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near complete dino fossil found near Aix-en-Provence, France

Comments



  • Curse my lack of French fluency! :o




  • I've no credit I'm French :)




  • Nice. I think it's the sauropod Atsinganosaurus -- the 'Gypsy Dinosaur'.

    Here's an English press release

    Six tonnes seems very slight for a sauropod. Europe during the Cretaceous period consisted mostly of Islands. Could this be a case of island dwarfism?




  • The article alludes to the new dinosaur (Atsinganosaurus velauciensis) being related to Magyarosaurus, which was only half the size. So yes, insular dwarfism seems quite likely in my opinion..




  • I was wrong about the skull, they are saying the main thing missing is the skull, duh.

    Found another article with other titbits of information :
    Sur le même site, de nombreux autres fossiles ont été découverts, tous datant
    de la période du Crétacé supérieur, il y a 75 millions d'années, juste avant
    l'extinction des dinosaures. Parmi lesquels un crâne de crocodile, des carapaces et plastrons de tortues, ainsi que des ossements d'autres dinosaures
    (Ankylosaure, Rhabdodon, etc.).

    "Ces carcasses enchevêtrées les unes aux autres ont été transportées à faible courant, d'où leur état de conservation assez exceptionnel", précise Mme Garcia.
    on the same site, numerous other fossils have been found, all dating from the superior Cretaceous, 75 M years ago, just before the extinction of dinosaurs. Among them a crocodile skull, turtle shells and "shells-that-go-at-the-front-on-their-chest-thingummies" (here's an English word I never came across before :P ), and various bones of other dinos....
    These intermingled carcasses have been carried/transported by a very weak current, and so have been rather exceptionnally well preserved.


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  • Ziphius wrote: »
    Nice. I think it's the sauropod Atsinganosaurus -- the 'Gypsy Dinosaur'.

    Here's an English press release

    Six tonnes seems very slight for a sauropod. Europe during the Cretaceous period consisted mostly of Islands. Could this be a case of island dwarfism?

    According to this article you could be right http://www.museum-aix-en-provence.org/histoire_paleontologie.htm . They say that Sainte Victoire, a mountain where most of the eggs and fossils are found in the area, was encircled by 2 seas.
    Although they also in the same breath talk about a "gutter style" depression where the eggs sank and fossilised. The folds in that spot at the time distorted with geological evolution, and built up into the present mountain. Some of the folds now exposed are said to be practically all broken eggs material (with some intact), in a red sandstone (not sure about the sandstone, sediment type of stone ?).


    edit : found a map of superior Cretaceous ! http://lavignejp.free.fr/blcp/blcp-cretasup-02.htm
    blcp-cretasup.jpg
    I guess Isthme Durancien is the spot we're talking about here, that's where Ste Victoire is now located.


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