Advertisement
Where is Report Post on mobile? We've made a slight change, see here
Have your say on the future of the 'Save Draft' feature in this poll
MODs please see this information notice in the mod's forum. Thanks!
How to add spoiler tags, edit posts, add images etc. How to - a user's guide to the new version of Boards

Most employable + best paying job (excluding medicine, maths and engineering)?

  • 24-01-2012 10:38pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 1,044 ✭✭✭ Cill94


    I'm in 6th year, have to choose courses for uni and all that. I've taken interest tests and the like and still can't decide what I want to do and probably never will. All I know is that what I DO want is to come out of college with a useful degree and more importantly one that will get me a well paying job that will get me out of living at home and eventually pay a very comfortable salary.

    I'm pretty studious (expecting upwards of 540 in the LC) so I'd like to think with hard work I can do anything I commit to. Just wanted to know if anyone who has better knowledge of the graduate job market and prospects could tell me what they would consider to be the most financially valuable degree at the moment?


Comments



  • Accountancy




  • mikemac1 wrote: »
    Accountancy

    Only thing that puts me off that is all the stereotypes of it being the most boring job in the world? Could be worth it for the money and job security though!




  • Do something based on how much you like it, not how much you will get paid (or however easy you think it will be to be employed).

    You won't be happy in a job that you don't like. If you find something you really like doing, then your job won't feel like work! It's easier to keep yourself motivated if you enjoy what you do. If you don't like numbers/finance then you won't enjoy studying accountancy, regardless of how well paid you will be!

    What are your interests? If salary/employability was irrelevant, what job you would you prefer to do?

    Don't pay too much attention to those online career tests - my number 1 happened to be the same as the job I want to do when I'm older, but for a lot of people it's way off the mark - I certainly wouldn't base any choices on it, we were made do it in career guidance in secondary school - otherwise I wouldn't have bothered!




  • Do something based on how much you like it, not how much you will get paid (or however easy you think it will be to be employed).

    You won't be happy in a job that you don't like. If you find something you really like doing, then your job won't feel like work! It's easier to keep yourself motivated if you enjoy what you do. If you don't like numbers/finance then you won't enjoy studying accountancy, regardless of how well paid you will be!

    What are your interests? If salary/employability was irrelevant, what job you would you prefer to do?

    Don't pay too much attention to those online career tests - my number 1 happened to be the same as the job I want to do when I'm older, but for a lot of people it's way off the mark - I certainly wouldn't base any choices on it, we were made do it in career guidance in secondary school - otherwise I wouldn't have bothered!

    I've seen two guidance councilors so far and they've both concluded that my verbal reasoning is my strong point and that I should do any combination of arts courses including English, Psychology, Philosophy, German etc. But the general verdict on arts courses these days is that it's paying for 4 years of doing an irrelevant subject that won't get you a job..and that would kinda suck.




  • So do you want to work in sales maybe?

    Some people are naturals at it
    And some would rather die then make a cold call

    It's not for everyone but if you're good then the money can be excellent

    But yeah, don't focus so much on the money at this stage


  • Advertisement


  • If you are expecting 500+ points don't do an arts course UNLESS you are very interested in the subjects you pick and are willing to work very hard at them. Arts isn't 'useless' like many people say but a mediocre result in subjects you're not passionate about kinda is. If you do well arts can be a good foundation for postgraduate study in all sorts of areas.
    I think it's unusual (in a good way!) that you are working that hard for the LC without a particular career in mind. All the 500+ guys in my school were fairly sure of what they wanted! Fair play to you though, if you keep up that level of work you will do well, just try to find something you're interested in and don't get hung up on money




  • How do you decide at 17/18 what you want to do for the rest of your life??? - you cant.
    What gets you a job now might not in 4 years time....
    I'd recommend firstly getting a degree. Be it science, Arts, engineering or whatever. Once you have a degree you open up further opportunities.
    I worked in the IT industry and a lot of my colleagues had studied different courses such as engineering or arts or even commerce before doing a one year post grad in software development.
    Theres also careers in the ESB, Gardai, Civil Service(may take a while), An Post,
    hse (maybe paramedic) which would all benefit from a college degree.




  • Cill94 wrote: »
    I'm in 6th year, have to choose courses for uni and all that. I've taken interest tests and the like and still can't decide what I want to do and probably never will. All I know is that what I DO want is to come out of college with a useful degree and more importantly one that will get me a well paying job that will get me out of living at home and eventually pay a very comfortable salary.

    I'm pretty studious (expecting upwards of 540 in the LC) so I'd like to think with hard work I can do anything I commit to. Just wanted to know if anyone who has better knowledge of the graduate job market and prospects could tell me what they would consider to be the most financially valuable degree at the moment?

    What is a very valuable degree would be the BSc in Mathematical Science (highly recommended!!) followed by a masters in Finance in Trinity. Then go to London/ any big financial centre. You will not need to worry about money but this path isn't for everyone obviously.




