Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on [email protected] for help. Thanks :)

NI registered ambulance

  • 22-10-2013 10:30pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 69 ✭✭ EIDW


    just a quick question would a northern Ireland ambulance be permitted to use lights and siren on Irish roads EG: i passed an ambulance that was a yellow reg last week on the long mile road but about 15 minuets later the ambulance came flying up the road behind me with light and siren is this legal?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 290 ✭✭ Medic475


    EIDW wrote: »
    just a quick question would a northern Ireland ambulance be permitted to use lights and siren on Irish roads EG: i passed an ambulance that was a yellow reg last week on the long mile road but about 15 minuets later the ambulance came flying up the road behind me with light and siren is this legal?

    Yeah all above board and same other way around!


  • Registered Users Posts: 9,318 ✭✭✭ Mycroft H


    Could be a transfer from a hospital in Belfast to Dublin where one has the facilities and the other doesn't? I certainly wouldn't be bothered.




  • EIDW wrote: »
    just a quick question would a northern Ireland ambulance be permitted to use lights and siren on Irish roads EG: i passed an ambulance that was a yellow reg last week on the long mile road but about 15 minuets later the ambulance came flying up the road behind me with light and siren is this legal?

    Wasn't this one was it?

    normal_propara.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,680 ✭✭✭✭ flazio


    I presume if it didn't have the usual yellow colour the OP would have pointed that out.
    There's a few roads along the border that hop from one side of the border to the other and back again, (N54/A3, N53/A37) so presumably common sense can prevail there and any Fire or Ambulance tender can use their lights and sirens to respond to a callout. Would have my doubts about Gardaí though, especially pursuits.




  • flazio wrote: »
    I presume if it didn't have the usual yellow colour the OP would have pointed that out.
    There's a few roads along the border that hop from one side of the border to the other and back again, (N54/A3, N53/A37) so presumably common sense can prevail there and any Fire or Ambulance tender can use their lights and sirens to respond to a callout. Would have my doubts about Gardaí though, especially pursuits.

    Maybe not. There are still a couple of white NAS ambulances in use. Even one in the Eastern Region Ambulance Service markings.

    And the Long Mile Road is a long way from the border.

    Finally, AGS not allow cross the border.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 69 ✭✭ EIDW


    it was a yellow Mercedes-Benz Sprinter ambulance with green and yellow hi viz markings the reg was REZ-52**


  • Registered Users Posts: 274 ✭✭ da_hambo


    Maybe not. There are still a couple of white NAS ambulances in use. Even one in the Eastern Region Ambulance Service markings.

    And the Long Mile Road is a long way from the border.

    Finally, AGS not allow cross the border.

    An unmarked Garda car is used to cross sections of the border that run through N.I. Thought this was interesting...

    http://www.thejournal.ie/monaghan-villagers-left-beyond-the-law-by-garda-cutbacks-284513-Nov2011/




  • da_hambo wrote: »
    An unmarked Garda car is used to cross sections of the border that run through N.I. Thought this was interesting...

    http://www.thejournal.ie/monaghan-villagers-left-beyond-the-law-by-garda-cutbacks-284513-Nov2011/

    I should have said in normal course. Same applies to PSNI.

    From that article,

    The area was already particularly vulnerable because of its proximity to the Northern Ireland border – beyond which Gardaí cannot travel unless ordered to do so by the Garda Commissioner, and permitted by the PSNI.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,772 ✭✭✭ meathstevie


    The main issue with Gardai or PSNI crossing into eachother's jurisdiction is that they default to ordinary civilians and as a consequence revert to civilians in possession of either prohibited weapons, offensive weapons or unlicenced firearms.

    Arrangements can be made to facilitate entry into eachother's jurisdiction but that's not for discussion in public.

    Cross border activity by either the NHS or the HSE and border area fire services is not that uncommon at all.

    An HSE paramedic in Lifford for example will not let a casualty suffer in the road because he's 3 feet the Strabane side of the border or the other way around for an NHS paramedic.


  • Registered Users Posts: 19 GAVINCC


    There is 1 if not more english reg ambulances hired in from England and being used by Southern Irish Private companies. Could of been one of them


  • Advertisement
Advertisement