Advertisement
If you have a new account but are having problems posting or verifying your account, please email us on hello@boards.ie for help. Thanks :)
Hello all! Please ensure that you are posting a new thread or question in the appropriate forum. The Feedback forum is overwhelmed with questions that are having to be moved elsewhere. If you need help to verify your account contact hello@boards.ie
Please note that it is not permitted to have referral links posted in your signature. Keep these links contained in the appropriate forum. Thank you.

https://www.boards.ie/discussion/2055940817/signature-rules

No puncture - tyre filler??

Options
  • 16-09-2012 7:48pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 3,765 ✭✭✭


    Perhaps someone can help with this question. Apols in advance for vagueness and lack of info.

    Is there something I can get sprayed in to my tyres (in somewhere like Halfords) that will help stop me getting punctures?

    What is this called? And is it worth getting done?


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 22,306 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    I was in Fast Fit / aka First Point recently and saw a poster advising (I think) four wheel treatment for either €85 (or €65 - wasn't paying too much attention tbh).

    It won't stop you getting punctures :) but in most circumstances (nail/screw or similar) it should prevent a flat tyre, although you might lose some pressure.

    I use a 12v air compressor off the cigarette lighter, and as most flats are caused by 'slow' punctures, have always been able to re-inflate the tyre and get the puncture repaired at my leisure. Can't remember the last time I had to change a wheel - at least 20 years ago! I also carry a repair kit, which you can get in a motor factors. They will also have compressors, but not as cheap as ebay or Tesco.

    You can get a basic compressor incl. postage from China/Hong Kong via ebay.co.uk (see here) (a lot cheaper than ebay.com for some reason) for less than €10 incl. postage. In large Tescos, the same one is €22. Not worth paying more than this imo - Argos ones are about €40 to €60, but the cheaper does the job fine. Remember not to run them for more than 10 minutes continuously. You are supposed to rest them for 10 minutes then to avoid overheating, which knackers them. 10 minutes should re-inflate an average completely flat tyre to 30psi.

    You can also but the treatment you are asking about from ebay here and fit it yourself. From what I remember, you have to remove the valve to inject the gunk into the tyre.

    Finally, you can also buy a pressurised can (Tyreweld is the best known name) which claims to re-inflate a flat and seal the puncture. With this, you have to drive the car immediately afterwards, because it requires centrifugal force to get the gunk to the punctured area. This is best described as a temporary, get you to a garage fix.

    Neither the sealant or the Tyreweld will work unless the sealant material can get to the puncture via centrifugal force (i.e. the wheel is turning).

    Also, neither will be effective against a puncture in the sidewall area of the tyre.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,733 ✭✭✭✭corktina


    they do recomend that you park the vehicle with the puncture at the bottom of the wheel...if you know where it si I guess. It does work , i have used it.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,608 ✭✭✭obi604


    Esel wrote: »



    I use a 12v air compressor off the cigarette lighter, and as most flats are caused by 'slow' punctures, have always been able to re-inflate the tyre and get the puncture repaired at my leisure. Can't remember the last time I had to change a wheel - at least 20 years ago! I also carry a repair kit, which you can get in a motor factors. They will also have compressors, but not as cheap as ebay or Tesco.

    So lets take a real world example

    I drive a BMW with no spare wheel
    I come out to my car one day and find a tyre very flat
    I then get my 12v air compressor, plug it in to the valve in the wheel
    Then turn it on and let it do its inflating for 10 minutes where it will hopefully inflate the tyre to 30 psi ( would I physically have to hold this device on the valve of the wheel for the 10 minutes ? )


    the tyre now should physically look as if its not flat anymore.
    I would then get in my car and drive to the nearest garage to get this fixed ( how long could I drive for )


    Am I right in thinking this is how this works ?

    i.e. NO car jacks, spare wheel, tyre gunk, loosening of wheel nuts etc


  • Registered Users Posts: 22,306 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    obi604 wrote: »
    So lets take a real world example

