Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie

Walking a puppy

Options
  • 03-10-2012 12:46pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 7,598 ✭✭✭


    Hi,

    I have a 3 month old bichon frise. He has all his jabs so can bring him out for walks however he refuses to walk on the lead. He's fine with his collar on, runs around doesn't mind. As soon as I attach the lead he just sits or lies on the ground and won't move. I've walked away and left him sitting with the lead attached hoping he'd follow me but he just sits. This is happening in the house or back garden he hasn't been outside yet.

    Never had this with my dogs before, any tips.

    Thanks.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 8,000 ✭✭✭andreac


    At 3 months i wouldnt be rushing out for walks just yet. At home, just attach the lead to the collar and let the pup walk around the house with it following behind it. It will get used to seeing the lead and having it attached. Dont make a fuss or make a point of the lead, just let them on and ignore them.

    Gradually then start to put a little pressure on the lead by holding it and coaxing the pup to you with really tasty treats/or a toy so they associate the lead with something nice. Dont force or drag the pup to you, they need to come themselves willingly, just give a light tug and call the pup and make it fun and rewarding.

    Lead training takes time and patience so dont expect too much too soon.


  • Registered Users Posts: 369 ✭✭Papillon!


    My puppy is four months and walking fine on the lead but keeps chewing on it and trying to walk herself basically haha. :rolleyes:
    guess ill have to start with the whole carrying a treat as a distraction :)


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 9,767 Mod ✭✭✭✭DBB


    Try attaching a length of ribbon to his collar and let him drag that around at first, picking it up to lead him over to his dinner bowl, or to a treat dropped on the floor ahead of him, or to someone calling him over to them. Then graduate him onto a light lead, then do the same out in the garden, then out in the big bad world.
    Use plenty of treats to coax him forwards. When you think about it from pup's point of view, it must feel really weird adjusting to wearing a collar, harness or lead. So, start off as above with an easier or simpler version of what you're working towards, using treats and loads of verbal praise to let pup know he's doing well.
    Good luck!


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,388 ✭✭✭✭Jayop


    Sorry for bumping a really old thread but no need for a new one for a quick question. I read here before but can't find a guide for how long or far you should walk a puppy. I'm afraid of over walking our girl so would love to see it.

    She's about 9 months now, shih tzu cross and loves her walks. We're doing anything from 35 minutes to an hour. 2.5 kms up to maybe 4ish tops usually. Are we walking too much? I don't think I'd do more because at the longer end she's tired for the last few minutes and her wee legs couldn't take more.


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 9,767 Mod ✭✭✭✭DBB


    The rule of thumb is 5 mins per month of life, up until the dog is physically mature. Your wee one probably isn't a million miles off that now, so whilst I wouldn't be going jogging or mountain climbing with her just yet, what you're doing sounds good.
    Whilst it's a bigger issue for large breed dogs, it's no harm to go easy on the smaller ones too until they're 12-18 months old before you start more challenging stuff :)


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,388 ✭✭✭✭Jayop


    That's the one cheers. Yeah so 45 minutes now should be the limit. I tend to stick on a podcast about that long and aim to have the whole thing done when we're home.

    Thanks for that!


Advertisement