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Giving to homeless people on the street.

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4 POWERTON


    Hi there I just want to get everyones opinion on the topic of giving money to people on the streets, today I was in Cork city doing a bit of shopping when i noticed a homeless guy sitting down by the Pauls st Shopping centre, It was raining and the he was sitting on the ground and my heart sank. I never give to people on the street, I don't now why, if I'm honest part of me believes that it'll be wasted on booze or drugs. But I have mulled this over time and time and who am i really to judge, Ive got a good life, I have a family that would support me no matter what. Ive alway worked for what I have, but if i didn't have the support of my friends and family, would I cave when time(which we all face) get hard.

    Anyway I passed the guy, did my shopping and couldn't shake him from my mind, so I went back and said to my self if he was still there i'd give him enough to buy breakfast. He was and I dropped some money in his coffee cup and I still feel torn.

    Jus wonder what are your views??


Comments



  • POWERTON wrote: »
    Hi there I just want to get everyones opinion on the topic of giving money to people on the streets, today I was in Cork city doing a bit of shopping when i noticed a homeless guy sitting down by the Pauls st Shopping centre, It was raining and the he was sitting on the ground and my heart sank. I never give to people on the street, I don't now why, if I'm honest part of me believes that it'll be wasted on booze or drugs. But I have mulled this over time and time and who am i really to judge, Ive got a good life, I have a family that would support me no matter what. Ive alway worked for what I have, but if i didn't have the support of my friends and family, would I cave when time(which we all face) get hard.

    Anyway I passed the guy, did my shopping and couldn't shake him from my mind, so I went back and said to my self if he was still there i'd give him enough to buy breakfast. He was and I dropped some money in his coffee cup and I still feel torn.

    Jus wonder what are your views??

    I try to give homeless people food or a cup of coffee instead of money.




  • Ive discussed this with a friend, and I would of originally bought them food, but she (who works regularly with the homeless) reckons its a bit patronizing and takes away their right to choice.




  • Everyone assumes it will be wasted on alcohol etc. It might be most of the time. Giving food or coffee is usually better alright. Having read some of the "Humans of new York" book/page. The interviews with homeless people are really interesting. It really goes to show sometimes people are just really down on their luck and havent just wasted their life with drink/drugs.




  • Im begining to see it that way my self, I lived and studied in the uk when i was younger, and people were so obviously high on drugs when they were begging, I think this skewed my view, I feel in recently light of some of the charity scandals we a society might be better off cutting out the middle man, looking closer to home and giving to people on the streets. I whole heartily back charities like St Vincent de Paul and Soup Kitchen like twist in Galway (although the may be gone now) but I think I'm going to look out more for people in the street.




  • If I was freezing cold, on the street, possibly in the pissing rain. If I was as low as I've ever been, and felt that hope had left me, I wouldn't want a sandwich from you. Nor an americano with slim-line milk.

    I would most likely be grateful for a bag of heroin and a naggin of jemmy, and a few fags if they were going.

    But I do enjoy those who insist on buying food for those who don't want it.
    And then declaring that to give them money is a 'waste'


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  • No Kid at 18 yrs of age decided to make a career of begging and to become an alcoholic as a pastime. Most people who live like this have had a tough background. Many were raised in abusive homes or in residential homes others were victims of repeated violence and sexual abuse and their lives are not pleasant. If I give a few euro to someone and he gets some cheap booze to deaden the pain for a while, then thats ok with me.




  • Everybody says he might spend it on booze so they would have to think about it.
    But so what if they spend it on booze? let them grab relief where they can.




  • I posted about something similiar ages ago and didn't get a great response.... I dont give to homeless either but same thing there was a bloke outside my job all day in the rain. He was on my mind. Honestly; I didn't want to give money incase it was spent on drugs or drink and I figured a sambo or cuppa might be on other peoples minds too so I decided to buy him a blanket (his was soaked and it was to be a cold night) - I only had €15 and couldnt find a blanket so I got him a new sleeping bag.

    I gave it to him figured he could at least sit on it instead of the ground but he told me I was stupid and should have given him money for a meal instead.... he asked me for the receipt.

    Never again. I will probably walk past someone today that needs something but I will be reluctant for the rest of my days. You give what you can give and its a choice to do that.