    I drive a BMW with no spare wheel
    I come out to my car one day and find a tyre very flat
    I then get my 12v air compressor, plug it in to the valve in the wheel
    Then turn it on and let it do its inflating for 10 minutes where it will hopefully inflate the tyre to 30 psi ( would I physically have to hold this device on the valve of the wheel for the 10 minutes ? )


    the tyre now should physically look as if its not flat anymore.
    I would then get in my car and drive to the nearest garage to get this fixed ( how long could I drive for )


    Am I right in thinking this is how this works ?

    i.e. NO car jacks, spare wheel, tyre gunk, loosening of wheel nuts etc
    Answered in your thread here.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Registered Users Posts: 388 ✭✭Rob32


    obi604 wrote: »
    So lets take a real world example

    I drive a BMW with no spare wheel


    So you have run flats then problem solved :P

    The stuff thats put in the tyres for 65 doesnt work, I know for fact in work in a garage that does it, its crap.

    That tyreweld can work but its very hit and miss, personally id get a compressor or learn how to change a wheel quickly and just get the puncture fixed.


  • Advertisement
  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,223 ✭✭✭Nissan doctor


    These puncture solutions like tyre weld, prevent-a-puncture etc can actually be more dangerous as even if they do work and seal the puncture(they very rarely do) you could easily still have damage to the tyre that could cause a blow out.

    This is why tyres are removed and inspected when having a puncture repaired properly.

    IMO there is no reasons that a healthy person with a licence can't learn to change a wheel very easily and if there are genuine reasons that a driver can't change a wheel then almost all insurance policies have breakdown cover.

    For the most part, these in a can puncture solutions only work in lab type conditions and rarely work for real world tyre damage caused by any shape or size of object, impact damage, sidewall damage etc etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,608 ✭✭✭obi604


    These puncture solutions like tyre weld, prevent-a-puncture etc can actually be more dangerous as even if they do work and seal the puncture(they very rarely do) you could easily still have damage to the tyre that could cause a blow out.

    This is why tyres are removed and inspected when having a puncture repaired properly.

    IMO there is no reasons that a healthy person with a licence can't learn to change a wheel very easily and if there are genuine reasons that a driver can't change a wheel then almost all insurance policies have breakdown cover.

    For the most part, these in a can puncture solutions only work in lab type conditions and rarely work for real world tyre damage caused by any shape or size of object, impact damage, sidewall damage etc etc.


    I've no bother at all in changing a tyre, in fact I'd love to change a tyre in this situation but see this thread for my reasons : http://touch.boards.ie/thread/2056760581?page=1


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,223 ✭✭✭Nissan doctor


    obi604 wrote: »
    I've no bother at all in changing a tyre, in fact I'd love to change a tyre in this situation but see this thread for my reasons : http://touch.boards.ie/thread/2056760581?page=1


    I'd still rather get a space saver spare wheel, jack and wheel brace from a breakers yard and secure them in the boot.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,468 ✭✭✭Markcheese


    The last few times I've gone to change a tyre on my van I've struggled to get the wheel nuts off..(and I'm no light weight) . So if I can get to a tyre fitters and get them to do it , then I'm thrilled. 12v pump all the way...

    Slava ukraini 🇺🇦



  • Registered Users Posts: 5,608 ✭✭✭obi604


    obi604 wrote: »
    I've no bother at all in changing a tyre, in fact I'd love to change a tyre in this situation but see this thread for my reasons : http://touch.boards.ie/thread/2056760581?page=1


    I'd still rather get a space saver spare wheel, jack and wheel brace from a breakers yard and secure them in the boot.


