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Purchasing good gear for South America

  • 14-07-2011 3:13pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 783 learnerplates


    Where's the best place to buy lightweight quality gear for backpacking?


    Does not necessarily have to be from Ireland but that would help. I do know some people who maybe travelling to the US before we go, also someone coming back from Dubai.

    We're heading to Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina in Sept for 3 months, backpacking. I see temperatures range from 0 - 25C.

    sleeping bag, rain jacket, backpack, fleeces, towels, hiking pants.

    not looking for the most expensive stuff either. have about 200 euro to play with.
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Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 685 ✭✭✭ darrenh


    Aldi or Lidl are always good but not sure if they will have stuff in time. Be very careful what you buy, you'll be surprised what you wont use. In Bolivia or Peru if it is cold you can buy the local Llama wool products. I fit works for them....

    Dont over do it on the locals clothes though. Many backpackers do and have become the butt of many a joke. You'll see what I mean when you get there! Enjoy!


  • Registered Users Posts: 709 mac123


    darrenh wrote: »
    Aldi or Lidl are always good but not sure if they will have stuff in time. Be very careful what you buy, you'll be surprised what you wont use. In Bolivia or Peru if it is cold you can buy the local Llama wool products. I fit works for them....

    Dont over do it on the locals clothes though. Many backpackers do and have become the butt of many a joke. You'll see what I mean when you get there! Enjoy!

    did you bring a sleeping bag?


  • Moderators, Recreation & Hobbies Moderators Posts: 4,317 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dory


    For towel get a quick dry one. And no need for a sleeping bag. I bring a sleeping bag that I got in Tesco for 9 Euro. In fact, you can get quite a lot in Tesco.

    I got my fleece and jacket in Spain. I went mad and got a Columbia one and it stood to me on those cold nights. As for rain jacket - get one of those that fit into a bag. I can't remember where I got mine, think it was one of those sailing shops for about 20 Euro.


  • Registered Users Posts: 783 learnerplates


    Thanks for the responses.

    Yes we've picked up fleeces in Aldi over the past couple of months and I have plenty of sleeping bags but the 0 degrees at night is a bit of a worry.

    I guess the hostels are warmer than that and if we ended up camping with a tour we'd probably have stuff provided by them.

    Roll up rain jacket is what I had in mind, I have one but the rain resitance has worn off.

    Is there much rain in that part of the world September - December? the reports I've seen say not but I presume it changes from location to location, Bolivia rainforest to Argentinian Andes.


    Are there outdoor stores over there? I'd imagine so, Cuzco, La Paz etc.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,022 ✭✭✭ Meathlass


    I was in that part of the world around sept - march and didn't use a sleeping bag. Any camping/treking trips I did the gear was provided. I did bring my own pillow case for hostels which didn't weigh anything or take up much room. I brought a proper towel because I hate the quick dry ones.

    It's not that cold over there but but definately bring a cheap penneys rainjacket for chile. I picked up waterproof trousers for hiking in chile but that's the only 'gear' I bought over there. Most of the time a fleece at night will be warm enough. I know you say it'll be 0 degrees at night but that's outside and unless you're camping outside then layering will work fine. I'd some great nights in chile/argentina curled up next to the fire with a bottle of wine. There was also one hostel in Ushuaia in Argentina which had underfloor heating which was amazing!


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,471 sarkozy


    Haha, it's so funny the crayzies who walk around wearing all the hippy gear. Blummin' 'eck. Funny and annoying simultaneously.

    Honestly, OP, don't go overboard here. If you start your trip somewhere sensible like Buenos Aires or Lima, you can find an outdoors place for locals (not tourists) where you can get good gear for less. But do pick up some local stuff along the way as needs be, some does the job. But usually the stuff that goes under your clothes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 265 ✭✭ HankScorpio1985


    I agree with everyone else...the less you can bring the better. There's no point lugging around a sleeping back if you're not going to use it. The old time I needed one was on the Inca Trail and I rented one from the company. Top of the line it was. Just a few warm jumpers/jackets and a rain jacket, good runners/walking shoes and you should be grand. You can pick up gloves/hats over there off the locals. But don't get too much and end up looking like a douchebag.


  • Registered Users Posts: 6 ✭✭✭ amberhues


    Hi,
    If you're going up high altitude or very far south - its well worth bring a set of thermals. They'll take up very little room to pack and you might get glad of them as it can get pretty cold even in their summer. But yes - as others say there are plenty of outdoor shops over there so you can pick things up if you need. I camped a lot. Brought a 4 season sleeping bag which was a pain because of its size - but was still very glad I did bring it. Was toasty warm when others were wearing 4 layers of clothes in their 2 season and still shivering! If you decide not to bring a sleeping bag you might want to get one of those sleeping bag liners. Again they take up no room, and if you are using rented gear you have your own liner. Pack towels are worth it for saving space and weight. And a head torch is definitely a handy thing to bring..


  • Registered Users Posts: 783 learnerplates


    thanks all. bare essentials. I'm looking for a smaller rucksack now, 40 litre ish, to fit my lighter load.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,471 sarkozy


    Get a down sleeping bag - warmer and smaller. More expensive, but worth it. Just don't get it wet.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 9 ✭✭✭ Gone_Dutch


    No need for a sleeping bag, +1 for a liner. I always bring a cotton one and just rent a sleeping bag if I'm camping and it's going to be very cold. Also handy for hostels with dodgy bedding!

    If you're going to be doing a lot of trekking, I'd recommend investing in a good, breathable rain jacket, and maybe some lightweight fast-drying trekking pants. Keep an eye out in Aldi or Penneys for thermals, they often have them in. If you want to spend a bit more ice breakers are the business, and non-smelly. Great for multi-day treks!


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