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T. rex bite Force Study

Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 Niggos
    Banned


    "T. rex has most powerful bite of any terrestrial animal"

    Including the blue whale?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Niggos wrote: »
    "T. rex has most powerful bite of any terrestrial animal"

    Including the blue whale?

    Terrestrial means 'land based'. Plus the blue whale does not have a particularly strong bite despite its enormous size. It kind of sucks up tiny prey instead of directly biting anything.
    Apparently the prehistoric super shark called megalodon has the strongest bite of all (if you include sea creatures).
    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1509266/megalodons_bite_strongest_according_to_computer_models/


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 Niggos
    Banned


    But didn't whales live on the land back in the days of the dinosaurs?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Niggos wrote: »
    But didn't whales live on the land back in the days of the dinosaurs?

    The first whales (that we know of) didn't appear until after the giant dinosaurs were wiped out some 65 million years ago, but yes the earliest members of the whale family did indeed live on land. However their size and probable bite force would have paled in comparison to a Tyrannosaurus.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 Niggos
    Banned


    There's no way a T-rex could have a blue whale, no fukking way.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Niggos wrote: »
    There's no way a T-rex could have a blue whale, no fukking way.

    Perhaps you have misinterpreted the thread or you are simply trying to get a rise out of the natives, but the article cited in the OP does not say anything in relation to 'who would win in a fight', nor does it mention aquatic animals, so I'm not really sure where your comment is coming from.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 10 Niggos
    Banned


    All the whale would have to do was roll over and squish him. How could a T-rex recover from that?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Hmm, I get the distinct impression you are trolling now. I fancy sleeping right now but feel uncomfortable leaving you alone in the forum in case you break something so I'm going to take the liberty of banning you until morning. Hopefully by then I'll have figured out what to do with you.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    I don´t see how this is news :( Didn´t we all know that already?


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    I don´t see how this is news :( Didn´t we all know that already?

    Yeah, it would appear a team published a study pretty much identical to one which had been done before. I suppose that's part of science though, others being able to verify results through recreation and repetition. Still though, would have been nice to measure a Spinosaurus or Torvosaurus or something.

    edit: Actually, that's not entirely fair on the team. They did include juvenile Tyrannosuarus too to see if their bite was as strong when scaled up (turns out it wasn't) which ads proof to the idea that juveniles ate different prey to their parents.


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  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Yeah, it would appear a team published a study pretty much identical to one which had been done before. I suppose that's part of science though, others being able to verify results through recreation and repetition. Still though, would have been nice to measure a Spinosaurus or Torvosaurus or something.

    edit: Actually, that's not entirely fair on the team. They did include juvenile Tyrannosuarus too to see if their bite was as strong when scaled up (turns out it wasn't) which ads proof to the idea that juveniles ate different prey to their parents.

    Well, that was to be expected really considering how narrow the juvenile's snout is. But fine :o


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Not to mention comparatively narrower teeth...


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,480 ✭✭✭✭ steddyeddy
    Registered User


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Terrestrial means 'land based'. Plus the blue whale does not have a particularly strong bite despite its enormous size. It kind of sucks up tiny prey instead of directly biting anything.
    Apparently the prehistoric super shark called megalodon has the strongest bite of all (if you include sea creatures).
    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1509266/megalodons_bite_strongest_according_to_computer_models/

    No surprise that meg had a strong bite but a consideration must go to the beak strenght of the giant squid also which according to some can bite through steel cables! :O


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    steddyeddy wrote: »
    No surprise that meg had a strong bite but a consideration must go to the beak strenght of the giant squid also which according to some can bite through steel cables! :O

    Are we talking about the jumbo squid or the giant-giant squid? :O If its the former, imagine what a giant, or a colossal squid could bite through :O


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Turns out the colossal squid isn't so tough after all...
    http://www.livescience.com/8234-colossal-squid-monster-study-finds.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,480 ✭✭✭✭ steddyeddy
    Registered User


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Are we talking about the jumbo squid or the giant-giant squid? :O If its the former, imagine what a giant, or a colossal squid could bite through :O

    Only the giant squid's bite was estimated as far as im aware. The humbolt squid also has an exceptionally strong bite for its size! The big daddy of beaked land animals for me is the snapping turtle a wonderfully attractive animal! I wonder if bite researchers take into account the differences between force distribution in beaks and toothed jaws?


