 72 k .

    I cannot see at this moment, who told me to expect the entire bottom of the car to be wheetabix, but that is a good description. My nephew, in whose yard it lies, temporarily, thinks I am mad.........he is right

    I note above that I reckoned earlier that 1500 would buy the body panels, if that were so and another 1500 paid labour, get it running myself, its like a meccanno kit , and paint it myself, car on road for 4 k euro, not too scary.

    Regards

    Best of luck with it! ;) Dont forget, as well as the body panels youre prob gonna need a full interiror? Seats, carpet etc? Wiring loom? Brakes - shoes/pads, seals, gaskets, bushes etc etc, it all adds up, not to mention all the hours, the good days, the bad days :D Take a look at my Spitfire thread in the projects and builds section, I reckon its as comprehensive a restoration as you'll get and its still on going! ;)

    Looking forward to seeing more pics! :)


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,600 jca


    What engine does it have is it a 1500 cast iron head or is it the 1725 alloy head? Alloy heads being skimmed to death put a lot of them off the road in latter years. Brake components can be quite scare too being Lockheed as opposed to the more popular Girling of the time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,259 ✭✭✭ sogood


    jimmyw wrote: »
    Congrats to anyone who decide to restore one of these cars and not the usual boring MGB and such like.I have a soft spot for these vehicles, (and sister car,the Avenger) popular with farmers certainly in my area anyway back in the their day.Their propensity to rust means they are certainly rare these days.Probably why Chrysler decided to build them here for the last 3 years of production they were so popular here.

    Maybe their might be parts available in Iran.

    That's so unfair. "boring MGB"? I aquired an MGB restoration project this year and did so on the basis of it being a comfortable, relatively low cost entry into restoration. It has always been on my bucket list to do a resto and this little car fits the bill for me. There are a wealth of resources, owners, parts etc. available and I look forward to getting started on it. I'll be doing it as a hobby/pastime and making any sort of profit is not a consideration.

    I like the Hunter, but would never refer to it, or anybody elses' choice of project as boring or otherwise. Having said that, I would describe many peoples' daily drivers as boring, but that's an entirely different matter.

    I know you are entitled to your opinion, but please spare a thought for those about to enter into the minefield of restoration. It's a personal thing.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,778 ✭✭✭ rugbyman


    Today, having fitted 2 s/h tyres and inflated two long flat ones, I had the car pushable aroung, The brakes freed off easily, discs at front and drums to rear. On trying to move it I found the steering locked , so off i went to its former home of 18 years. Thats how long it lay up.
    Within minutes I had the key, a cup of tea ,and the tax book.
    the tax book informs me that it is a Chrysler, and had no model mentioned, but that it has a 1500 engine. By my old beliefs that suggests it is a Minx ,not a Hunter, but it says Hunter DL on the boot
    The ladies Aunt had bought it from new and it is parked up since 1996.
    I did have the neck to ask about photos and a search began.
    Among those found were pictures of the Aunt(who would be 92 years old if still alive) standing beside an early ZY 1xxx Minor and a ZY5xxx mini,
    Another of the Aunts Minor ZY9xxx, her Opel Kadett JIY, but to get photos of the hunter requires a trip to the attic to dig out more stuff. The Hunter was bought in Meehans, Dundalk( still there), the Kadet in Joe Larkins, (long closed) and the Minor in Lockingtons, (long closed)

    I have made the mistake of pulling cars apart before. I intend to get this one running first.

    The car never had four peoiple in it, the seats are in good condition but are an unattractive plastic'
    Regards


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,600 jca


    rugbyman wrote: »
    Today, having fitted 2 s/h tyres and inflated two long flat ones, I had the car pushable aroung, The brakes freed off easily, discs at front and drums to rear. On trying to move it I found the steering locked , so off i went to its former home of 18 years. Thats how long it lay up.
    Within minutes I had the key, a cup of tea ,and the tax book.
    the tax book informs me that it is a Chrysler, and had no model mentioned, but that it has a 1500 engine. By my old beliefs that suggests it is a Minx ,not a Hunter, but it says Hunter DL on the boot
    The ladies Aunt had bought it from new and it is parked up since 1996.
    I did have the neck to ask about photos and a search began.
    Among those found were pictures of the Aunt(who would be 92 years old if still alive) standing beside an early ZY 1xxx Minor and a ZY5xxx mini,
    Another of the Aunts Minor ZY9xxx, her Opel Kadett JIY, but to get photos of the hunter requires a trip to the attic to dig out more stuff. The Hunter was bought in Meehans, Dundalk( still there), the Kadet in Joe Larkins, (long closed) and the Minor in Lockingtons, (long closed)

    I have made the mistake of pulling cars apart before. I intend to get this one running first.

