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Crossfit

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  • Registered Users Posts: 613 ✭✭✭SeaDaily


    Hey, What are yer views on Crossfit? I'm just trying to gauge general views and perceptions for some research I am doing!

    I think it is an overpriced, very well marketed way of taking money from people. It is just glorified Olympic lifting in my opinion with a few additional exercises thrown in for good measure. It might work for a select group of people who have literally no self-motivation but other than that it totally pointless.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,679 ✭✭✭hidinginthebush


    It largely depends on where you do it. From what I've read it's not too hard to become a trainer in cf, so some of the people teaching it are having people lifting with terrible form. Plus they seem to put kipping pullups above actual pullups.

    Over-priced, but if you have a one of the good places doing it, could be worth your while if the motivation it provides justifies the price.


  • Registered Users Posts: 168 ✭✭Stillweak


    Its got some great points and some bad points.

    Ignore the coach qualifications. Is hes good, hes good. If hes bad hes bad. Wheather it took him a day course or a 3 year degree course to get ''qualified'' is irrelivant.
    The real education doesnt come in a class room or seminar.

    The Good

    - Its good fun
    - gets you fitter and stronger
    - the group mentality does make you work harder
    - for average people they will do things they never thought they could do
    - you will probably make some friends
    - it will lead tou you eating better and drinking less

    The Bad

    - you will talk about crossfit non stop
    - you might turn into a paleo geek
    - you will probably feel you are a professional athlete. Youre not.
    - there is so much cheating in every crossfit gym ( to get better score on white board )
    - injuries are likely

    The worst

    - A lot of people who should be playing real sport are wasting their talent in crossfit and normal gyms


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 Crossfit Corcaigh


    Thanks for the replies lads,

    One more question. If you were considering joining what would you be looking for? i.e what are the priorities. Or if you have participated in crossfit like activities what would you change about it? Cheers


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,679 ✭✭✭hidinginthebush


    I can't really comment too much on this, but make sure you go to a place that puts a strong emphasis on form. By brother in law goes to a place that you'll get collared if you start compromising form to get through a set. I think the main criticism on CF is that it uses olympic lifts in a circuit training scenario, so you have to try to rush through a set of exercises that you should take your time getting done. Though that can all be taken with a large grain of salt.

    To be honest, you are in the right place to be asking these question, the lads in this forum will be able to input more on the potential dangers of doing strong lifts with bad form or impatience. Though you could also search the fitness form. Here's a pretty funny,tongue in cheek overview of crossfit:


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,287 ✭✭✭davyjose


    I think this:

    Squat_Death.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 36,263 ✭✭✭✭LuckyLloyd


    Thanks for the replies lads,

    One more question. If you were considering joining what would you be looking for? i.e what are the priorities. Or if you have participated in crossfit like activities what would you change about it? Cheers

    - Focus on strength. Program the compound lifts with the objective of getting progressively stronger at them;
    - One size fits all programming is dumb. Yes, everyone can do the same movements on the same day, but a beginner to weight training doesn't need to be doing percentage work or 1 rep max tests. They should be doing linear progression for their first ~half year. Similarly, scale metcons and where scaling defeats the purpose of a metcon program more than one for an individual day;
    - If you want to program Olympic lifting dedicate the required time to it. Have a day or two a week where people come in and focus on the two lifts and associated assistance for an hour. If your Snatch programming is 15 minutes one day a week + reps thrown into metcons where people are gassed and fatigued you may as well not program them at all imo;
    - Rebounding box jumps; deadlift sumo high pulls; super high rep 'chipper' metcons are dumb, don't program them;

    In general, think about risk versus reward in terms of your client's training. There's a fine line of course, some people are joining because they think Crossfit is cool and they genuinely want to a version of the competitive sport of Crossfit. Other people just want to get fitter / move better / look better. As such, maybe teaching and programming Power Cleans could make more sense than full cleans; Power Snatches rather than full snatches; strict pull ups rather than kipping, etc:

    http://powerathletehq.com/2013/12/17/power-pulls-performance/

    Finally, think about the type of training environment you want to create. In an ideal world, a beginner will understand that they need to start light and slow, learn the movements etc and feel comfortable being in the same facility as guys deadlifting 200+ who hit the hardest metcons with intensity. And EVERYONE should be mindful of good movement and form. If your programming and coaching is right, people in the former will consistently morph into the latter over a long time scale.

