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College in the USA from Ireland? (SAT's VS LC & More)

  • 07-12-2013 5:41pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    Hi All,

    It would be my dream to study Computer Science/ Software engineering in a Californian University, I'm currently in JC.

    I know I have to do my SAT's but how are they in relation to the leaving cert, Should I need to study separately? I was thinking of doing them in Fifth year, So that if I F**k them up I could redo them in Sixth?

    Where do you do them? Anywhere in Dublin? Or Cork?


    Thanks in advance :D


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8 ✭✭✭ sail54


    I think the SAT system is extremely different to the LC; there's 3 sections: Maths, Critical Reading, and Writing (as far as I'm aware). If you're serious about doing it, it'd be worth doing a lot of research into it, as your studies from the LC might not suffice for the SATs.

    Also, be aware of the amount of work you'd be taking on by doing both the LC and the SATs. The LC is enough work on its own; many students find it too much. The danger is that you would put more work and effort into the SATs, and neglect the LC, resulting in lower points. If you fail to get into the college in America then, your points might be too low to even get a course that you want in Ireland.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 6,087 Pro Hoc Vice


    jldesign wrote: »
    Hi All,

    It would be my dream to study Computer Science/ Software engineering in a Californian University, I'm currently in JC.

    I know I have to do my SAT's but how are they in relation to the leaving cert, Should I need to study separately? I was thinking of doing them in Fifth year, So that if I F**k them up I could redo them in Sixth?

    Where do you do them? Anywhere in Dublin? Or Cork?


    Thanks in advance :D

    Go to the university website should be a lot of your answers there. Contact the admissions office, ask for advice and are they aware of any students from ireland who are currently studying there and can they put you in touch. I hope you have a trust fund or can get some kinda scholarship. But budget upto $30,000 a year fees plus accommodation. So fair to budget about $250,000 to cover under grad and post grad.

    http://dublin.usembassy.gov/mobile//ireland/undergrad_study.html

    http://www.qualifax.ie/qf/QFPublic/?Mainsec=events&Subsec=event_details&ID=5162

    http://www.testprepdublin.ie/#!

    Also get info re grants to see if you quilify. Good thing you are thinking about this now better to give yourself time to put everything in order.


  • Registered Users Posts: 744 Darren1o1


    Allot of Universities in the US accept the LC for entry. You should check the admissions office of the Universities you are look at, maybe email them too.
    Look into the cost and the potential for Financial aid. You will need allot of money to study in the US.


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    sail54 wrote: »
    I think the SAT system is extremely different to the LC; there's 3 sections: Maths, Critical Reading, and Writing (as far as I'm aware). If you're serious about doing it, it'd be worth doing a lot of research into it, as your studies from the LC might not suffice for the SATs.

    Also, be aware of the amount of work you'd be taking on by doing both the LC and the SATs. The LC is enough work on its own; many students find it too much. The danger is that you would put more work and effort into the SATs, and neglect the LC, resulting in lower points. If you fail to get into the college in America then, your points might be too low to even get a course that you want in Ireland.

    Thanks very much for the advice, Would you suggest perhaps doing my SAT's after the LC?


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    Darren1o1 wrote: »
    Allot of Universities in the US accept the LC for entry. You should check the admissions office of the Universities you are look at, maybe email them too.
    Look into the cost and the potential for Financial aid. You will need allot of money to study in the US.

    This is exceptionally good advice!! Thank you so much, I am aware of the high cost, But I think it would be an incredible investment.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    Go to the university website should be a lot of your answers there. Contact the admissions office, ask for advice and are they aware of any students from ireland who are currently studying there and can they put you in touch. I hope you have a trust fund or can get some kinda scholarship. But budget upto $30,000 a year fees plus accommodation. So fair to budget about $250,000 to cover under grad and post grad.

    http://dublin.usembassy.gov/mobile//ireland/undergrad_study.html

    http://www.qualifax.ie/qf/QFPublic/?Mainsec=events&Subsec=event_details&ID=5162

    http://www.testprepdublin.ie/#!

    Also get info re grants to see if you quilify. Good thing you are thinking about this now better to give yourself time to put everything in order.[/QUOTE]

    Thank you so much for this reply, This is really insightful and has helped a lot, I'll give it a try and email them,

    I will most defiantly need a grant.


  • Registered Users Posts: 317 ✭✭ hedgehog2


    Do you feel it necessary to put such a huge financial strain on your parents by going this route.
    While it sounds good to study in California,you are very young and a decent university in say Berkley would run you 40-60k per yr in fees alone.
    California has one of the highest costs of living in the United States and finding a summer job or part time work is not as it used to be in the states.
    I am talking from experience here having seen my brother go there on a scholarship and having lived there myself.
    I have lots of American friends with an undergrad qualification and MBA and still weighted down with huge debts in their 30's from college.
    They cannot believe how lucky we have it here,I also know two fellas who graduated in Ireland in computer science and they both started in silocon val 2yrs after graduation with a huge advantage as they could take the lower wage to begin with and not have this debt burden that their colleagues have.
    Get yourself into a good course here by doing well in your LC and start from there.
    You might not even like the course and wish to change after 1yr at least in Ireland this is possible.


