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Commerce in UCD

  • 15-06-2013 12:40am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 704 Lara_15


    Hi :)
    I'm starting to research courses as I'm going into 6th year and I'm considering Commerce in UCD, I was just wondering what the course is like etc.
    I'm pretty sure I would be most interested in the Accounting side of the course... and accounting as a career when I'm finished, so I was also wondering if I would be better off doing a pure accounting degree rather than commerce???
    I have been told the Commerce degree is one of the best degrees in ireland if you're looking to go into the business area and that it has an excellent reputation among some of the top firms (the big 4)... is this true??
    Thanks so much :D


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 35 ✭✭✭ Pawblo Pugcasso


    Lara_15 wrote: »
    Hi :)
    I'm starting to research courses as I'm going into 6th year and I'm considering Commerce in UCD, I was just wondering what the course is like etc.
    I'm pretty sure I would be most interested in the Accounting side of the course... and accounting as a career when I'm finished, so I was also wondering if I would be better off doing a pure accounting degree rather than commerce???
    I have been told the Commerce degree is one of the best degrees in ireland if you're looking to go into the business area and that it has an excellent reputation among some of the top firms (the big 4)... is this true??
    Thanks so much :D

    Hi Lara

    I'm a mature student and am just after finishing 1st year Commerce so hope I offer some perspective.

    You can get exemptions from some of the professional accounting exams if you specialize in accounting in third year, and the BComm does have an excellent reputation among employers. Competition for places in the Big 4 is huge though, so you really need to work during your degree.

    There are a lot of presentations and group work....and I mean a lot. You'll pretty much be working solidly from the first two weeks of term if you want decent marks. It's good in that there is a huge emphasis on continuous assessment which means there is somewhat less pressure around exam time.

    The facilities in the Quinn school are top class too, it really does have an effect on your study.


  • Registered Users Posts: 704 Lara_15


    Thanks so much :) that helps alot
    I don't mind group work, but I hate english and I'm not a big fan of essays at all, is there many essays in the course??
    thanks again


  • Registered Users Posts: 35 ✭✭✭ Pawblo Pugcasso


    Lara_15 wrote: »
    Thanks so much :) that helps alot
    I don't mind group work, but I hate english and I'm not a big fan of essays at all, is there many essays in the course??
    thanks again

    There is a module in first Semester called foundations of Management thought which is assessed by 3 essays. I think the whole idea is to teach critical thinking skills which can be used throughout the degree. Don't let it put you off though, there will be some modules you'll like and others you won't just like any degree. My favourite was Business Live, where you run a virtual business for a semester :D

    Tutorial sizes are small and you'll be in the same tutorial groups for most tutorials so you get to know people.


  • Registered Users Posts: 11,191 ✭✭✭✭ AdamD


    Foundations was awful stuff altogether


  • Registered Users Posts: 35 ✭✭✭ Pawblo Pugcasso


    AdamD wrote: »
    Foundations was awful stuff altogether

    It was pretty boring alright


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  • Registered Users Posts: 125 ✭✭ Smash The House


    Sorry to bump the thread but didn't think it'd be worth starting a new one.

    I'm also a LC 2014 student, Commerce in UCD will mostly be no.1 on the CAO for me.
    I studied Business Studies at JC and didn't like the accounting as it was too boring; add this, subtract that, balance this etc. However, i enjoyed the accounting aspects that involved analysing. I am only doing Economics for LC and enjoy it too.

    Is Accounting bearable in Commerce?
    From looking at what's involved in Financial Accounting from the cirriculum for the most part it's more about interpreting the accounts, analysing it and commenting/reporting/describing what problems and solutions there are. Would i be right?


  • Registered Users Posts: 413 ✭✭ Seans_Username


    Is Accounting bearable in Commerce?
    From looking at what's involved in Financial Accounting from the cirriculum for the most part it's more about interpreting the accounts, analysing it and commenting/reporting/describing what problems and solutions there are. Would i be right?

    From my experience: no. It's mainly about getting the numbers right.

    I despised accounting. Absolutely despised it. I never got anything higher than a D in it. It was the first time I did accounting and they said they would treat everyone as if they never did accounting before. Which I thought was BS. Certain tutors are very good at teaching it to beginners, others treated us like junior KPMG workers who need to know the most precise details, rather than the basics.