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    steddyeddy wrote: »
    Only the giant squid's bite was estimated as far as im aware. The humbolt squid also has an exceptionally strong bite for its size! The big daddy of beaked land animals for me is the snapping turtle a wonderfully attractive animal! I wonder if bite researchers take into account the differences between force distribution in beaks and toothed jaws?

    Snapping turtles, I've worked with them before :D Fortunately, I had no direct experiences when it comes to their bite XD


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Typical, I change my avatar less than a week ago and NOW everyone is talking about snapping turtles!


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,480 ✭✭✭✭ steddyeddy
    Registered User


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Snapping turtles, I've worked with them before :D Fortunately, I had no direct experiences when it comes to their bite XD

    Lucky man Adam Id love to work with them at some point!


  • Registered Users Posts: 27,480 ✭✭✭✭ steddyeddy
    Registered User


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Turns out the colossal squid isn't so tough after all...
    http://www.livescience.com/8234-colossal-squid-monster-study-finds.html


    I never pictured the Colossal squid as a fast hunter apart from the metobolisim they dont have a fantastic hydrodynamic structure. Although Im guessing they are intelligent being of the class cephlopoda. I would say they are strong when they want to be aswell.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Quite possible. As the aforementioned snapping turtle doesn't look too quick, but stick your hand in his gob and you'll know the truth soon enough!


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    Galvasean wrote: »
    Quite possible. As the aforementioned snapping turtle doesn't look too quick, but stick your hand in his gob and you'll know the truth soon enough!

    They may not be quick themselves but the speed at which they snap their jaws... :eek:

    And that reminds me... I think if they did a study on the bite of ceratopsians, it would throw some impressive results as well...
    100_1398.JPG

    tumblr_ln01uv5YNH1qapg66o1_500.jpg


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,759 ✭✭✭✭ dlofnep


    As far as I'm concerned, T-Rex would have kicked seven shades of shíte out of Spinosaurus.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    There's a new study about crocodilian bite forces, and it seems that the saltwater crocodile, unsurprisingly, has the strongest bite of any animal nowadays, reaching (get this) the lowest estimates for T-Rex's bite force!! That's pretty damn impressive if we consider that T-Rex could be six to nine times larger than the largest salties around today.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/120315-crocodiles-bite-force-erickson-science-plos-one-strongest/

    The article also mentions that T-Rex may have had a stronger bite than currently believed, seeing as we only have its fossilized bones to go by, but even so, it is possible that Deinosuchus and other giant crocodilians of prehistory had even stronger bites.

    There's only one animal that could perhaps equal or exceed the saltwater crocodile's bite nowadays- the great white shark, but according to the article, its bite force hasn´t been directly measured. (I thought it had been... weird, false memories?). And of course, Megalodon likely beat anything else.

    (This is an American gator btw, not a croc. Before this study, gators were had the strongest recorded bite among animals)

    crocodile-bite-test-strength-measured_50088_600x450.jpg


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,759 ✭✭✭✭ dlofnep


    Look at how happy he looks to bite on something. Nom nom nom..


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    dlofnep wrote: »
    Look at how happy he looks to bite on something. Nom nom nom..

    Never trust an animal that has a constant naturally occurring grin. cats, dolphins, 'gators... all of them assholes.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 20,759 ✭✭✭✭ dlofnep


    A dolphin's smile is very deceptive.


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 5,279 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Adam Khor
    Moderator


    Axolotls must be evil too, then...
    axolotl-foto-1.jpg


  • Registered Users Posts: 30,746 ✭✭✭✭ Galvasean
    Registered User


    Adam Khor wrote: »
    Axolotls must be evil too, then...
    axolotl-foto-1.jpg

    Kill it with fire!


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