  • marketty wrote: »
    If you are expecting 500+ points don't do an arts course UNLESS you are very interested in the subjects you pick and are willing to work very hard at them. Arts isn't 'useless' like many people say but a mediocre result in subjects you're not passionate about kinda is. If you do well arts can be a good foundation for postgraduate study in all sorts of areas.
    I think it's unusual (in a good way!) that you are working that hard for the LC without a particular career in mind. All the 500+ guys in my school were fairly sure of what they wanted! Fair play to you though, if you keep up that level of work you will do well, just try to find something you're interested in and don't get hung up on money

    I am very interested in Arts courses, the worry is more that it is an inferior degree to other courses that I could get into. Also, I don't know if I could hack 4 years of being told I'm not doing a proper course by everyone :p




  • How do you decide at 17/18 what you want to do for the rest of your life??? - you cant.
    What gets you a job now might not in 4 years time....
    I'd recommend firstly getting a degree. Be it science, Arts, engineering or whatever. Once you have a degree you open up further opportunities.
    I worked in the IT industry and a lot of my colleagues had studied different courses such as engineering or arts or even commerce before doing a one year post grad in software development.
    Theres also careers in the ESB, Gardai, Civil Service(may take a while), An Post,
    hse (maybe paramedic) which would all benefit from a college degree.

    Yeah you're right, I can't decide at all! Frustratingly, everyone else I know at least has an idea of the area they want to work in e.g. engineering, economics, pharmacy etc. Well I certainly don't want any of the jobs you listed there..I was considering law until I found out how long it takes to become fully qualified and the nonexistent pay (for the first year or two).


  • Advertisement


  • alphanine wrote: »
    What is a very valuable degree would be the BSc in Mathematical Science (highly recommended!!) followed by a masters in Finance in Trinity. Then go to London/ any big financial centre. You will not need to worry about money but this path isn't for everyone obviously.

    Unfortunately maths is not my forté at all (I do ordinary) :( I have friends who are lucky and can pull A's in higher level with minimal effort. That's just not my skill set unfortunately. I'm much better with languages and writing.




  • If you'd like to keep your options open ,commerce with a language would probably suit you (you could also branch into accountancy, management, marketing, sales, translation and more with a degree like this.)




  • Have you ever thought about Journalism? Would be a good option if you've a way with words :) also if your good with languages what about Irish with journalism or business? I wouldn't think that there's many people with that type of qualification!! Could be wrong though. Hope you find something you want to do! :D




  • have you thought about working in a university? If you were to do an arts degree you could become some form of lecturer or researcher - the thought didn't even strike me until recently, now I'm pretty set on becoming a professor. :P If you want to work in a university no degree is useless - you can lecture in anything.

    The big area at the moment is technology, computer science, electronic engineering etc. but if you have no interest in them don't even consider a degree like that, you really have to love technology or it would drive you mad. What about psychology?




  • Don't be too put off at the thought of accountancy. I hated it at school, and would never have dreamed that I'd even think about going down that route, but ended up having to make a bit of a career change at 25 when my first career wasn't the best in terms of job opportunity. I got an entry level accounts job at a multinational company due to my foreign language skills, which I originally just saw as a stop-gap and a way of paying off debts, but turned out it wasn't as boring as I thought! It's a lot more varied than I thought it would be, especially if you chose management accountancy (as opposed to financial accountancy).
    Another thought would be to study a language, that way you have a LOT more doors open to you, whatever you decide to do. There are a lot of degrees you can combine with a language such as commerce and German/law and french etc.Seriously don't underestimate the value of fluency in another language (especially German), both here in Ireland and abroad.




  • I'm exactly the same. The thoughts of doing an Art's degree was never on my mind until Russian was an interest however Accounting is my best subject & I have relatives who own big Accounting companies in Moscow. (it's in the genes).




  • Computer science/ business information systems (and Chinese)




  • As a recent Accounting grad - don`t do Accounting please! I think your 2 best options are :

    1. Computer Science/Software development - this can be used in any subsiquent area and will always stand to you. I can`t think of any job where this would not come in useful. If you did decide you wanted to pursue Accounting/Law exams later this would help get you employed as you would be multi skilled and a big four doesn`t care what you 2,1 or your 1st is in, you have no neccessity to do a degree in these areas to do them as a professional career if that appeals later.

    2. Work for a few years and don`t waste your one free degree till you are sure what you want. There is a market now for call centre workers etc in your age group and the job does have room for career progression fast. Meet people your own age, have fun, discover yourself a bit, learn a language, learn some management skills and a bit about life before you make such a huge decision.
    If you pick some thing now for the sake of it and then discover what you really want later it is a very expensive and difficult path to get there.

    What about UCD Horrizons https://myucd.ucd.ie/aboutucd/ucd_horizons.ezc this may offer you a degree of flexibility and give you the room you need to experiment.


Advertisement