    The car never had four peoiple in it, the seats are in good condition but are an unattractive plastic'
    Regards

    Its a Hunter alright I think the minx name was long gone by 73. Being a 1500 DL doesn't exactly put it in the desirable category but at the end of the day sentimentality always plays a big part in any car. Does it have the wide chrome strip across the rear lights? Don't expect a day out in santa pod with that 1500 engine as it really struggled to pull all that British steel and with fuel consumption in the mid 20's days out can be fairly expensive. Best of luck. P.S. get a new diaphragm for that stromberg carburettor or it'll never start.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,901 ✭✭✭ Bigus


    Yeah get it running, and only tackle one panel at a time , keeping it mobile , and if it's structurally sound , do less rather than more, the new trend now is lacquer over the rat rust look !

    More pics please


  • Registered Users Posts: 530 ✭✭✭ unfit2006


    Hi Sogood,

    good choice with the MG. I restored a B and a few Midgets in times past and still have a hankering to have a go at another after this GT6 project of mine is on the road. MGs are a very rewarding car to work on and are a great introduction to classic motoring. Which model are you working on ?
    sogood wrote: »
    That's so unfair. "boring MGB"? I aquired an MGB restoration project this year and did so on the basis of it being a comfortable, relatively low cost entry into restoration. It has always been on my bucket list to do a resto and this little car fits the bill for me. There are a wealth of resources, owners, parts etc. available and I look forward to getting started on it. I'll be doing it as a hobby/pastime and making any sort of profit is not a consideration.

    I like the Hunter, but would never refer to it, or anybody elses' choice of project as boring or otherwise. Having said that, I would describe many peoples' daily drivers as boring, but that's an entirely different matter.

    I know you are entitled to your opinion, but please spare a thought for those about to enter into the minefield of restoration. It's a personal thing.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭ jimmyw


    sogood wrote: »
    That's so unfair. "boring MGB"? I aquired an MGB restoration project this year and did so on the basis of it being a comfortable, relatively low cost entry into restoration. It has always been on my bucket list to do a resto and this little car fits the bill for me. There are a wealth of resources, owners, parts etc. available and I look forward to getting started on it. I'll be doing it as a hobby/pastime and making any sort of profit is not a consideration.

    I like the Hunter, but would never refer to it, or anybody elses' choice of project as boring or otherwise. Having said that, I would describe many peoples' daily drivers as boring, but that's an entirely different matter.

    I know you are entitled to your opinion, but please spare a thought for those about to enter into the minefield of restoration. It's a personal thing.

    Look, I am a big fan of all classic cars of all descriptions and I agree about modern tat vehicles.They are far too complex and horrible to do any work on them.Give me a classic any day and I would be as happy as a sandboy.

    Just most resto work that I read about these days (PC mag for instance) seems to feature the MGB for instance among others.Now the advantage of these cars and others is that parts and experts are widely available, but wheres the challenge in that?:P.
    I dont hate these cars as such.Its even nice to see Austin allegros and other BL vehicles,ladas,fords etc.But its refreshing to see someone do a car thats not the norm, plus I do have a liking for thes cars of course as well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭ jimmyw


    rugbyman wrote: »
    Today, having fitted 2 s/h tyres and inflated two long flat ones, I had the car pushable aroung, The brakes freed off easily, discs at front and drums to rear. On trying to move it I found the steering locked , so off i went to its former home of 18 years. Thats how long it lay up.
    Within minutes I had the key, a cup of tea ,and the tax book.
    the tax book informs me that it is a Chrysler, and had no model mentioned, but that it has a 1500 engine. By my old beliefs that suggests it is a Minx ,not a Hunter, but it says Hunter DL on the boot
    The ladies Aunt had bought it from new and it is parked up since 1996.
    I did have the neck to ask about photos and a search began.
    Among those found were pictures of the Aunt(who would be 92 years old if still alive) standing beside an early ZY 1xxx Minor and a ZY5xxx mini,
    Another of the Aunts Minor ZY9xxx, her Opel Kadett JIY, but to get photos of the hunter requires a trip to the attic to dig out more stuff. The Hunter was bought in Meehans, Dundalk( still there), the Kadet in Joe Larkins, (long closed) and the Minor in Lockingtons, (long closed)


    I have made the mistake of pulling cars apart before. I intend to get this one running first.