    Fair play to you... sadly, I'm starting to believe that charity should begin at home.




  • POWERTON wrote: »
    I feel in recently light of some of the charity scandals we a society might be better off cutting out the middle man, looking closer to home and giving to people on the streets. I whole heartily back charities like St Vincent de Paul and Soup Kitchen like twist in Galway (although the may be gone now) but I think I'm going to look out more for people in the street.
    If it is left up to citizens to give to the homeless on the streets then it sadly won’t ever be enough to replace what many reputable charities do. The ‘middle man’ which makes up many different services have resources which can be utilised unlike what private citizens can typically offer. For instance, are you really going to offer a homeless person your spare bedroom? Few people would and will instead give them money and hope they can afford to get a hostel, etc. But then what? They’re back on the street the next day needing more money.

    Rather than giving money to the person why not just continue to donate any money to the actual services that are out for the homeless - The Simon Community, etc.? This way, at least you can be assured that your money will go towards helping the homeless get their lives back.
    macker33 wrote: »
    Everybody says he might spend it on booze so they would have to think about it. But so what if they spend it on booze? let them grab relief where they can.
    Perhaps it’s because people would rather not contribute to something which is possibly going to keep a person homeless? It might bring short term relief, yes, but in the long term you’re looking at fuelling an addiction, which is not going to help someone’s prospects. It’s why homeless shelters don’t give out free booze to the people they work with for ‘relief’ because it will likely compound their issues and contribute to long-term suffering.




  • Perhaps it’s because people would rather not contribute to something which is possibly going to keep a person homeless? It might bring short term relief, yes, but in the long term you’re looking at fuelling an addiction, which is not going to help someone’s prospects. It’s why homeless shelters don’t give out free booze to the people they work with for ‘relief’ because it will likely compound their issues and contribute to long-term suffering.

    De Paul allow their service users to drink.

    Harm Reduction rather than prevention is fast becoming the dominant (and only sensible) paradigm


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  • Indeed, though I would add that ‘allowing service users to drink’ and actively giving them drink are two very different things. The needle exchange programmes are great too but, again, they are not supplying addicts with the drugs, only the facilities for them to do so as safely as possible.




  • Indeed, though I would add that ‘allowing service users to drink’ and actively giving them drink are two very different things. The needle exchange programmes are great too but, again, they are not supplying addicts with the drugs, only the facilities for them to do so as safely as possible.

    More's the shame.

    If we could just take another little leap forward and provide addicts with their substance of choice on a prescription basis, we could alleviate even more of the harm associated with their addictions.

    Providing shelter is great. But allowing vulnerable individuals spend their days on the hunt for illicit substances without access to safe substances and/or money is problematic (to say the least).




  • I give money to the homeless if I have some spare change.

    You'd be surprised just how fast anyone can end up in that horrible situation.

    Many would be junkies/alcoholics but then again many would not, I don't know how my change would help them but if I can spare it I will.




  • Sadderday I remember your opening post it was on the same subject. For the op it was posted on the 23/2/2013. I took quite a lot of time to type down exactly wot was wrong with not only YOUR point of view but also YOUR actions regarding the homeless person you tried to help out that day may I ask what is still troubling you about it?? its over a year ago now like




  • bigmac147 wrote: »
    Sadderday I remember your opening post it was on the same subject. For the op it was posted on the 23/2/2013. I took quite a lot of time to type down exactly wot was wrong with not only YOUR point of view but also YOUR actions regarding the homeless person you tried to help out that day may I ask what is still troubling you about it?? its over a year ago now like


    Never mind bigmac147 - not worth the hassle




  • MaxWig wrote: »
    De Paul allow their service users to drink.

    Harm Reduction rather than prevention is fast becoming the dominant (and only sensible) paradigm

    Cannot agree with this statement, although I fully support the Harm Reduction method, I work with Low Threshold and Harm Reduction clients, so I do understand where your're coming from.

    Prevention is a viable option and method of working, and is one of the pillars as set down by The Regional and Local Drug Task Forces.

    In fact, many of the community based treatment programmes are moving away from Harm Reduction interventions, in favor of Stabilization and Drug Free cohorts. Although, this is mainly happening within the Special Category Community Employment scheme projects, the two main treatment facilities in the city are also doing this, it is one I don't agree with, but funders must be kept happy.

