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Translation needed!!

Comments

  • #2


    One translation would be "l'amore è paziente, l'amore è gentile". It's a grammatically correct translation, but I'd look a bit further before going for that one as a translation can often be more a transliteration.

    For a start, the phrase sounded familiar and sure enough it appears to be biblical in origin; 1 Corinthians 13:4 to be exact.

    If you take your translation from Italian versions of that passage, you have a selection:
    • "L'amore è paziente, è benigno"
    • "La carità è paziente, è benigna la carità"
    • "L'amore è paziente, è benevolo"
    So, if you're looking to quote that passage, you might consider picking one of those, according to personal taste. Otherwise, you might want to explain what meaning you're attempting to convey, for a better translation.


  • #2


    That is a quote from the bible passage. I don't need it to follow the bible passage exactly, as there are so many different versions and literal translations.
    The first one you said is what I wanted to use "l'amore è paziente, l'amore è gentile"
    I wanted to make sure that was correct!


  • #2


    Also, "L'amore è paziente, è benigno" would literally be translated as love is patient AND kind instead of love is patient, love is kind


  • #2


    Brewlu wrote: »
    Also, "L'amore è paziente, è benigno" would literally be translated as love is patient AND kind instead of love is patient, love is kind
    I'm aware of that. The first translation is in reality a transliteration, which is really just a word for word conversion from one language to another. Often, especially between European languages, this is fine, but other times the original meaning can get lost in translation.

    For example, mi prendi in giro, can be transliterated as you're taking me for a round. Of course, a slightly better translation (i.e. closer to the true meaning) would be you're taking me for a ride or best of all you're taking the piss, which while closest to the original meaning is pretty far away in terms of the words used in the original.

    Point is, a translation and transliteration are not the same thing, and when one translates, often the original words won't 'work' when transliterated. As the line you want translated, is a translation in itself (from biblical Greek), you technically are better off taking an existing translation, that captures what was actually meant, rather than a translation of a translation, where the original meaning may well be lost.

    Nonetheless, if you're happy with the more literal translation, then fair enough, but you may get some raised eyebrows from anyone who's familiar with the Italian version of the passage in the future.

    Still, it's your tattoo! Enjoy!


  • #2


    Hi I appreciate your explanation.
    So:
    L'amore è paziente, è benigno
    Makes more sense? I don't want to look silly if someone who speaks italian were to see the tattoo!
    I like that one of the three you suggested.


  • #2


    It's your call, TBH. If your tattoo is going to be specifically quoting the biblical passage (and even referencing it), then going for one of the 'official' translations may be best. At the end of the day, it's your call, your tattoo and you're going to have to live with it, so go for what you prefer - all I can say is that grammatically they're all correct.


  • #2


    L'amore è paziente, è benigno--- this is from the newest version of the bible, correct? Which translation would be the closest to the original bible phrase?


  • #2


    One more question... Are there masc. fem. versions of words? Would it always be benigno or would it change to begnina?


  • #2


    Brewlu wrote: »
    L'amore è paziente, è benigno--- this is from the newest version of the bible, correct? Which translation would be the closest to the original bible phrase?
    No idea. I'm afraid I'm not a biblical scholar and have no intention of researching which version is closest, so you're on your own at this point.


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