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Teen sleeping patterns.

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  • 26-11-2012 12:51pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 8,427 ✭✭✭


    So there comes a time in every teens life it seem when they decided to experiment, with their sleeping patterns.

    Anyone else got experience with this?
    Anyone got any tips or ways to help them re correct a screw up sleep pattern?

    My eldest work up at 4am Saturday morning after 5 hours sleep and decided to get up and play xbox as he said he wasn't tired any more. Que him screwing up his body clock completely and being grumpy for the whole weekend and out of sorts and then didn't sleep right last night and went to school like a bear poke out of hibernation.


Comments

  • Administrators, Politics Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 25,947 Admin ✭✭✭✭✭Neyite


    I was terrible for staying up till all hours reading. Then I'd be in bed for half the day. I've slept in for a family communion. At 3pm. (in my twenties :o)

    Most memorably when I was 17 my father decided to see one weekend how much I could sleep so told everyone not to wake me. So I went to bed on Friday night /early hours of Saturday morning and woke up around 9.30 in the morning. 9.30 Sunday morning that is.:D I thought the family were winding me up getting ready for mass (big prankster family) but I doubt they got the priest and the entire parish in on the prank.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,659 ✭✭✭CrazyRabbit


    Explain that the body does most of its growing during sleep, and it is therefore extremely important during teenage years. And of course point out the grumpiness and 'jetlag' feeling that can occur from messing up your sleep pattern.

    If that doesn't work, then take away the xbox, phone, bedroom tv etc so that there is little to do at 5am in the morning. Lack of sleep can affect concentration, school work & your general health. It's important to nip this in the bud IMHO.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,427 ✭✭✭Morag


    If that doesn't work, then take away the xbox, phone, bedroom tv etc so that there is little to do at 5am in the morning. Lack of sleep can affect concentration, school work & your general health. It's important to nip this in the bud IMHO.

    He doesn't have any of that in his room, but if he wakes at 5am he's more then capable of sneaking down stairs and using the pc with headphones so that he doesn't walk me, that's what he did last time. I read the riot act over it.

    I do think it's important esp as this is an exam year. A hoping that being vigilant will help.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,559 ✭✭✭Daisy M


    Sharrow wrote: »
    He doesn't have any of that in his room, but if he wakes at 5am he's more then capable of sneaking down stairs and using the pc with headphones so that he doesn't walk me, that's what he did last time. I read the riot act over it.

    I do think it's important esp as this is an exam year. A hoping that being vigilant will help.

    Well unplug the wifi and take it to your room then all he can do is watch telly which is less tempting. Chances are he would have fallen back to sleep but the lure of the (stupid, annoying worst tihing ever to come into our house) x box was what kept him awake.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,252 ✭✭✭echo beach


    Sharrow wrote: »
    He doesn't have any of that in his room, but if he wakes at 5am he's more then capable of sneaking down stairs and using the pc with headphones so that he doesn't walk me, that's what he did last time. I read the riot act over it.

    I do think it's important esp as this is an exam year. A hoping that being vigilant will help.

    If he is sitting exams he is old enough to know himself that if he stays up all night playing x box or whatever he will be tired the next day.
    Say 'I told you so', and let him learn that his actions have consequences. He has to have the discipline to resist all the distractions that are around him, day and night. There is nothing to be gained by turning this into a battle between you. If he sees this is annoying you he may stay awake just to prove that you can't make him sleep by taking his playthings away.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,831 ✭✭✭Peanut Butter Jelly


    In bed at 11, up at 7 during the week, in bed at 12/1 during the weekends, up at 10/11.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,127 ✭✭✭ZombieBride


    My 15 year old can often be heard still moving around in his room after midnight, he generally goes to his room about 10:30 and he has nothing but books in there but books are his downfall if you can even say that, as he will read and read until there are no pages left, forgetting that he has to be up at 7am.
    It is annoying trying to wake his grumpy head in the morning but I wouldn't fret too much over it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 262 ✭✭tigerblob


    I think this is normal and all teenagers do it. Enforce a bedtime on school nights, but at the weekend you might as well just let him sleep when he wants. I'd say we all did it, and all his friends do it. Just a part of being that age.


  • Site Banned Posts: 14 myparenting101


    Allow him to do other things only when he get enough rest & sleep. Give him milk before sleeping that will help to make his sleeping better.


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