    Now, that's just my opinion of course. Best of luck with your box whatever you do. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 3 Crossfit Corcaigh


    -snip- I allowed the feedback but no advertising please


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,455 ✭✭✭FastFullBack


    -snip-

    Just curious why you dont have mentioned anywhere on the facebook page where exactly the gym is located. This is surely a top factor for anyone joining the gym.


  • Registered Users Posts: 24,586 ✭✭✭✭Alf Veedersane


    Just curious why you dont have mentioned anywhere on the facebook page where exactly the gym is located. This is surely a top factor for anyone joining the gym.

    There is no gym:

    "This is a business concept for a social media strategy for college and is NOT OFFICIAL."


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  • Registered Users Posts: 432 ✭✭TGJD


    Hey, What are yer views on Crossfit? I'm just trying to gauge general views and perceptions for some research I am doing!

    Crossfit places a huge emphasis on
    form... and not needing it. I kid, but that is the first thing that came to mind. Some merit to it but I wouldnt be a fan of it myself. To each their own.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    Everyone know's it CrossFit.

    I hope you're not an affiliate. HQ will have a sh*tfit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭Maars


    Stillweak wrote: »
    ....

    The worst

    - A lot of people who should be playing real sport are wasting their talent in crossfit and normal gyms

    No no no...if anything it is the opposite. Those that couldnt make it in organised, competitive sport sometimes end up at Crossfit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,551 ✭✭✭dylbert


    Maars wrote: »
    No no no...if anything it is the opposite. Those that couldnt make it in organised, competitive sport sometimes end up at Crossfit.

    The funny thing is that the fitness, strength and mobility of the average GAA/soccer player is terrible when compared to a crossfit athlete.


  • Registered Users Posts: 91 ✭✭Maars


    dylbert wrote: »
    The funny thing is that the fitness, strength and mobility of the average GAA/soccer player is terrible when compared to a crossfit athlete.

    Thats a fairly massive generalisation there and completely unsubstantiated.

    Here's another one for you. The average crossfitter wouldnt get their name on the teamsheet ahead of the average Gaelic/soccer player.

    The strength/mobility/fitness of a crossfitter is not a yardstick for measuring ability to play organised, competitive sports.


  • Registered Users Posts: 179 ✭✭usersame


    Stillweak wrote: »
    Its got some great points and some bad points.

    Ignore the coach qualifications. Is hes good, hes good. If hes bad hes bad. Wheather it took him a day course or a 3 year degree course to get ''qualified'' is irrelivant.
    The real education doesnt come in a class room or seminar.

    The Good

    - Its good fun
    - gets you fitter and stronger
    - the group mentality does make you work harder
    - for average people they will do things they never thought they could do
    - you will probably make some friends
    - it will lead tou you eating better and drinking less

    The Bad

    - you will talk about crossfit non stop
    - you might turn into a paleo geek
    - you will probably feel you are a professional athlete. Youre not.
    - there is so much cheating in every crossfit gym ( to get better score on white board )
    - injuries are likely

    The worst

    - A lot of people who should be playing real sport are wasting their talent in crossfit and normal gyms

    That's crossfit in a nutshell

    I would add that it's a bit culty


  • Registered Users Posts: 179 ✭✭usersame


    Maars wrote: »
    Thats a fairly massive generalisation there and completely unsubstantiated.

    Here's another one for you. The average crossfitter wouldnt get their name on the teamsheet ahead of the average Gaelic/soccer player.

