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New Master's programmes in Psychology at UL!!!!

  • 10-10-2011 1:33pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    Hi everyone,

    This is a message to let you all know about our two new Master's programmes at the University of Limerick.

    Master of Science in Psychological Science (MSc) at University of Limerick.


    There are new exciting new streams: Research Methods" and "Applied and Social Psychology". You can chose the stream that best suits your interests and future career.
    Click here for more info: http://goo.gl/39T5B

    Master of Arts in Psychology (MA) at University of Limerick.

    This is a conversion course AND a Master's programme rolled in to one year. he programme is designed for students with prior experiences in psychology and research methods (e.g., BA Joint Honours), providing students with a menu of modules that reflect the breadth of psychological research and its applications.
    Click here for more info: http://goo.gl/ZTzPz

    Please post any questions you have and we will repond as soon as possible. Alternatively contact the Department of Psychology at UL http://goo.gl/dsIb3


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    Here are some comments from the first cohort of the MSc programme when asked to describe the things they liked about the programme:

    The classes available, opportunity to improve presentation skills, working with supervisor on thesis
    Good selection of modules
    Approachable teaching staff
    the assistance from lecturers, the weekly colloquia, and the focus on social research.
    Enhanced my research skills & knowledge of psychology
    Made new friends & acquaintances
    Provided further career options.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29 Shine Star


    Hi..
    I have a question regarding the M.A above. It is a conversion course and a masters in one. I looked into the course on the u.l website and it says that there is an exit option after semester 2 so therefore one would end up with a higher diploma level 8 degree am I right in saying. Just wondering as to the course fees one would pay if they left after semester 2 as opposed to going on to do the semester 3 summer dissertation?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    Thanks for your question. I have been in touch with the fees office & will get a response shortly. Feel free to contact members of the Department with additional questions! http://www2.ul.ie/web/WWW/Faculties/Education_%26_Health_Sciences/Departments/Psychology


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    Just to let you all know that now there is a new Clinical stream on the MSc course - great course for those of you with clinical interests. Please contact the Psychology Department at UL for further information http://www2.ul.ie/web/WWW/Faculties/Education_%26_Health_Sciences/Departments/Psychology


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    Shine Star wrote: »
    Hi..
    I have a question regarding the M.A above. It is a conversion course and a masters in one. I looked into the course on the u.l website and it says that there is an exit option after semester 2 so therefore one would end up with a higher diploma level 8 degree am I right in saying. Just wondering as to the course fees one would pay if they left after semester 2 as opposed to going on to do the semester 3 summer dissertation?
    Hi
    I have checked with the fees office and it turns out that there is a set price for the course, but if you decide to leave after 2 semesters (without completing dissertation) then you can discuss with the fees office directly regarding how to claim back some of the total fees.

    Hope this helps somewhat.
    Please feel free to contact Caroline Rafter at the psychology Department directly if you require more information, [email protected]

    Best Regards,
    UL Psychology

    Follow us on Twitter for regular updates
    UL Psychology
    @ULPsych


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 162 ✭✭ xerpae


    Hi, is the MA in Psychology going to be accredited by the PSI?
    Thanks


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    xerpae wrote: »
    Hi, is the MA in Psychology going to be accredited by the PSI?
    Thanks


    Hi there,
    Thanks for the interest. According to PSI/BPS guidelines, a programme needs to be up and running for its full duration (MA = 1 year) before it can be assessed and given accreditation. This year 2011-12 is the first for the MA and it will go through the accreditation process thereafter. We expect that it will be accredited - news will be posted on the website, twitter, & Facebook.
    Feel free to contact members of staff directly. Here is the psychology website: http://www2.ul.ie/web/WWW/Faculties/Education_%26_Health_Sciences/Departments/Psychology

    Best regards,
    UL Psychology


  • Registered Users Posts: 9 Spom


    Hi, I am thinking of applying for the Msc. I am hoping to get a place on a Clinical Psychology programme someday in the future and the general advise I have recieved for my next step academically is to pursue a masters in a clinically relevant area that has a research component. I've noticed that a good number of successful applicants for Clinical Psychology have their masters in Applied Psychology for example.

    I see that the course page states that it provides an excellent basis for entry to doctorate level programmes, but I wonder does that mean solely entry to phD by research? My query is as to whether it is likely that this course would be as beneficial to my goal of pursuing Clinical Psych as pursuing a Msc in Applied Psychology or the like would? Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 29 Shine Star


    Cordellia wrote: »
    Hi
    I have checked with the fees office and it turns out that there is a set price for the course, but if you decide to leave after 2 semesters (without completing dissertation) then you can discuss with the fees office directly regarding how to claim back some of the total fees.

    Hope this helps somewhat.
    Please feel free to contact Caroline Rafter at the psychology Department directly if you require more information, [email protected]

    Best Regards,
    UL Psychology

    Follow us on Twitter for regular updates
    UL Psychology
    @ULPsych

    Thanks very much for the above info Cordelia. :)


  • Registered Users Posts: 29 Shine Star


    Hi again,

    I just saw there the MA course is currently being taught this year for the first time. I wasn't too sure if it went ahead this time round. I was just wondering as to the number of students that were accepted on to the course and how many days in the week are lectures? Is it an intense course with hours and that? I presume it would probably be in or around the same next sept starting. So a rough idea would be very much appreciated as I could do with all the info necessary to make a decision as to application for this course.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 7 Cordellia


    Thank you very much for your comments and questions.
    The MSc in Clinical Psychology has many benefits, including the following (which are particularly of interest if you wish to apply for a doctorate in Clinical Psychology:

    1. The course requires you to complete 4 Core Advanced Research Methods Modules (advanced research methods & design, including qualitative and quantitative methods). This is a key criteria for obtaining a place on Doctoral training programme (and most areas of psychology).Do not worry if your statistical knowledge is rusty, the courses start at the beginning but then rapidly take your statistical knowledge to a much higher level than undergraduate courses.