    I'd love that too if I could have the space saver etc stored below the boot level and out of view

    Feckin BMW and their stupid run flats


  • Advertisement
  • Registered Users Posts: 22,306 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    Markcheese wrote: »
    The last few times I've gone to change a tyre on my van I've struggled to get the wheel nuts off..(and I'm no light weight) . So if I can get to a tyre fitters and get them to do it , then I'm thrilled. 12v pump all the way...
    Get one of those extendible wheel socket wrenches. The socket is reversible (i.e. 2 sizes). Lidl occasionally have them for about €8. Large Tescos (e.g. Clarehall, Clearwater etc.) have them for about €13.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 51,688 Mod ✭✭✭✭Stheno


    Esel wrote: »
    Get one of those extendible wheel socket wrenches. The socket is reversible (i.e. 2 sizes). Lidl occasionally have them for about €8. Large Tescos (e.g. Clarehall, Clearwater etc.) have them for about €13.

    I've one of those, the problem i have is that if I get a puncture 100 miles away from home, I'm on a space saver that I can't or shouldn't go over 60km/h on, and I travel an awful lot with work.

    I've a compressor in the car as part of my breakdown kit, so hopefully I'll not get stuck unless I get a blow out.

    Tyre pressure, oil, water, and coolant checked weekly


  • Registered Users Posts: 22,306 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    Stheno wrote: »
    I've a compressor in the car as part of my breakdown kit, so hopefully I'll not get stuck unless I get a blow out.
    So have I. Haven't had to change a wheel in nearly 20 years. Got it for the motorbike originally. I'm on about my fourth one now, they burn out eventually. I carry two these days to cover that eventuality.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,056 ✭✭✭✭BostonB


    Markcheese wrote: »
    The last few times I've gone to change a tyre on my van I've struggled to get the wheel nuts off..(and I'm no light weight) . So if I can get to a tyre fitters and get them to do it , then I'm thrilled. 12v pump all the way...

    Not really with you there. if you stand on the brace and bounce I'd bet 99% of nuts will move.

    I think you problem is repeating itself. Tyre fitters often over tighten them with the impact wrenches. And you keep going back to them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 22,306 ✭✭✭✭Esel


    BostonB wrote: »
    Tyre fitters often over tighten them with the impact wrenches. And you keep going back to them.
    Any decent tyre fitter should use a torque wrench.

    Not your ornery onager



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,056 ✭✭✭✭BostonB


    They also shouldn't be stocking chinese banger spinners. But they do.

    I rang about 6 or 7 places last week looking for a few tyres of a know brand and asked them for specific type of tyre and the model number. Everyone of them offered some no name brand tyre I'd never head and it was like getting blood from a stone trying to find a model name.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,223 ✭✭✭Nissan doctor


    BostonB wrote: »
    They also shouldn't be stocking chinese banger spinners. But they do.

    I rang about 6 or 7 places last week looking for a few tyres of a know brand and asked them for specific type of tyre and the model number. Everyone of them offered some no name brand tyre I'd never head and it was like getting blood from a stone trying to find a model name.


    On this point....I agree fully, but unfortunately what the customer wants has to be stocked, and what the majority of customers want is the cheapest tyres you have....brand, grip etc are irrelevant to them.

    I can think of no reason why any competent tyre supplier could not at least check availability of any brands that you are looking for though.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 18,056 ✭✭✭✭BostonB


    See it not enough to have the right brand you need to know the model.

    I was looking for all seasons and every tyre offered was a summer tyre and told it was all season.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 8,223 ✭✭✭Nissan doctor


    BostonB wrote: »
    See it not enough to have the right brand you need to know the model.

    I was looking for all seasons and every tyre offered was a summer tyre and told it was all season.


    I don't under stand why many places don't tbh. Even if you don't know all the exact brands, models and sub models off the top of your head(no-one will know them all) there is still no reason not to be able to tell the customer what's available as proper suppliers have online access to the main suppliers stock.

    A decent place should also know the factory fitments/specs for at least most premium/performance cars as these tent to be the ones that customers have the the most specific requirements for.


Advertisement