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SolidWorks- Surfacing - Kettle

  • #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 63 ✭✭✭ Berteee


    Hi ,

    I have to make this on SolidWorks. I am not great at with CAD and would know if
    anyone could be of some help. I tried Youtube and unfortunately there are no tutorials for this.

    Thank You


Comments



  • I'm only learning Surfacing myself at the moment so can't give you any help on doing it that way.

    What you could try is do create the kettle body by using a loft. It's a simple shape in the youtube video but will give you the idea.



    I would leave the handle area filled in for the loft and then create the handle space by either a cut extrusion or cut loft depending on it's geometry. From the pic it looks like a cut extrusion would work as it looks like a straight through cut, nothing fancy.

    For the lid/upper surface of the kettle a horizontal cut extrusion will get the shape for you and then for the lid handle/on off switch if you offset a workplane you'll be able extrude or cut extrude into it.




  • How accurate do you need the surface to be? What do you need to use it for?

    If you could get it mapped with a CMM you can bring it in to solidworks as a dumb solid then clean it up.

    Do you mind destroying it? cut it in half on a band saw and put it on a flat bed scanner. Then bring this image into solidworks as a jpg, make sure its scaled correctly, use this as a guideline to sketch some guide curves.

    The other option is to take enough measurements it should be possible to construct the basic skin in solid-works using surfacing lofts.




  • CatFromHue wrote: »
    I'm only learning Surfacing myself at the moment so can't give you any help on doing it that way.

    The most important feature of surfacing is pretty much covered in the example loft video you've posted. It seems very daunting at first, but its not too bad and allows a lot more freedom in a design.
    When modelling complex 3D geometry, surfacing is the best way around it. And to be perfectly honest, I don't think this kettle can be modelled in a simpler way.

    BigJohn1963, are you looking to reverse engineer a product, or is this a project for college?
    As its complex geometry, there is no way of measuring other than CMM as recommended by DublinDilbert. But in saying that, you would have a solid body with no features or parameters to it. Essentially, it'll just be like an imported step or iges file.

    The only other way around it would be to try and import the outlines of the kettle into 2D sketches, and use them to create a surface model.
    I would try and get 2D cad files of the kettle's specification sheet. Some manufacturers would have a manual in pdf format and within it should be 2D drawings.
    They could then be converted to dwg or dxf format with the correct software and imported into solidworks. Alternatively (and slightly more crudely), you could take photos from the sides of the kettle and import them into CAD and adjust to the correct scale. From there, trace the edges and then follow this video (watch all parts) to align the sketches on sketch planes.

    Its pretty complex cad work to be honest. I wouldn't like to chance it without the proper experience, but good luck all the same.




  • Shy Ted wrote: »
    The most important feature of surfacing is pretty much covered in the example loft video you've posted. It seems very daunting at first, but its not too bad and allows a lot more freedom in a design.
    When modelling complex 3D geometry, surfacing is the best way around it. And to be perfectly honest, I don't think this kettle can be modelled in a simpler way.

    BigJohn1963, are you looking to reverse engineer a product, or is this a project for college?
    As its complex geometry, there is no way of measuring other than CMM as recommended by DublinDilbert. But in saying that, you would have a solid body with no features or parameters to it. Essentially, it'll just be like an imported step or iges file.

    The only other way around it would be to try and import the outlines of the kettle into 2D sketches, and use them to create a surface model.
    I would try and get 2D cad files of the kettle's specification sheet. Some manufacturers would have a manual in pdf format and within it should be 2D drawings.
    They could then be converted to dwg or dxf format with the correct software and imported into solidworks. Alternatively (and slightly more crudely), you could take photos from the sides of the kettle and import them into CAD and adjust to the correct scale. From there, trace the edges and then follow this video (watch all parts) to align the sketches on sketch planes.

    Its pretty complex cad work to be honest. I wouldn't like to chance it without the proper experience, but good luck all the same.


    The Only Experience I have is bringing in a Jpeg and trying to draw one side of an object. Then try to Mirror from that side and cut/extrude. I have to also create One part fully correct. Im thinking of the Lid, so it can lift up and show inside parts




  • Is this for college or for work?


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  • CatFromHue wrote: »
    Is this for college or for work?

    College Assignment. 50% Of Module .




  • Did you pick the kettle yourself or was it assigned?
    If you picked it, I would look at a teapot instead.

    Modelling a kettle is extremely tough as it has complex curvatures.




  • I'd ask the lecturer about using surfacing techniques so. Certainly when I was in uni it was never taught or mentioned I think and even in industry I've never encountered it so far. This is in the mech industry, could be different for product/industrial design.




  • I agree CatFromHue, surfacing wasn't taught when I was at college. The most advanced we got to was lofts.

    OP, I would strongly advise looking at an object with basic geometries. At least you might be able to measure the features.
    Surfacing is a very advanced level of solidworks, and is primarily used for moulded components made from plastic, composites and stamped metals.
    The only way of accurately measuring is by using CMM, which is hard to come by.

    If you want to develop a competency in using solidworks for future employment, I think you would benefit more from mastering standard part features and assemblies. Being able to look an object and determine what is the best approach to modelling it takes experience. but there are excellent tutorials available online from solidworks, youtube and also grabcad.

    You might even find a tutorial on an item that you could replicate for your project??




  • Shy Ted wrote: »
    I agree CatFromHue, surfacing wasn't taught when I was at college. The most advanced we got to was lofts.

    OP, I would strongly advise looking at an object with basic geometries. At least you might be able to measure the features.
    Surfacing is a very advanced level of solidworks, and is primarily used for moulded components made from plastic, composites and stamped metals.
    The only way of accurately measuring is by using CMM, which is hard to come by.

    If you want to develop a competency in using solidworks for future employment, I think you would benefit more from mastering standard part features and assemblies. Being able to look an object and determine what is the best approach to modelling it takes experience. but there are excellent tutorials available online from solidworks, youtube and also grabcad.

    You might even find a tutorial on an item that you could replicate for your project??

    I picked this myself. One day we were given a picture of the an object and put it into solid works, sketched one side , made a new plane and then mirrored the object. I will try to take as many measurements as possible and get some help off someone with experience hopefully.


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  • I picked this myself. One day we were given a picture of the an object and put it into solid works, sketched one side , made a new plane and then mirrored the object. I will try to take as many measurements as possible and get some help off someone with experience hopefully.

    I think those with experience are trying to tell you that it'll be a b1tch to do with surfaces.
    As it's not for production but to show off what you learned in class I'd draw a couple of cross sections for the body, loft them and create a shell. Add ribs, mounting bosses or whatever. For the handle and extruded cross section and fillet into the main body. Create holes for light, switch, socket, element.
    BTW You never said if the project outcome or aim was to simply model a shape, to create a drawing of a manufacturable part or to create a full assembly




  • KAGY wrote: »
    I think those with experience are trying to tell you that it'll be a b1tch to do with surfaces.
    As it's not for production but to show off what you learned in class I'd draw a couple of cross sections for the body, loft them and create a shell. Add ribs, mounting bosses or whatever. For the handle and extruded cross section and fillet into the main body. Create holes for light, switch, socket, element.
    BTW You never said if the project outcome or aim was to simply model a shape, to create a drawing of a manufacturable part or to create a full assembly

    I have a solution .

    I've to make a GA and then do an animation of the Lid (Top) Part moving.




  • How did you get on anyway?


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