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Tidal Barriers and Flood Defences

  • 05-02-2014 2:56pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 997 ✭✭✭ Colm R


    Given the weather lately, I heard a discussion on Morning Ireland this morning about the possibility of tidal barriers in Cork Harbour.

    In the same discussion, they mentioned that these type of barriers similar to the Thames are not suitable for everywhere.

    Limerick apparently suffers more from fresh water flooding coming down the river, rather than sea water coming up the estuary. This to me sounds like quay wall defences and possibly the building of suirs to carry flood water away quickly are the best solutions.

    Galway and Dublin are effectively built right on the coast, so quay wall defences and possibly huge levees are possibly solutions.

    Any other ideas?

    Turning to Cork, it use to suffer hugely with fresh water flooding, but the two dams, particularly the Inniscara dam have largely put an end to that, with the notable exception of 2009.
    Now however, its biggest threat is the tidal surge, which appears to be less frequent than the days of fresh water flooding, but still a huge threat to the city as seen twice in the past few days. Would a tidal barrier similar to that of the Thames be the best solution for Cork, somewhere down river of the city, perhaps around the location of the Tunnel and Lough Mahon?

    Would a tidal barrier also suit Waterford?

    Just to note, I did not mention money. Just a discussion on what would be the best solution for each of our cities in an ideal scenario.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 534 ✭✭✭ rebs23


    Tidal Barrier is the only way to go for flood defences in Cork. One in Belfast cost £14million in 1994 maybe around €50-100 in todays money. The one in Hull cost £30 Million in the 1990's to construct.

    The time for debate is surely over and its time to start planning and designing it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Hull

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Lagan


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,101 Rightwing


    We don't need any flood defences, the councils will throw out a few sandbags. The Irish solution, oh yeah, and ask Europe for cash too ;)


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,661 ✭✭✭ Markcheese


    Ah sure just build a bit of a barrier between crosshaven and whitegate, just dump a few lorry loads of stone in the channel and stick an aul gate in for good measure.
    It couldn't possibly cost much...

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 534 ✭✭✭ rebs23


    Markcheese wrote: »
    Ah sure just build a bit of a barrier between crosshaven and whitegate, just dump a few lorry loads of stone in the channel and stick an aul gate in for good measure.
    It couldn't possibly cost much...

    No suggestion about building a tidal barrier between crosshaven and whitegate. The OPW report looked at one from Glenbrook to Rushbrooke, a much smaller channel in the Harbour.
    As for costing much look at the links above in relation to similar projects abroad and the cost of them.

    Ah sure lets just leave the place be as it is, sure its grand. We don't need to protect our second city from these events at all. Don't we need a fourth type of rail project in Dublin to spend all our dosh on because we can't have the southsiders seeing the northside as they go to Dublin Airport!:)


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,661 ✭✭✭ Markcheese


    I was only half joking , at least from crosshaven to whitegate (fort maher to fort Davis) would protect the whole harbour area , isn't rushbrook to
    Passage just the main channel ?? Would the other channel cause flooding?? Or would it be enough to stop tidal/wind surge ??
    Would by blackrock be shorter ??

    Either way probably a bit sledge hammer to crack a nut !!

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,102 ✭✭✭ pigtown


    I wonder would returning some of the streets to waterways be a viable solution? Sure it's a radical idea and it would involve major traffic changes but would it solve the problem?


  • Registered Users Posts: 78,233 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Other than Cork City Centre, the Atlantic Pond area and part of Midleton, what valuable areas are actually at risk of tidal flooding?

    The are problems with putting in a barrier. If you put in a cheap one like Belfast, ship can't navigate it. If you want to allow ships, how much are you willing to pay?

    The barrier in Hull if only about 65 metres long, Belfast 125 metres. The Cork equivalents would be the Customs House (you would need two) and the Atlantic Pond.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,661 ✭✭✭ Markcheese


    Maybe I'm way off but the Atlantic pond is near pairc ui caoimh ?
    Why put a barrier along there and another by the city ....
    Guessing a barrier would be to prevent tidal surge

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 78,233 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Markcheese wrote: »
    Maybe I'm way off but the Atlantic pond is near pairc ui caoimh ? Why put a barrier along there and another by the city ....
    One or the other.


  • Registered Users Posts: 270 ✭✭ ncounties


    https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/catastrophic-storm-surge-in-dublin-inevitable-over-coming-decades-1.4071092

    A catastrophic storm during high tide which will leave thousands of homes, businesses and landmark buildings in Dublin under water is inevitable over the coming decades, one of the country’s foremost climate change experts has warned.

    Are we doomed, or is it bluster?


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  • Banned (with Prison Access) Posts: 426 ✭✭ MrAbyss


    one of the country’s foremost climate change experts has warned

    Stopped reading right there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,661 ✭✭✭ Markcheese


    When was the last time that Dublin city had significant coastal flooding?.

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 78,233 ✭✭✭✭ Victor


    Markcheese wrote: »
    When was the last time that Dublin city had significant coastal flooding?.
    The Merrion Gates area, Wolfe Tone Quay, parts of North Strand, Ringsend (the latter two especially when combined with pluvial events) and other areas regularly suffer, while other areas like Clontarf and North Wall are very dependent on coastal protection measures.

    Note that the low air pressure associated with stormy weather allows the sea level to rise. It is combined stormy, high tide, easterly wind moments that create the greatest risks.


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