    The strength/mobility/fitness of a crossfitter is not a yardstick for measuring ability to play organised, competitive sports.

    My crossfitting friend who is crap at rugby is still crap at rugby


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 9,396 ✭✭✭Frosty McSnowballs


    I tried it but my flexibility is so poor so wasn't for me.

    The OH does it, she likes it but I think it's stupidly expensive for what you get.

    The plan she is on allows her three training sessions a week for just under €1000....that's just a 6 month plan. It's double for the year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 168 ✭✭Stillweak


    Maars wrote: »
    No no no...if anything it is the opposite. Those that couldnt make it in organised, competitive sport sometimes end up at Crossfit.
    True but nothing wrong with that. You got to do something.


  • Registered Users Posts: 168 ✭✭Stillweak


    dylbert wrote: »
    The funny thing is that the fitness, strength and mobility of the average GAA/soccer player is terrible when compared to a crossfit athlete.

    Thats a bit unfair. The sports player has the small inconvience of actually having to be good at his sport. Its a lot easier to get strong and mobile when thats all youre doing and you dont have to worry about a match on the weekend.

    You cant max squat and deadlift so much in season. Crossfit has no season.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 36,263 ✭✭✭✭LuckyLloyd


    dylbert wrote: »
    The funny thing is that the fitness, strength and mobility of the average GAA/soccer player is terrible when compared to a crossfit athlete.

    Unfortunately it's comments like that which produce a lot of hate for crossfit and understandably so. There's no doubt that your average junior GAA / Soccer team could do away with touching the toes and running laps. A GAA player who is down the gym doing bicep curls and three variations of dumbell bench is also on the wrong track.

    But even with the confines of a great Crossfit box you can't practice cutting at high speed, sprinting, establishing body position to fend off an opponent etc, etc. And the most important and vital skill of a field sport is the skill of doing that field sport. A guy training in a good crossfit facility (or any good S & C facility) who has applied himself well over a long period will probably move better than the average bear and have good strength and anerobic endurance. But will that translate to moving fluidly on the field of play? Maybe, maybe not.

    Don't forget the mental challenges of playing sport. Crossfit likes to talk a lot of bollocks about 'wod strategy' but all it really comes down to is establishing a consistent workpace and minimising transition times. The mental demands don't come close to the demands placed upon a GAA Half Back.
    Stillweak wrote: »
    Thats a bit unfair. The sports player has the small inconvience of actually having to be good at his sport. Its a lot easier to get strong and mobile when thats all youre doing and you dont have to worry about a match on the weekend.

    You cant max squat and deadlift so much in season. Crossfit has no season.

    And this too of course. You would need intelligent and flexible programming to work around your typical amateur football season that gets going sometime in July, ends sometime in May and has no consistency in fixture scheduling (multi week stretches without a game from November through mid February) and multiple weeks in April and May where there might be four games scheduled. That isn't to say there is a lack of knowledge and effort going into how training feeds into all of that, but it's a hell of a lot easier to provide for a steady and predicatble five training sessions a week and program around that.

    The only quibble with the above is the fact that there is infact a competitive crossfit session starting next week in the form of the open and, even in the case of guys with no shot at regional qualification, ever more competitions popping up in Ireland and the UK. As such, someone doing crossfit as a sport does have to organise their training cycles to peak at certain times of the year. They can't have a pure strength focus all year round in that scenario, etc.

    Any of us doing Crossfit should drop any sense of elitism we hold.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6,818 ✭✭✭Inspector Coptoor


    ^^^^
    Amen to that Lloyd


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,551 ✭✭✭dylbert


    LuckyLloyd wrote: »
    Unfortunately it's comments like that which produce a lot of hate for crossfit and understandably so. There's no doubt that your average junior GAA / Soccer team could do away with touching the toes and running laps. A GAA player who is down the gym doing bicep curls and three variations of dumbell bench is also on the wrong track.