    The car never had four peoiple in it, the seats are in good condition but are an unattractive plastic'
    Regards

    I am afraid I could not see all of your last pic, maybe my broadband connection is not up to it, I only saw the top half down to the wipers, so if you could slightly downsize them.But the minx was the same looking as the mk1 hunter, i.e single round headlamp.Chrysler models (and the previous hillman models) had the aluminium panel on the rear with twin headlights on the front.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,259 ✭✭✭ sogood


    jimmyw wrote: »
    Look, I am a big fan of all classic cars of all descriptions and I agree about modern tat vehicles.They are far too complex and horrible to do any work on them.Give me a classic any day and I would be as happy as a sandboy.

    Just most resto work that I read about these days (PC mag for instance) seems to feature the MGB for instance among others.Now the advantage of these cars and others is that parts and experts are widely available, but wheres the challenge in that?:P.
    I dont hate these cars as such.Its even nice to see Austin allegros and other BL vehicles,ladas,fords etc.But its refreshing to see someone do a car thats not the norm, plus I do have a liking for thes cars of course as well.

    I take your point and maybe at some time in the future, when finances and experience allow, I might tackle something more exotic or unusual. But the fact that so many MG's seem to be a popular resto, speaks volumes in itself.

    As stated, I want to cut my teeth and keep it "simple" if such a thing exists in the world of restorations! Anyway, I take my hat off to anybody who restores/saves any old timer from the crusher. These are, after all, the cars I grew up with. In fact, every car I owned for the first 25 years of my driving life, would now be considered classics.

    Thanks for the input.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,917 red sean


    The Hunter succeeded the Minx around 70/71 if my memory is right. It had a few subtle body/trim changes at the front end.
    The Hunter had square headlights and a single rectangular grille panel. Rugbymans car as photographed is the facelift model which came in around '73. It had a split grille and a 2 dial clock as against the long rectangular speedo of the original model.
    The model with large aluminium trim on the back arrived around '75/76 and also had a matching trim incorporating the grille and headlights.
    The (relatively rare) GLS and GT models sported 1725 engines and twin headlamps as well a four dial centre console not unlike the Cortina GXL.
    The Hunter was a very popular 'repmobile' at the time as well as being used as a tow vehicle by many tradesmen and farmers.

    Great to see what was once a common sight all over the country and now almost extinct, being restored.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,259 ✭✭✭ sogood


    unfit2006 wrote: »
    Hi Sogood,

    good choice with the MG. I restored a B and a few Midgets in times past and still have a hankering to have a go at another after this GT6 project of mine is on the road. MGs are a very rewarding car to work on and are a great introduction to classic motoring. Which model are you working on ?

    Hi and good luck with the GT6, there aren't too many of them about. I missed one last year and settled on the MGB GT. It was originally built in 1968 and I have the British Motor Industry Heritage Trust certificate for it, along with a ton of documentation, service records, repairs etc. and a heap of concours events certificates that it got in it's previous life in the UK.

    It underwent a total rebuild in the UK before coming to Ireland and is now registered as a 79 car, with brown log book and all the relevant paperwork.

    As I said, it's just a project and I won't necessarily adopt a "purist" approach, as I do with my daily driver. Some improvements and modifications are called for, but nothing crazy!

    Thanks for the interest and any advice/input would be much appreciated, although it will be well into the new year before I really start to get my hands dirty!