    The only way I got through it was by learning how to do the accounts themselves. I don't know anyone who had bother with it when they did accounting for the leaving. They thought it was piss easy

    But that's from my non-accounting LC viewpoint. I thought Financial Accounting 2 was much more understandable than FA1. To me, FA1 focused on very little specific details, whereas FA2 focused more on the bare bones of doing the accounts.


  • Registered Users Posts: 125 ✭✭ Smash The House


    From my experience: no. It's mainly about getting the numbers right.

    I despised accounting. Absolutely despised it. I never got anything higher than a D in it. It was the first time I did accounting and they said they would treat everyone as if they never did accounting before. Which I thought was BS. Certain tutors are very good at teaching it to beginners, others treated us like junior KPMG workers who need to know the most precise details, rather than the basics.

    The only way I got through it was by learning how to do the accounts themselves. I don't know anyone who had bother with it when they did accounting for the leaving. They thought it was piss easy

    That's what i was afraid of :/
    Thanks for the reply.
    I think I'll definitely have to find out how much I can't stand accounts asap; I know it's somewhere between annoying but bearable and never wanting to look an account :p
    I've never even looked at LC accounting stuff so I'd be best to start there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 148 ✭✭ Kiltennel


    Sorry to bump the thread but didn't think it'd be worth starting a new one.

    I'm also a LC 2014 student, Commerce in UCD will mostly be no.1 on the CAO for me.
    I studied Business Studies at JC and didn't like the accounting as it was too boring; add this, subtract that, balance this etc. However, i enjoyed the accounting aspects that involved analysing. I am only doing Economics for LC and enjoy it too.

    Is Accounting bearable in Commerce?
    From looking at what's involved in Financial Accounting from the cirriculum for the most part it's more about interpreting the accounts, analysing it and commenting/reporting/describing what problems and solutions there are. Would i be right?

    You'll have to do Financial Accounting 1 and Financial Accounting 2. These are the only core Financial Accounting modules, you may do Financial Accounting 3 at your own discretion if you wish to pursue accountancy as a career. You'll also have to Management Accounting but his is very different and I found it much more enjoyable than Financial Accounting. It allowed more creative thought than Financial Accounting does.

    It is certainly possible to do well in Accountancy modules without having done Accounting for the LC. If you like modules where you learn processes off by heart instead of writing essays / interpreting accounts then you should be able to do well in it no problem. If you wish to pursue Accountancy as a career then you can specialise in it in final year getting all your Cap1 exemptions (1 of 3 series of exams to fully qualify). If in the preceeding 2 years you decide you don't want to pursue accountancy then you have the option to specialise in Economics, Finance, HR, Management, Management Information Systems, Marketing or any mix of the above. For that I'd recommend the course, you'll never end up too bogged down in one area.


  • Registered Users Posts: 704 Lara_15


    Coming from someone who is doing accounting for the lc, its much much more interesting and varied than junior cert accounts. I didn't love accounting for junior cert, I wasn't even going to pick accounting as a subject, but my teacher persuaded me and now its my favourite subject and I want to be an accountant. By the sounds of it you would much prefer management accounting than financial accounting, its more about analysing things rather than putting figures in columns and it doesn't have a set format. I don't think looking at leaving cert questions will really be of any help to you, they will just confuse you because you most likely won't understand them.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 704 Lara_15


    oh! and anybody else reading this and wondering about the big 4...
    I talked to a HR person in PwC and they prefer either BComm from UCD or accounting and finance from DCU :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 125 ✭✭ Smash The House


    Kiltennel wrote: »
    You'll have to do Financial Accounting 1 and Financial Accounting 2. These are the only core Financial Accounting modules, you may do Financial Accounting 3 at your own discretion if you wish to pursue
    It is certainly possible to do well in Accountancy modules without having done Accounting for the LC. If you like modules where you learn processes off by heart instead of writing essays / interpreting accounts then you should be able to do well in it no problem. If you wish to pursue Accountancy as a career then you can specialise in it in final year getting all your Cap1 exemptions (1 of 3 series of exams to fully qualify). If in the preceeding 2 years you decide you don't want to pursue accountancy then you have the option to specialise in Economics, Finance, HR, Management, Management Information Systems, Marketing or any mix of the above. For that I'd recommend the course, you'll never end up too bogged down in one area.

