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Lost what to do on guitar...

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 24 ✭✭✭ MusicLifeMan


    I'm going into my second year of guitar, I'm in 2 bands (one of them I play bass for and the other guitar) I want to be a professional musician and write my own stuff, but even though i have a lot to learn, I'm stuck what to do. I will be getting lessons again in September.

    I know its a difficult question to ask but any help at all will be greatly appreciated. xD


Comments



  • I think it helps to write out a practice schedule. There's loads of different ways of doing this.

    You always want to keep on top of the basics. So scales, arpeggios and chords.
    Some other fundamentals would be ear training, trying to figure out songs by ear.

    Keep practicing the tunes you need to know for the bands.

    Work on learning tunes that you really love and inspire you, whether you're playing them in the band or not.

    It all depends how much free time you have.

    You could write out a list:
    15mins scales.
    30mins tunes.
    30mins new tunes.
    15mins ear training.

    And just work through the list and repeat.


    If you want more info or whatever just ask. Hope this helps. Keep at it!




  • 18AD wrote: »
    I think it helps to write out a practice schedule. There's loads of different ways of doing this.

    You always want to keep on top of the basics. So scales, arpeggios and chords.
    Some other fundamentals would be ear training, trying to figure out songs by ear.

    Keep practicing the tunes you need to know for the bands.

    Work on learning tunes that you really love and inspire you, whether you're playing them in the band or not.

    It all depends how much free time you have.

    You could write out a list:
    15mins scales.
    30mins tunes.
    30mins new tunes.
    15mins ear training.

    And just work through the list and repeat.


    If you want more info or whatever just ask. Hope this helps. Keep at it!

    what scales do you think i should do and is ear training difficult? like should i start with simple chord songs?




  • I want to be a professional musician
    I'm stuck what to do


    Seek lessons from a reputable teacher.




  • what scales do you think i should do and is ear training difficult? like should i start with simple chord songs?

    You want to start with the most common scales and practice one octave of them. So major, minor, dorian, mixolydian I would say are very common. Practice playing through one octave of these at different tempos. You'd want to know how to play these without having to think about it. Then you can practice two octaves of the scales and push the tempo up when you're comfortable with them.

    Definitely start with easy things for ear training. You can start with simple melodies and then move on to chords. Singing things is also a great help in developing you ear.

    There're some simple trainers here: http://classic.musictheory.net/
    Andsight reading here: http://www.practicesightreading.com/




  • You're at the early stages of learning an instrument so there are loads of things you can set off and learn.

    First and foremost, get your rhythm playing down and become really comfortable with playing in time, use a drum machine or metronome for this. A lot of players can play amazing lead parts in time but can't play a rhythm part in time because they never practiced that stuff, get good at it at this early stage and you'll be on the right path. When you have playing in time down, then start playing with accents in your strumming patterns and the different feels you can get by doing this.

    As far as scales go I'd work in a bit of theory with this. I would take the major scale, for beginners on guitar I prefer to teach this in G. Work through the scale in the first position, then do some reading and learn how to make chords using the notes of the scale. Then string these together and try and listen to how they sound together, you'll come to recognize patterns that sound good together - try and find out why they work together.

    Lastly, listen to music, if you hear something you like, try and play it. Broaden your horizons, If you're into Metallica try out some Clapton. When listening to music try and come to understand not only the guitar parts but the other instruments too. This is an essential mindset for anybody wanting to be a musician, you could be the most technical guitarist in the world but if you don't know what/when to play you won't get a job.

    All of this stuff should be done in tandem, no need to focus on one then the other, try and integrate the approach to your practicing and you'll be laughing.
    Best of luck with it.


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  • Rigsby wrote: »


    Seek lessons from a reputable teacher.


    I strongly agree with Rigsby. Find a good teacher if you can afford it. The progress I've made in the last year would have been impossible (for me anyway) without a teacher.

    Good luck!!




  • Oink wrote: »
    I strongly agree with Rigsby. Find a good teacher if you can afford it. The progress I've made in the last year would have been impossible (for me anyway) without a teacher.

    Good luck!!

    Now all that's left for you to do is give the OP your teacher's details!


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