    2. You will take 2 core modules in Clinical psychology: those that are currently available are CLINICAL MODELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS (PS6091) and METHODS OF CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS AND INTERVENTION (PS6092). Additional modules may be available in the future. These modules will be taught by experts in the field of clinical psychology.

    3. The MSc course increases your core psychological knowledge (you chose areas of interest to you) and you will take two professional skills modules (developing skills that are essential for any professional psychology track).

    4. You will conduct a major research project in an area that is particularly interesting to you (e.g., an aspect of clinical psychology) under the supervision of a lecturer who is a specialist in that subject area or methodology. This gives you first-hand experience conducting high-quality research at graduate school (and gives you plenty to discuss at potential interviews for doctoral programmes).

    5. An MSc is an impressive additional degree to add to your list of qualifications.

    The Doctoral programmes in Clinical are extremely competitive - there are no guarantees about securing a place - however, the MSc in clinical psychology is a specialized programme that makes you a highly competitive candidate.

    Please feel free to contact a member of the UL psychology team if you have any questions. We look forward to hearing from you!

    Best regards,
    UL Psychology
    ______________________________________________

    Hi, I am thinking of applying for the Msc. I am hoping to get a place on a Clinical Psychology programme someday in the future and the general advise I have recieved for my next step academically is to pursue a masters in a clinically relevant area that has a research component. I've noticed that a good number of successful applicants for Clinical Psychology have their masters in Applied Psychology for example.

    I see that the course page states that it provides an excellent basis for entry to doctorate level programmes, but I wonder does that mean solely entry to phD by research? My query is as to whether it is likely that this course would be as beneficial to my goal of pursuing Clinical Psych as pursuing a Msc in Applied Psychology or the like would? Thanks.[/QUOTE]


  • Registered Users Posts: 2 thelastone


    I am thinking of applying to the MSc this year. I was just wondering is there any way of contacting past students to see how they got on and what they are doing now? I am between this and Applied Psychology. Thanks!


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 ailyoc


    I literally come on to ask the same question as thelastone. Just wondering if there are any previous graduates around and what benefit to them the Master's program was. Are there jobs around for graduates?


  • Registered Users Posts: 77 ✭✭ April4


    In regards to the MA in Psychology, I'm just wondering what is the timetable like? Is the workload very heavy? Does this course act as a conversion?


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,083 ✭✭✭ sambuka41


    Hi Guys just wondering if you came across any more information on the Msc in clinical? I am also looking towards clinical phd and looking at this as an option. I think I just missed the closing date though! :(


  • Registered Users Posts: 28 XMASSmrstobe


    Hi April4,

    The M.A. does function as a conversion however, the drop out option is not accredited so it is one full year including dissertation. The workload on the M.A. is not too bad but the timetabling is awful so 15 hours ish is spread over 5 days so it is tough to work! :eek: I've just completed it so feel free to PM me.

    Hope this helps,
    Katie.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 lizgillen


    Hi katie
    Can you give me a list of recommended reading/textbooks for the MA Psychology conversion ?I am considering applying but I definitely need to upgrade my knowledge first


  • Registered Users Posts: 28 XMASSmrstobe


    Hi Lizgillen,

    I'm sure you know but the course content/modules are listed here:
    http://www.ul.ie/graduateschool/course/psychology-ma

    The actual MA is research heavy (you will have one class of empirical psych - basically SPSS - and a separate module on research methods each semester) and the lecturer this year recommended:
    1. Howell, D. C. (2010). Statistical methods for psychology (7th ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.
    2. Smith, J. A. (2008). Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods (2nd ed.). London, UK: Sage
    3. Howitt, D., & Cramer, D. (2008). An introduction to statistics for psychology (4th ed.). Essex, UK: Pearson Education Limited.

    Other than that a basic working knowledge of the basics was handy - core intro. psych books. I chose to take quite a few of the optional modules (you can replace core modules if you've previously taken them). A lot of it was in the newer psych disciplines (employee relations, sport etc) and I enjoyed that. All new info. is article based rather than book based! Had I had to take more of the core options, cognitive psychology would have been the second mandatory key focus - again, the book recommended is:
    - Goldstein, E.B. (2011). Cognitive Psychology. Connecting Mind, Research, and Everyday Life Experiences. London, UK: Thompson Wadsworth.

    The other option is to contact Dr Eric Igou. He's a nice man (but busy) and would happily have a phone conversation about the requirements and skills needed for the course.

    Sorry I'm not much more help: I'm probably not a great example as I had studied a lot of psychology before this course. I wasn't overly impressed by the course but that was mainly as they had teething structural problems which were difficult to negotiate while working (as a mature student). TO be fair, its a new course in a newish psychology department. The quality of the research is there and there were opportunities created to take on voluntary research in connection with lectures etc which were great. Kind of one of those courses that you get out of it what you put in!


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