Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

Interview Experiences and How Tos

Options
  • 13-02-2013 11:38am
    #1
    Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 19,240 Mod ✭✭✭✭


    Haven't seen a similar thread, but if one exists, I'd be happy to see this one merged or the original brought up. My idea is to help out by sharing experiences of interviews, what worked and what didn't. Hopefully recruiters could throw in their thoughts to help out job seekers also.

    I haven't been interviewed formally for my current position. It resulted in a technical interview over email and phone. Then I received a phone call to show up for work as soon as I could. Sadly this is an absolute rearity for 99.99% of people out there.

    In previous successful interviews, I found that if I dressed smart, understood what I was talking about and sought jobs I felt suitable for, it improved my chances greatly. I also found that displaying confidence (not arrogance) even if slightly false, it also helped. With that, if interviewers picked on points within my CV, I was able to provide creative answers, but never lied or over inflated my abilities. I essentially made myself an attractive candidate. By doing the above, I was able to land a job which wasn't advertised, I didn't apply for, but paid better and I enjoyed a hell of alot more that most jobs I've had on one occasion.

    I remember one job last year, the interviewer who would go on to be my general manager, told me straight out, he never interviewed anyone before. In one line, I had a confidence boost and new I could leverage the situation to my advantage. Queue new job that paid 2000 more than what I expected. Sadly their finances couldn't stretch to keep me on as they had lost some contracts, but the experience was invaluable and here I am, in a job that pays me 15,000 more per year.

    Anyone else have tips or interview experiences, both good and bad we could all learn from?


Comments

  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 51,461 Mod ✭✭✭✭Necro


    I'm actually currently unemployed. I returned from Australia in August after 14 months away from Ireland. I've had almost ten interviews in that time, and I have had good, and also terrible experience from them.

    First, I'll start with the bad. I undertook an interview for a local supermarket, where I turned up for a supervisor's position - something I have done for quite a few years in the past. Upon arrival, said owner told me that my experience was not valid, because A) he didn't like an ex-employer of mine, and B) because the supermarket was too small. He then proceeded to lambast my CV until a manager turned up 5 minutes late to the meeting, and started asking about experience from the job the owner had already discredited. The owner continued to berate my former employer for his political views. I had finally reached the end of my tether, and politely stood up and made myself scarce.

    Another terrible experience of mine came when I was applying for a hotel position in a family run place on the outskirts of Galway. I arrived ten minutes early for the interview, and was handed a questionnaire to fill out. I had a sneaking suspicion of how this was going to go down almost immediately when I noticed one of the questions - 'Is your boss always right?' I honestly was taken aback and unsure how to answer this. I thought honesty was the best policy, and stated - 'It would depend on the circumstances." I filled the rest of the questionnaire in and waited... for another 30 mins before the owner sauntered in, all red-faced and puffy. As stood up to shake his hand as he entered the room, and he promptly snatched the questionnaire from my hand and dumped himself down across from me.
    He then asked who I was, and what position I applied for....having no copy of my CV to hand himself. He casually flicked through the questionnaire, and I knew what was coming - he took offense to my answering of the question mentioned earlier. He asked me to elaborate, and I proceded to - of which I won't go into detail here. As I answered a series of questions, his phone began to ring - and he stopped me mid-sentence and answered the phone...at which point I once again excused myself and headed back home, dejected and angry for having wasted a day.

    Interviews in which I seem to have done well followed typical procedure - but my major problem is lack of feedback. Only two of the interviews in which I have partaken have followed up to inform me I was unsuccessful. Am I being hyper-sensitive in feeling this incredibly rude? I would like to get other people's views on this.

    BTW, I do feel that I could brush up on my interview skills - I haven't had to have a face-to-face interview before I came back to Ireland in about 5 years, maybe longer. But practice makes perfect,right???


  • Moderators, Computer Games Moderators, Technology & Internet Moderators Posts: 19,240 Mod ✭✭✭✭L.Jenkins


    All you can do is practice. Each interview will have both good and bad point. Regarding feedback, I say the best policy is to give them a few days to sort through candidates, then I'd ring them to see if they have reached a decision. It would show them I'm interested in the position instead of just going through the motions and waiting for a response.

    As for your own experiences, I would say bring a copy of your CV in the future and any mail correspondence for yourself to read as a possible reminder. Mail correspondence might provide a refresher or useful tips prior to the interview.

