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Applied Computing

  • #1
    Registered Users Posts: 5 ✭✭✭ unitedhatred


    Thinking of taking this course this year, and was just wondering what it's like.

    So has anyone here taken it, are you doing it, have you heard something about it? If so, can you let me know what it is like.

    Cheers.

    PS, what is "Personal and Professional Development" and "Personal Development"?


Comments



  • I finished that course last year. From looking at the website, it's changed a bit in the last 5 years.

    I'm not sure what 'personal and professional development' is, but 'student development' was a 'get to know one another' type of thing, to combat computer enthusiasts typically antisocial stereotype. When I was there, we went bowling and paintballing for a couple of classes, did some riddle solving and logical thinking exercises for others.

    The workload increases year by year as with any course, but the first year and first semester in particular may be boringly slow. It does pick up after that. The lecturers I had were all grand, approachable and helpful.




  • I have been offered this course and I think I will accept it. Before I do, I would love some further reassurance on here if possible.

    Firstly, I understand there are a few math modules present in this course, and that math in general has a massive role in the IT sector. This has always been a worry for me as my mathematical ability would be limited. I did manage to obtain a D1 in my leaving cert at ordinary level, all be it with quite a bit of effort. I have heard from people doing computing courses in LYIT that the math isn't that hard, they compare it to leaving cert maths. If any of you have done a computing course in LYIT, would you be of the opinion that a potential student must be better than average at math?

    I'm also curious in regards to some of the modules. I understand the programming is rather challenging, even at the start. What programming languages are covered in this course? I heard it was C++ and Java from a first year computing student last year. Would this be correct?

    If anyone would care to give their opinion on any of the other modules it would also be hugely appreciated.

    Thanks guys!




  • My leaving cert maths was pretty bad. I think it was a D-something in ordinary level as well.

    The maths done in the computing course is (or seems anyway) a lot more practical than most of the stuff covered in LC. From what I remember of first year, a lot of it was number systems, IE binary, octal, hexadecimal. They're all much the same, you just go from single to double digits at different points.

    I scraped by in one maths test with 35%, I think that was my lowest result during the course, but still counted as a pass as I'd passed everything else. That was without doing any study or preparation outside class, so it could easily have gone better with some work.

    With regards to languages, I didn't do any C++. Perhaps that person was doing the games design course?
    We started off with Java and had one or two modules in Java at all times throughout the course. We did two modules in C# which is similar enough to Java. One module in perl, one in python, two or three in PHP and Javascript, one in HTML, and a good lot of SQL (going between Access, MySQL, SQL Server, and Oracle).

    I wouldn't say the programming is particularly challenging, but I might have had an advantage from using a drag-and-drop game making program when I was younger, which it turns out, teaches the basics of OO programming quite well.
    Regardless, the trick when starting off is to not try and know everything. In the first few weeks, 70% or so of any programs you write will be stuff you don't, and don't need to (at that point), understand.
    Some lecturers in the college were of the opinion that Python would be a better starting off language, as it doesn't have as much of the fluff as Java. Not sure if anything has changed though.

    From the other modules, I remember that the robotics class was good fun, and we had an image processing class which was good, but it seems to be gone now. The networking classes weren't great, but that might have just been me.




  • Thanks for your detailed response. I think with a bit of effort I should be fine. I suppose there is always the option of extra tuition too if I find myself stuggling.




  • TPD wrote: »
    I finished that course last year. From looking at the website, it's changed a bit in the last 5 years.

    I'm not sure what 'personal and professional development' is, but 'student development' was a 'get to know one another' type of thing, to combat computer enthusiasts typically antisocial stereotype. When I was there, we went bowling and paintballing for a couple of classes, did some riddle solving and logical thinking exercises for others.

    The workload increases year by year as with any course, but the first year and first semester in particular may be boringly slow. It does pick up after that. The lecturers I had were all grand, approachable and helpful.

    What kind of hours did the course run over each week?


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  • What kind of hours did the course run over each week?

    25 hours a week I think, we never had any semesters with a day off. Generally two days of 9.30-3.30ish, two of 9.30-5.30ish, and on a Friday 9.30-1.30ish. There were a couple of semesters with a two hour lunch one day, and one with two one hour breaks with a class in between. Not the greatest timetables, I think we got the shítty end of the stick because we were a small class.




  • I'm currently doing it. It's not that bad as long as you have a genuine interest in the workings of computers and the likes. There may be some things you just won't like in the course but it's a good course!




  • I'm a mature student, who hadn't studied Maths in years and knew nothing about programming - but starting 3rd year next week! As already mentioned, first year can be a bit too easy - with the result that we lost over half the class in 2nd year (from 37 to 18). I expect we'll loose a few more this year.

    The lecturers are all grand, and will genuinely try to get you to do well, but only if you regularly go to their class! In fact, that is the real key to doing this course, turning up! There is so many new concepts to pick up, especially at the beginning, that if you miss a few classes, it can be difficult to pick up what everyone else is talking about. :confused:
    I have small kids which means that I don't have a lot of time at home to study or dedicate to college work, so going in and actively participating is how I'm managing to keep on top of it.

    I had another look at the prospectus on the web-site, and afaik that's outdated. This semester the modules are all changing following their 5 year review/plan. Not sure what to expect, but we did hear that some modules where being combined, meaning less individual subjects, but higher credits per module.

    Enjoy semester 1, start every assignment asap, make sure your assignments are handed up on time and are presented in the right format (font, spacing, cover sheet, folder etc), go to every practical lab (and every single lecture of Java is important!), aim to pass everything first time - get to the coffee dock early as the queue can be a killer!

    If you need any help, drop back in here and ask. :)




  • How much work is there to do "outside class" if you know what I mean -assignments and that.

    And do you have any idea what Personal and Professional Development is?
    And what kind of hours did your course run over?
    Also, is there a work placement in this course?


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