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    @hedgehog2

    Thanks for the insightful reply, Which has good points.

    But what I want to study isn't available here in Ireland, We just have a 'generic CS degree' I want to study HIC/UX (Human interaction w/ computers/ User Experience/UI/User Interface Design)

    Perhaps what might be a more applicable route would be to get an engineering degree here in UCC or something? And do a postgrad course in the US?

    Its not just the course you're paying for, Its the culture, California/Silicone Valley has a culture of listening, There are bountiful amounts of students innovating and creating new products every day in Calfironia, In Ireland? What maybe 2?, 3? Young entrepreneurs in the last two years? In Ireland if somebody told you a 15 year old was running a business, You'd snort at the idea of a lemonade stand? But In the US, In California specifically, You can see a 16 year old running a hugely profitable VC funded business.

    See the difference in culture? Ireland in general has a backward way of thinking, Putting experience over creativity which is wrong in todays world.

    Thats my view on the whole thing....


  • Registered Users Posts: 317 ✭✭ hedgehog2


    I see where you are coming from and in many respects I thought along your lines when I was younger.
    I don't want to spoil your dream but you would be a lot better off going the undergrad in ireland and if you got the marks a postgrad in the states.
    Focus on the LC and don't think too far ahead as a lot can change in 3yrs.
    Coming out of college with 300k debt is just not an option unless you have a very wealthy backer.
    those teen tech vp's are in the minority and even coming out with an advanced cs degree from the states won't guarantee you a high paying job these days.
    Good luck with your studies and you can always get to America after you graduate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 850 ✭✭✭ ordinary_girl


    If I remember correctly when they released the details this year of people who achieved the highest points in their LC onr of the students got into Harvard. Honestly, I think you should just focus fully on doing well in your LC - you can still gain access to universities in the US with the LC, without the added strain of trying to ace SATs as well.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    hedgehog2 wrote: »
    I see where you are coming from and in many respects I thought along your lines when I was younger.
    I don't want to spoil your dream but you would be a lot better off going the undergrad in ireland and if you got the marks a postgrad in the states.
    Focus on the LC and don't think too far ahead as a lot can change in 3yrs.
    Coming out of college with 300k debt is just not an option unless you have a very wealthy backer.
    those teen tech vp's are in the minority and even coming out with an advanced cs degree from the states won't guarantee you a high paying job these days.
    Good luck with your studies and you can always get to America after you graduate.

    Thanks for the reply!, This opened up my eyes a bit.


  • Registered Users Posts: 50 ✭✭✭ jldesign


    If I remember correctly when they released the details this year of people who achieved the highest points in their LC onr of the students got into Harvard. Honestly, I think you should just focus fully on doing well in your LC - you can still gain access to universities in the US with the LC, without the added strain of trying to ace SATs as well.

    Thanks for the reply, Interesting.


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,681 Lockstep


    Given the cost, you might be better off doing your degree in Ireland (low fees) or Scotland (free fees). You could always do study abroad and spent a year of your degree in the US (many universities offer this) or do a postgrad afterwards (STEM subjects like Computer science are easier to get funding in)

    Likewise, you could always move there after your degree and work. You'd be at a huge advantage there as you'd have very little debt and could work for cheaper than an American who'd be weighed down with hundreds and thousands of dollars worth of debt.

    I'd definetely say you're better off getting your degree in Europe and then heading over to specialise rather than drowning in American college debt.


  • Registered Users Posts: 744 Darren1o1


    Lockstep wrote: »
    You'd be at a huge advantage there as you'd have very little debt and could work for cheaper than an American who'd be weighed down with hundreds and thousands of dollars worth of debt.

    There are safeguards such as prevailing wage in the US visa system to take care of this.


  • Registered Users Posts: 249 ✭✭ jeonahr


    I'm 4 years late, but was just wondering how everything went?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 4,987 ✭✭✭ JohnMc1


    jldesign wrote: »
    Hi All,

    It would be my dream to study Computer Science/ Software engineering in a Californian University, I'm currently in JC.

    I know I have to do my SAT's but how are they in relation to the leaving cert, Should I need to study separately? I was thinking of doing them in Fifth year, So that if I F**k them up I could redo them in Sixth?

    Where do you do them? Anywhere in Dublin? Or Cork?


    Thanks in advance :D

    Each State and University have their own Admission standards. You should be fine with your Leaving Certs and other School Records. Though if you send them your transcripts of your grades you might want to include a note of what is passing Ireland [or ask someone in your School Dept to do it if you ask them to send your transcripts for you] so they have something to go off of. You can call or email the Admissions office if you're unsure of anything.


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