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Becoming an RAF Pilot

  • 14-10-2013 5:46pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 313 ✭✭TheBoss11


    Anyone know of any irish citizens that are/where RAF Pilots? Looking into applying next year and I'm just wondering if iv much of a chance. My grandfather served in the RAF but he was only a cook. Also does anyone know how hard it is to actually get into it? Iv heard its intense but I'm just wondering from someone with experience applying in previous years. Thanks for your time



    (Sorry if this is in the wrong forum I couldn't find a suitable one from the mobile website)


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 5,288 ✭✭✭pow wow


    Thread moved to Aviation & Aircraft as it's more relevant to your question.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,979 ✭✭✭Stovepipe


    You will no longer be accepted as a candidate for RAF pilot training, as a citizen of the Republic. If you have or are entitled to hold a UK passport, you're in with a shot. You can find more out on the RAF/MoD sites concerned with recruitment and you should email them for information.

    regards
    Stovepipe


  • Registered Users Posts: 7,558 ✭✭✭andy_g


    Moved to Military.


  • Registered Users Posts: 313 ✭✭TheBoss11


    Stovepipe wrote: »
    You will no longer be accepted as a candidate for RAF pilot training, as a citizen of the Republic. If you have or are entitled to hold a UK passport, you're in with a shot. You can find more out on the RAF/MoD sites concerned with recruitment and you should email them for information.

    regards
    Stovepipe


    My mother was born in London but raised in Ireland so I think I could still qualify?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭tac foley


    Firstly - is/was your mother a citizen of the UK & NI?

    Secondly - where were YOU born? In UK?

    Thirdly - have you ever applied for a UK passport? Or, do you actually posess a UK passport.

    Fourthly - have you lived in the UK for the last five years?

    And lastly, if all the above are 'yes' and you actually HAVE your UK passport, are you qualified academically?

    The best plan is to read the MoD/RAF website, and then call up the office in Belfast for an interview before getting your hopes up. Last year the RAF sh*t-canned an entire year's cadets halfway through training at Cranwell, so even if you are a round peg in a round hole the chances for a while are very slim indeed - and that is for 'proven nationals'.

    Good luck, whatever.

    tac

    PS - Citizens of the Free State joining the RAF during WW2 served with distinction, some, like Paddy Finucane, were outstanding in every respect. There were many more like him in all areas of military aviation - from Coastal Command to Bomber Command and Transport, too. However, during my time with the RAF - I was Army, but my speciality meant that I worked a lot with the RAF - I never saw a contemporary Irish pilot who was not from the North.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 313 ✭✭TheBoss11


    tac foley wrote: »
    Firstly - is/was your mother a citizen of the UK & NI?

    Secondly - where were YOU born? In UK?

    Thirdly - have you ever applied for a UK passport? Or, do you actually posess a UK passport.

    Fourthly - have you lived in the UK for the last five years?

    And lastly, if all the above are 'yes' and you actually HAVE your UK passport, are you qualified academically?

    The best plan is to read the MoD/RAF website, and then call up the office in Belfast for an interview before getting your hopes up. Last year the RAF sh*t-canned an entire year's cadets halfway through training at Cranwell, so even if you are a round peg in a round hole the chances for a while are very slim indeed - and that is for 'proven nationals'.

    Good luck, whatever.

    tac

    PS - Citizens of the Free State joining the RAF during WW2 served with distinction, some, like Paddy Finucane, were outstanding in every respect. There were many more like him in all areas of military aviation - from Coastal Command to Bomber Command and Transport, too. However, during my time with the RAF - I was Army, but my speciality meant that I worked a lot with the RAF - I never saw a contemporary Irish pilot who was not from the North.


    No my mother was not a citizen of the UK, at lest I don't think.

    The answer to the rest in no, il be sitting my leaving cert in June so the academic side hasn't been done but it looks dead handy. Should be able to get the academic requirements.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭tac foley


    TheBoss11 wrote: »
    No my mother was not a citizen of the UK, at lest I don't think.

    The answer to the rest in no, il be sitting my leaving cert in June so the academic side hasn't been done but it looks dead handy. Should be able to get the academic requirements.


    Sir, you are dead in the water. Only UK citizens are selected for pilot training in the RAF. Sorry to rain on your parade.

    Please don't take my word for it, but go check on the nationality requirements on the MoD RAF website.

    Best of luck, whatever else it is that you want to do, but being a pilot in the RAF is not one of them.

    tac


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,798 ✭✭✭Local-womanizer


    What are the nationality requirements for the Army Air Corp?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭tac foley


    You don't join as a pilot, BTW, if you are an OR.