    I do hold conflicting feelings regarding the whole situation, in one way I think a free drug scheme should be available to individuals, but I also feel the amount of enabling here would reflect the Methadone Maintenance Treatment programmes, and keep people in the behaviour, for a longer period than necessary




  • dar100 wrote: »
    Cannot agree with this statement, although I fully support the Harm Reduction method, I work with Low Threshold and Harm Reduction clients, so I do understand where your're coming from.

    Prevention is a viable option and method of working, and is one of the pillars as set down by The Regional and Local Drug Task Forces.

    In fact, many of the community based treatment programmes are moving away from Harm Reduction interventions, in favor of Stabilization and Drug Free cohorts. Although, this is mainly happening within the Special Category Community Employment scheme projects, the two main treatment facilities in the city are also doing this, it is one I don't agree with, but funders must be kept happy.

    I do hold conflicting feelings regarding the whole situation, in one way I think a free drug scheme should be available to individuals, but I also feel the amount of enabling here would reflect the Methadone Maintenance Treatment programmes, and keep people in the behaviour, for a longer period than necessary

    Hi DAr100,

    My understanding was that prevention fell under the Harm Reduction approach.

    For me, one of the main failings of the Harm Reduction approach in general is that it fails to reach the large majority of drug users.

    As long as harm reduction programmes exist within the broader context of a society in which drug use is normalised and accepted, then those programmes will always be on the back foot.

    BTW I would not in any way suggest that I have the knowldge or experience that you have in this area, so I post this more as a question than as a declaration :)

    I have my own doubts about Prescription Drug Programmes, but I just cannot accept that the current situation is viable.

    It is immoral for one. But at a practical level, it seems to me to be unworkable.




  • MaxWig wrote: »
    Hi DAr100,

    My understanding was that prevention fell under the Harm Reduction approach.

    For me, one of the main failings of the Harm Reduction approach in general is that it fails to reach the large majority of drug users.

    As long as harm reduction programmes exist within the broader context of a society in which drug use is normalised and accepted, then those programmes will always be on the back foot.

    BTW I would not in any way suggest that I have the knowldge or experience that you have in this area, so I post this more as a question than as a declaration :)

    I have my own doubts about Prescription Drug Programmes, but I just cannot accept that the current situation is viable.

    It is immoral for one. But at a practical level, it seems to me to be unworkable.

    Hi Maxwig,

    Prevention falls into a number of categories; Supply reduction/Demand Reduction, with the former been achieved through the criminal justice system, and the later through treatment, education etc.

    To be realistic on the matter, Harm Reduction approaches are needed, health benefits, stopping the spread of blood borne virus etc.




  • dar100 wrote: »
    Hi Maxwig,

    Prevention falls into a number of categories; Supply reduction/Demand Reduction, with the former been achieved through the criminal justice system, and the later through treatment, education etc.

    To be realistic on the matter, Harm Reduction approaches are needed, health benefits, stopping the spread of blood borne virus etc.

    Agreed.

    Reading the statement you commented on, I can see I worded it poorly.

    "Harm Reduction rather than demanding Abstinence...." is what I meant.




  • MaxWig wrote: »
    Agreed.

    Reading the statement you commented on, I can see I worded it poorly.

    "Harm Reduction rather than demanding Abstinence...." is what I meant.

    I totally agree with you, unfortunately some models only advocate, and often demand abstinence. IMO, this is why people often fall through the cracks and disengage with treatment.

    I am often confounded as to how some people train in the area, and then forget about Evidence Based Practice, although this does bring up the question of how low the standards are for individuals to gain employment in the addiction field.


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  • MaxWig wrote: »
    If I was freezing cold, on the street, possibly in the pissing rain. If I was as low as I've ever been, and felt that hope had left me, I wouldn't want a sandwich from you. Nor an americano with slim-line milk.

    I would most likely be grateful for a bag of heroin and a naggin of jemmy, and a few fags if they were going.

    But I do enjoy those who insist on buying food for those who don't want it.
    And then declaring that to give them money is a 'waste'
    good luck with that you would not get heroin/naggin from me. that would only feed addiction. sandwich might make you feel like going to better yourself/get job/house. unless heroin is all you would want in that case good luck so long as i am not paying. If people want to shoot up let them. some people have to work to get through life


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