    Thanks for that.
    The last few points are really what is making BComm stand out for me; I know I wouldn't do anything other than something Business related for my life; just not sure what :p
    Lara_15 wrote: »
    Coming from someone who is doing accounting for the lc, its much much more interesting and varied than junior cert accounts. I didn't love accounting for junior cert, I wasn't even going to pick accounting as a subject, but my teacher persuaded me and now its my favourite subject and I want to be an accountant. By the sounds of it you would much prefer management accounting than financial accounting, its more about analysing things rather than putting figures in columns and it doesn't have a set format. I don't think looking at leaving cert questions will really be of any help to you, they will just confuse you because you most likely won't understand them.

    That pretty much sums it up :D
    I wouldn't mind too much if it complimented other parts of the course an gave me a better overall knowledge of what I'd be studying (which I'm presuming it does). Whereas in school, it's more about learning it because it's your subject an that's that.
    Lara_15 wrote: »
    oh! and anybody else reading this and wondering about the big 4...
    I talked to a HR person in PwC and they prefer either BComm from UCD or accounting and finance from DCU :)

    Another reason to choose UCD. I know I've heard that most employer's will not care about where you did your degree but the reality is that big firms here and especially abroad are going to give preference to colleges that have a good reputation and that produce good graduates (or that attract good graduates). NUIG is the only other college offering Commerce (not "Business") as 3 year course and I wouldn't touch Galway with a barge pole; just don't like the city or the college. I love UCD on the other hand; after being in it twice. Business school is class from my impressions also. At the moment I wouldn't choose anywhere else tbh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 148 ✭✭ Kiltennel



    Another reason to choose UCD. I know I've heard that most employer's will not care about where you did your degree but the reality is that big firms here and especially abroad are going to give preference to colleges that have a good reputation and that produce good graduates (or that attract good graduates). NUIG is the only other college offering Commerce (not "Business") as 3 year course and I wouldn't touch Galway with a barge pole; just don't like the city or the college. I love UCD on the other hand; after being in it twice. Business school is class from my impressions also. At the moment I wouldn't choose anywhere else tbh.

    Most places will claim where you do your degree makes little difference (publicly declaring preference for certain colleges is bad press) but the reality is if you want to do a business course UCD Commerce or BESS in Trinity will open up more doors than their equivalents in the other colleges. BESS only offers 2 out of the 5 Cap1 exemptions so if you're considering Accounting at all then Commerce takes it in that regard. If you don't want to go near Accounting as a career then they're both on an equal footing here, Trinity has the name abroad. Handy thing about UCD Commerce is the alumni network, there's Commerce alumni in just about every major accounting firm, bank and Fortune 500 company in Ireland and the UK, plenty worldwide too.
    That pretty much sums it up :D
    I wouldn't mind too much if it complimented other parts of the course an gave me a better overall knowledge of what I'd be studying (which I'm presuming it does). Whereas in school, it's more about learning it because it's your subject an that's that.

    No matter what career you pursue, if it's in business at some point you'll need to be able to read and interpret financial statements. Financial Accounting 1 & 2 will give you a sufficient understanding of the 3 major financial statements and the relevant accounting standards. Basic financial literacy is very important, these 2 modules will provide an adequate level of it for a graduate.


  • Registered Users Posts: 35 ✭✭✭ Pawblo Pugcasso


    Sorry to bump the thread but didn't think it'd be worth starting a new one.

    I'm also a LC 2014 student, Commerce in UCD will mostly be no.1 on the CAO for me.
    I studied Business Studies at JC and didn't like the accounting as it was too boring; add this, subtract that, balance this etc. However, i enjoyed the accounting aspects that involved analysing. I am only doing Economics for LC and enjoy it too.

    Is Accounting bearable in Commerce?
    From looking at what's involved in Financial Accounting from the cirriculum for the most part it's more about interpreting the accounts, analysing it and commenting/reporting/describing what problems and solutions there are. Would i be right?

    I'd never done accounting before and managed to get a B in the end. For Financial Accounting 1 they don't provide the templates in the final exam anymore which is tougher since you have to memorize these as well as work out the figures.

    As others have said I found the pace really quick during the tutorials and had to work hard to keep up.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 garydaly01


    what do people think point will be for this course in 2014. i dont think they will increase much more.


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