    Officer: The AAC offers an eight year Short Service Commission to a number of officer cadets, post commissioning from the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS), each year. Ideally aircrew aptitude tests, aircrew medicals, and the Flying Grading Course should be completed before entering RMAS. If this is not possible officer cadets may be able to complete aircrew selection and medicals during their time at the Academy. Suitable candidates are interviewed by a Regimental Selection Board in week 26 of the course and successful applicants are commissioned into the AAC on their graduation.
    Officer Assignment from another Regiment or Corps: There is also the opportunity for officers from any regiment or corps to volunteer for a tour with the AAC. You must have completed two years of commissioned service and be on the Army Pilot Course by the age of 30. Officers may apply for a transfer into the AAC during their flying tour. Those officers who do not wish to apply or are not accepted for transfer will return to their parent unit or corps.

    Non-Commissioned Officer: Any soldier with the minimum rank of Lance Corporal, recommended and qualified for promotion to Corporal, with at least four years service, may apply for the Army Pilot Course. Selection procedures are the same as those for officers. Soldiers not already holding the rank of Acting Sergeant will be promoted to this rank and re-badge AAC on the award of their Army Flying Wings, following Conversion to Type training.

    Officer - which has got you over a barrel anyhow due to your lack of British/UK nationality -

    The Army Air Corps may be a flying corps however its officers still require essential qualities, as in any other branch of the British Army.
    These essential qualities are:

    Selfless Commitment
    Courage
    Discipline
    Integrity
    Loyalty
    Respect for others
    A sense of responsibility
    Leadership
    Mental agility
    An additional characteristic necessary within the AAC is a willingness to learn, along with an eagerness to put skills and training into practice.

    To be an officer in the Corps you can join either as a Pilot Officer or an Aviation Support Officer. First and foremost we are looking for good officers that can either be trained to be a competent pilot and become one of our Pilot Officers, or trained to command Ground Support Flights as an Aviation Support Officer. Therefore your first priority is to gain a place on the Commissioning Course at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS).
    Before entering RMAS, potential Pilot Officer candidates will be sent to RAF Cranwell to sit aircrew aptitude tests and have an aircrew medical. If successful, you will be invited to a 48 hour familiarisation visit where you will be briefed about the Corps, take a look at its equipment and may even go on a flight. You will also have a chance to meet some of our young officers before discussing your options and the way ahead with our Recruit Liaison Officer. Those interested in the Aviation Support Officer role will be selected for a visit to Middle Wallop before RMAS.

    The Commissioning Course at RMAS will teach you about being an Officer in the British Army and consists of a number of different elements. During the demanding 44-week course, you will be taught leadership in challenging situations, strategic analysis and battlefield discipline, the value of military doctrine, personnel administration/management and personal organisation.

    tac


  • Registered Users Posts: 313 ✭✭TheBoss11


    tac foley wrote: »
    You don't join as a pilot, BTW, if you are an OR.

    Officer: The AAC offers an eight year Short Service Commission to a number of officer cadets, post commissioning from the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS), each year. Ideally aircrew aptitude tests, aircrew medicals, and the Flying Grading Course should be completed before entering RMAS. If this is not possible officer cadets may be able to complete aircrew selection and medicals during their time at the Academy. Suitable candidates are interviewed by a Regimental Selection Board in week 26 of the course and successful applicants are commissioned into the AAC on their graduation.
    Officer Assignment from another Regiment or Corps: There is also the opportunity for officers from any regiment or corps to volunteer for a tour with the AAC. You must have completed two years of commissioned service and be on the Army Pilot Course by the age of 30. Officers may apply for a transfer into the AAC during their flying tour. Those officers who do not wish to apply or are not accepted for transfer will return to their parent unit or corps.

    Non-Commissioned Officer: Any soldier with the minimum rank of Lance Corporal, recommended and qualified for promotion to Corporal, with at least four years service, may apply for the Army Pilot Course. Selection procedures are the same as those for officers. Soldiers not already holding the rank of Acting Sergeant will be promoted to this rank and re-badge AAC on the award of their Army Flying Wings, following Conversion to Type training.

    Officer - which has got you over a barrel anyhow due to your lack of British/UK nationality -

    The Army Air Corps may be a flying corps however its officers still require essential qualities, as in any other branch of the British Army.
    These essential qualities are:

    Selfless Commitment
    Courage
    Discipline
    Integrity
    Loyalty
    Respect for others
    A sense of responsibility
    Leadership
    Mental agility
    An additional characteristic necessary within the AAC is a willingness to learn, along with an eagerness to put skills and training into practice.