  • Registered Users Posts: 416 ✭✭ quattro777


    Hillman Minx 1967 - 1970

    hillman_minx_17.jpg

    Singer Gazelle VII 1967 - 1970
    Singer%20Gazelle%201969%20front.jpg

    Singer Vogue 1966 - 1970
    4052230.jpg

    Sunbeam Vogue (made for 6 months in 1970)

    sunbeam_vogue.jpg

    Humber Sceptre

    url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&docid=WEoWkUiFZmNhPM&tbnid=L4pT0U5VSGd7aM:&ved=0CAUQjBw&url=http%3A%2F%2F1.bp.blogspot.com%2F-Ign8O4L2KDk%2FTnuSNdU-6eI%2FAAAAAAAADx4%2FRVq58NFpc8A%2Fs1600%2F6069442106_5cf886fce8_b.jpg&ei=up4gVL_mJMPe7AarnoDwCg&psig=AFQjCNEKGE74ry5Dcgd9OMS0cwfYxHRXGw&ust=1411510330692599

    url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&docid=WEoWkUiFZmNhPM&tbnid=vjCTPbT3VoDOeM:&ved=0CAUQjBw&url=http%3A%2F%2F3.bp.blogspot.com%2F-5i_PTEs0154%2FTnuSOO_tDzI%2FAAAAAAAADyA%2Fo97rPHkcDz8%2Fs1600%2F6086390728_5bc76b0491_b.jpg&ei=u54gVJy0Ioaf7ga_soGIDA&psig=AFQjCNHVMIOj6Y0zvhCtWPrFnOX77H49jA&ust=1411510331660833


    Hillman Hunter

    Hillman%20Hunter%201967%20front.jpg

    Sunbeam Hunter (Export)

    SSLP0953_zpsf5de4e1a.jpg

    03.jpg

    Sunbeam Sceptre

    57bc_480.jpg

    Sunbeam Arrow

    Sunbeam-2.png

    Hillman Hunter (face lift)

    hillman_hunter_15.jpg

    hillman_hunter_5.jpg

    Hillman Hunter GLS 1972 1975

    Hunter3_zps604f0678.jpg?1411424052145&1411424057345

    Hunter2_zpsba0e253c.jpg?1411424052145&1411424057345


  • Registered Users Posts: 416 ✭✭ quattro777


    1975 Hillman Hunter

    4586541322_ffe990f87a_z.jpg

    LMY-Topaz-1.JPG

    Chrysler Hunter
    chrysler-hunter-01.jpg

    Chrysler-hunter-3.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭ jimmyw


    You've covered most of the range there Quattro777..:p

    The amount of badge engineering that went went on with manufacturers back then in the 70s was laughable.

    The front of the Chrysler Hunter,is basicly a slight variation on the GLS.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/be216cd1/9460070711/in/photolist-kp1BAT-fpXkrr-aDVPte-ewX7T4-aDZKQG-bv5zE8-ex1jfy-aDZHGU-ewX5Ac-aDVRWc-9YJj1m-7TfRWZ-di5RZ5-7Tj7KQ-ftPwuK-fu4SnG-ftPwzF-7Tf5EV-7Tf5ve-aDVNmB-fu4SdW-8UGBHZ-6woXvq-7GEBei-btHevF-egwEaA-9hh8Hg-b6KGgP-9rwkXt-8BaGji-5FK5uo-7kR1mD-8KgCLD-8LiJ5t-c6pa5Y-bDhdxC-egqTWM-egqUeT-egwDHU-bv5znR-e5qaS4-ftPwGn-7Tgu7F-7TfS5B-axuBmt-axuBaP-7Tgucz-5jCXnm-7X3xg-dvUFMx/

    There used to be two chrysler 1500s across a few of the fields from me but one of them is gone, the other has a pile of stones on its bonnet.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157644185468304/

    On the left 2 are later date, right 2 are a good few earlier years before.Extreme right 1 is the one thats gone.

    We used to have a blue mk2 hunter (pre facelift) in the late 70s early eighties.I was fascinated just looking at the back end in the garage as a child for some reason back then and a 1978 Chrysler Hunter too in the eighties (same colour as in the pics).


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,069 ✭✭✭ Tzar Chasm


    We also had a baby blue early model hunter, I remember the linear speedo.

    rusted away in the garden some time in the eighties after the axel was used to make a trailer


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,383 ✭✭✭ jimmyw


    OP, I for one want to see loads of pics (smaller if possible), or they will be hell to pay, so be warned.:D


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