    As for the attitude of each interviewer, I can't say they would be employers I'd like to work for. If they can't show up prepared, on time and set their personal issues aside, then they are wasting everyones time. Courtescy and respect works both ways.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,806 ✭✭✭D1stant


    Necrominus wrote: »


    He then asked who I was, and what position I applied for....having no copy of my CV to hand himself. He casually flicked through the questionnaire, and I knew what was coming - he took offense to my answering of the question mentioned earlier. He asked me to elaborate, and I proceded to - of which I won't go into detail here. As I answered a series of questions, his phone began to ring - and he stopped me mid-sentence and answered the phone...at which point I once again excused myself and headed back home, dejected and angry for having wasted a day.

    Interviews in which I seem to have done well followed typical procedure - but my major problem is lack of feedback. Only two of the interviews in which I have partaken have followed up to inform me I was unsuccessful. Am I being hyper-sensitive in feeling this incredibly rude? I would like to get other people's views on this.

    BTW, I do feel that I could brush up on my interview skills - I haven't had to have a face-to-face interview before I came back to Ireland in about 5 years, maybe longer. But practice makes perfect,right???

    So do I. You should never leave an interview... treat it as an exercise on how to deal with a difficult client or whatever, but leaving is a cardinal sin. You have burned your bridges with the interviewer and maybe many more you will never find out about as you dont know how this person may be connected to other local employers

    I'm not really sure what point the OP is trying to make other than gloat a little

    In general an interview is ike a 1st date - can you do the job? - that should be evident from your CV, can you work together? Is the package ok

    Be proud, be honest, be yourself


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 51,461 Mod ✭✭✭✭Necro


    D1stant wrote: »
    So do I. You should never leave an interview... treat it as an exercise on how to deal with a difficult client or whatever, but leaving is a cardinal sin. You have burned your bridges with the interviewer and maybe many more you will never find out about as you dont know how this person may be connected to other local employers

    I'm not really sure what point the OP is trying to make other than gloat a little

    In general an interview is ike a 1st date - can you do the job? - that should be evident from your CV, can you work together? Is the package ok

    Be proud, be honest, be yourself

    I do agree with you, and it's not something I practice on a regular basis. But to be honest, it was either leave or get into an argument which would be futile. I've had more interviews where I stuck to the end and have had some very positive experiences but I was just sharing some of the bad.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,839 ✭✭✭Cake Man


    Necrominus wrote: »
    Interviews in which I seem to have done well followed typical procedure - but my major problem is lack of feedback. Only two of the interviews in which I have partaken have followed up to inform me I was unsuccessful. Am I being hyper-sensitive in feeling this incredibly rude? I would like to get other people's views on this.

    No, not at all. The gf had an interview there last Monday for an accounts admin job. They said they'd get back to her by the end of the week (last week) and yesterday still no sign of them contacting her. She finally gave them a ring yesterday to find out what the story was and not much surprise when the person who interviewed her said they hired somebody else for the position. When the gf asked if there was any feedback/where she fell down etc., the interviewer just mentioned in a huff "oh no, we just decided to hire someone else". The gf was fairly pissed off that they made no effort to inform her of unsuccessfully not getting the role or even to give any feedback that she could use for future reference but mostly that she said it in a snotty way.
    IMO, it's incredibly rude of a company to not even let someone know if they got a job or not. Or even if you apply for a position and then just never hear anything back.

    On interviews good/bad, I recall an interview a few years back just soon after I graduated from college (engineering). It was only for one of those slave jobs where you work fulltime and get the experience but no pay. At this stage, I obviously had little experience but went in well prepared. Although I didn't have much experience to talk about, I prepared on focusing on subjects done in college, final year project, some work exp I did during college etc.
    I felt the interviewer kind of hauled me over the coals and asked very technical questions that you'd expect if you were an engineer with 5-10yrs experience. Asked me what certain formulas were and other irrelevant things. Basically told me I wasn't prepared for the interview. Was fairly pissed off, especially considering I would be working for nothing so it'd be no loss for him.

    I'd say all other interviews I've done hve been good. Just went in very prepared and had an answer for everything. Made sure I knew my CV off by heart.
    Interview last week I had was tough, absolutely nothing asked on my CV or any of the typical interview questions. They just had a few sheets and asked those behaviour type questions (tell me a time you did this, tell me a time you managed to do this etc etc.). Think I handled it ok though, the more experience you have I think the easier it is to answer these types of questions.


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 75 ✭✭crixos30


    Hi all,
    I'm just wondering can someone shed a bit of light on this,I applied for an at home iOS adviser for apple last week I then received an invitation to complete an online video interview,just lookin to know is there anyone here who did one of these and what sort of questions should I be prepared to be asked(there's 16) ........interviews are not one of my strong points at all.


Advertisement