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Video and Sound Technology

  • 27-01-2014 8:51pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ fiachrag


    Im a LC student and I am thinking about putting down Video and Sound technology, but I'm not sure exactly is covered in the coarse. Is it a hard coarse for someone who is interested in computers and cameras. Hope to hear from someone who has done the coarse. And also what are used in the collage Mac's or PCs


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 7,853 ✭✭✭ frozenfrozen


    Hi bit of a late reply but I'm doing the course at the moment. The modules we're covering at the moment (In first year) are: Intro to computing. Internet and social media. Light and photography. Introduction to Broadcast environment. Electrical & Electric Technology. Intro to Sound Operations.

    I've currently got 24 hours of timetabled classes/labs a week.

    We work on both macs and PCs. The Mac labs are used with Avid's protools, and the pcs in the C block are used for Avid's media composer 5. There are lots of pcs in and around other places for general use. This summer there is a planned upgrade from Media composer 5 to 7, so next year would be a nice year to start with lots of shiny new computers.

    It's incredibly easy if you're interested in computers and cameras. There are currently a few people struggling along in my year, although those are the people who have terrible attendance. There is a huge correlation between those who show up to all of the classes, and those who are scoring highest in the assessments and in the year as a whole.

    The course starts slow, and gives everyone a chance to start at a low level, so if you don't know a lot then don't be afraid you will get left behind. If you're finding any of the modules a little bit tricky and you find yourself falling behind; you can get grinds for free from the learning centre on campus.

    It's by no means a making movies course, which seemingly a few people on the course were surprised by. There's a lot of stuff on the course because of the broad course title. This means we cover things like photography, sound design, simple programming, a little bit of physics (really tiny bit of physics), some work with learning programs like photoshop, protools, media composer, there's a good bit of work learning the microsoft office suite, so if you've done your ECDL that'll be an advantage.

    The workload is next to non-existent. You'll be able to get all of your projects done in the breaks between classes in first year. You'll literally never have to do any work outside of college if you keep up with the work in college. So you'll enjoy not staying up late finishing projects etc..

    The bad sides. If you're already somewhat well read in the subjects covered on the course it's frustratingly slowly moving. The lecturers will be quick to notice this and won't bother you and will let you get on with your own thing. And if you're struggling I'm sure they're very good for helping.

    If you've done technology in LC you'll find the electrical and electric tech module very easy. It's about the same standard that LC tech is.

    If you have any other questions feel free to ask. I'm currently on that course in first year.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ fiachrag


    Thanks a million for the reply. You say "It's by no means a making movies course", but is there much video production in the coarse or is next to nothing?


  • Registered Users Posts: 48 ✭✭✭ Warlock45


    Hey,I'm also interested in starting this course come September.Just have a few questions.Whats the class size like?Is the size as outrageous as it would be in a business course eg 100 or more students??Also in the modules is there a nice bit of video production as that's what I'd be most interested in? Also do you touch on any music software like Fl,Tractor,logic or ableton??Cheers for any feedback you can give!


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,853 ✭✭✭ frozenfrozen


    fiachrag wrote: »
    Thanks a million for the reply. You say "It's by no means a making movies course", but is there much video production in the coarse or is next to nothing?
    Sorry for the late reply I didn't notice it because you didn't quote my message.
    There is theory on video production in first year, and you make a couple of videos, from being taught how to use lights, record good audio, operate the cameras, and edit. Definitely not completely focused on video production, though.
    In second and third year, you do a lot of practical work making videos.
    Warlock45 wrote: »
    Hey,I'm also interested in starting this course come September.Just have a few questions.Whats the class size like?Is the size as outrageous as it would be in a business course eg 100 or more students??Also in the modules is there a nice bit of video production as that's what I'd be most interested in? Also do you touch on any music software like Fl,Tractor,logic or ableton??Cheers for any feedback you can give!

    Class size was very small for me this past year. around 30 got places, 25 showed up, and about 20 have stayed to this point. That number has probably fallen a little lower since we've had the last month off.

    It's due to people either just not liking the course, or else not keeping up with the work. It's really good because you get 1:1 with the lecturers in labs without feeling like you're wasting anyones time. You can also have class discussions, and presentations in front of a small group of people you'll inevitably become good friends with. Everyone got on well in my year just gone by.

    There's a nice bit of video production. There are a few modules: "Intro to sound ops", "Intro to computing", "Intro to broadcast environment"*, "Light and photography", "Electrical & Electric technology", "Internet and social media"

    In the module intro to broadcast environment, you're shown how to operate the cameras they have in college. Shown how to work with avid media composer (The NLE used by most professional editors). This module is also used to explain how funding for projects works, the process of taking a project from an idea to completion, how to light a scene, and some other important things which I can't really recall off the top of my head.

    In introduction to sound ops, you're taught how to use Protools, so that's the sound software you'd be expected to be able to use by the end of the year.


    I'd choose it again if I had the choice out of any college in Ireland. It moves very slowly, so if you're a complete beginner then it's perfect, and if you think you already knew everything like I did, you'll still pick up a lot of stuff on the way, and you're allowed to work at your own pace. They were very accommodating of me being ahead of others at times, and just left the briefs open so you can go as in depth as you want with something. (not to sound up my own arse or anything, I just did everything on this course as a hobby for years while in secondary school)


    The lecturers are all really nice, very easy to talk to, and are genuinely interested in teaching every student. It's not just someone showing up, giving a lecture then going off to have coffee.

    If you've got any more questions just ask, and if I don't reply just send me a PM so I see it in case I forget to check back on this thread.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,503 ✭✭✭ glic83


    What kind of job prospects are you looking at on finishing this course?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 963 Richy06


    You'll be able to get your foot in the door of some places, maybe. But most of the work is in Dublin, so be prepared for that. Also, if you have any desire of getting into editing, chain yourself to the Avids and learn how to edit quickly on it. The course was dire when I started and by 3rd year, we had the facilities needed. So I spent my last two years on the Avids all the time. Now I can edit using only keyboard and very limited mouse use at speeds I could only dream of when I was in college. Of about 10-15 who did the course when I was there, I reckon 2-3 actually got work out of it in the end.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,856 ✭✭✭ FlyingIrishMan


    Bumping this thread. Anyone got any current info on how this course is? Has it changed recently? Still worth doing?


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