    But even with the confines of a great Crossfit box you can't practice cutting at high speed, sprinting, establishing body position to fend off an opponent etc, etc. And the most important and vital skill of a field sport is the skill of doing that field sport. A guy training in a good crossfit facility (or any good S & C facility) who has applied himself well over a long period will probably move better than the average bear and have good strength and anerobic endurance. But will that translate to moving fluidly on the field of play? Maybe, maybe not.

    Don't forget the mental challenges of playing sport. Crossfit likes to talk a lot of bollocks about 'wod strategy' but all it really comes down to is establishing a consistent workpace and minimising transition times. The mental demands don't come close to the demands placed upon a GAA Half Back.



    And this too of course. You would need intelligent and flexible programming to work around your typical amateur football season that gets going sometime in July, ends sometime in May and has no consistency in fixture scheduling (multi week stretches without a game from November through mid February) and multiple weeks in April and May where there might be four games scheduled. That isn't to say there is a lack of knowledge and effort going into how training feeds into all of that, but it's a hell of a lot easier to provide for a steady and predicatble five training sessions a week and program around that.

    The only quibble with the above is the fact that there is infact a competitive crossfit session starting next week in the form of the open and, even in the case of guys with no shot at regional qualification, ever more competitions popping up in Ireland and the UK. As such, someone doing crossfit as a sport does have to organise their training cycles to peak at certain times of the year. They can't have a pure strength focus all year round in that scenario, etc.

    Any of us doing Crossfit should drop any sense of elitism we hold.

    I wasn't trying to imply that a crossfiter would be better at football than a footballer, I was just commenting on the general fitness levels of the two. Fair enough it wasn't the best thought out comment from me but reading all the crossfit bashing here got my back up.

    The problem is that most peoples knowledge of crossfit starts and ends with a crossfit fail video on YouTube or a bro story they heard about someone's arm falling.off during a wod, but I don't think anything I say on boards will change their mind either way.

    Crossfit's getting bigger and is developing into a sport in its own right. As you say the open starts next week and allot of people have been training hard in preparation, to suggest these people are not real athletes performing in a real sport is a bit small minded.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13 shneakynaggin


    Overpriced and overblown self of importance. The random way "wods" are put together are, along with high rep lifting, is a good way to keep physios in business.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,863 ✭✭✭kevpants


    Sometimes when I'm walking along the street by myself I can't stop myself from laughing and people from looking at me because I remember one time during a WOD involving some of the world's premier Crossfit athletes someone got run over by a Nascar.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13 shneakynaggin


    kevpants wrote: »
    Sometimes when I'm walking along the street by myself I can't stop myself from laughing and people from looking at me because I remember one time during a WOD involving some of the world's premier Crossfit athletes someone got run over by a Nascar.

    Really?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,863 ✭✭✭kevpants


    Really?





    sacbmd6.png

    Sorry it was a cop car not a Nascar.

    When you think about it, that girl never really moved fast enough to pull the car, there was always slack in the rope. So essentially what she did was go for a run then, as punishment for falling behind, got run over.


  • Registered Users Posts: 13 shneakynaggin



    Sorry it was a cop car not a Nascar.

    When you think about it, that girl never really moved fast enough to pull the car, there was always slack in the rope. So essentially what she did was go for a run then, as punishment for falling behind, got run over.

    Its so functional though.


  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 21,981 ✭✭✭✭Hanley


    kevpants wrote: »




    sacbmd6.png

    Sorry it was a cop car not a Nascar.

    When you think about it, that girl never really moved fast enough to pull the car, there was always slack in the rope. So essentially what she did was go for a run then, as punishment for falling behind, got run over.

    You got post of 2011 (?) with Westside explanation, you get 2014 for that.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,551 ✭✭✭dylbert


    Its so functional though.

    Totally functional, ever have a flat battery :p

    Seriously though it was a stupid thing to do and not a bit impressive, I've pushed a car on my own ffs. Tie a prowler to each of them, that would be far more effective.


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