    To be an officer in the Corps you can join either as a Pilot Officer or an Aviation Support Officer. First and foremost we are looking for good officers that can either be trained to be a competent pilot and become one of our Pilot Officers, or trained to command Ground Support Flights as an Aviation Support Officer. Therefore your first priority is to gain a place on the Commissioning Course at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS).
    Before entering RMAS, potential Pilot Officer candidates will be sent to RAF Cranwell to sit aircrew aptitude tests and have an aircrew medical. If successful, you will be invited to a 48 hour familiarisation visit where you will be briefed about the Corps, take a look at its equipment and may even go on a flight. You will also have a chance to meet some of our young officers before discussing your options and the way ahead with our Recruit Liaison Officer. Those interested in the Aviation Support Officer role will be selected for a visit to Middle Wallop before RMAS.

    The Commissioning Course at RMAS will teach you about being an Officer in the British Army and consists of a number of different elements. During the demanding 44-week course, you will be taught leadership in challenging situations, strategic analysis and battlefield discipline, the value of military doctrine, personnel administration/management and personal organisation.

    tac


    Really appreciate all of the information you have provided me with, really a shame now to know that I cannot join the RAF but I will definitly try join the Irish Air Corps.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭tac foley


    TheBoss11 wrote: »
    Really appreciate all of the information you have provided me with, really a shame now to know that I cannot join the RAF but I will definitly try join the Irish Air Corps.

    Best of luck there, Sir.

    tac


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,359 ✭✭✭ Eduardo Tight Heat


    Tac, I asked you about citizenship before but don't think I asked about residency.
    I have UK citizenship, although I've never actually had the passport I know I can get it.
    However I've been living outside the UK for the last 8 years as I was moved to Ireland by the parents.

    Any idea how likely it is the RAF/RNavy would waive their residency requirements, specifically for Pilot/WSOP?


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭tac foley


    Any idea how likely it is the RAF/RNavy would waive their residency requirements, specifically for Pilot/WSOP?

    AFAIK, the terms and conditions are not a bargaining agenda, that's why they are called the Nationality Rules.

    You don't have a UK passport even, to back up your claim. The case for refusing you would also be even stronger, IMO, because of the very nature of the employment that you are looking for. Officers in the British Armed Forces must be proven, passport holding, living-in-the-country UK subjects.

    Remember too, that the competition in fully-qualified people is fearsome, to say the least, much as it is in the PDF and its occasional cadetship 'offers'.

    My advice is to call the recruiting office and see what they have to say on the matter.

    tac


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,504 ✭✭✭tac foley


    One frequent poster here has asked me in a PM [hence no name] about joining the Intelligence Corps TA. The person concerned has dual nationality - Irish/UK Scottish.

    To set that person's mind at rest, and anybody else who might have aspirations in the same direction, here are the UK Government's rules dealing with applicants for this particualr part of the British Territorial Army - please read through. I do not accept any blame for any of this - I don't make the rules, I just abide by them, so flaming me will elicit no further response on this subject. Klar?

    Officers - 17 Years 6 months to 34 Years Old (on entry to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst)

    Soldiers - 17 Years 6 months to 43 Year Old (Ex-regulars may be considered over the age of 43 Years Old on a case by case basis). All applicants MUST be sole UK citizens (no dual nationals) and must have been resident within the UK for a minimum of 10 years.

    Both parents of ALL applicants MUST be UK citizens and have been resident within the UK for a minimum of 10 years. (It should be noted that all applicants are dealt with on a case by case basis. If there are any questions with regards to a candidate's eligibility please call the recruiting team).

    tac


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,195 ✭✭✭goldie fish


    Worth mentioning that with regard to Parents being UK citizens, anyone born in Ireland before 1948 is entitled to hold UK citizenship.


  • Registered Users Posts: 14,148 ✭✭✭✭Lemming


    Worth mentioning that with regard to Parents being UK citizens, anyone born in Ireland before 1948 is entitled to hold UK citizenship.

    Even with that - admittedly oft forgotten clause by myself - both parents would still need to satisfy the minimum residency requirements going by what tac has highlighted. And in that I imagine many would fall foul. Certainly would be the case for myself; both parents would satisfy the ability to hold a UK passport with one parent able to invoke the above clause mentioned by yourself goldiefish, but only one parent would be able to claim citizenship upwards of ten years.


  • Registered Users Posts: 327 ✭✭Bebop


    AFAIK there is no (fixed wing)flight training at the moment in the UK services due to cutbacks; the Royal Navy has disposed of all its fixed-wing assets including Harriers and has no plans to replace them until the new carriers come onstream, pilot training might resume in 2016 once they decide what aircraft to buy from the US, The RAF has also cutback, scrapping the Nimrod and starting early retirement of the Tornado, there are only small numbers of Typhoon in service, so there is a surplus of trained aircrew at the moment


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