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Drumcondra, Micra T test scores

  • 11-07-2011 11:16am
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 85 ✭✭✭ gerryandliza


    Hi, Really hoping that someone can help us out here. Our kids have just completed their first academic year in Ireland. We received our daughters report but cant understand what the Micra t and drumcondra maths and verbal reasoning test scores mean. Can anyone tell us what would be deemed to be a good/average score for these tests. Thanks in advance


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,674 ✭✭✭ thesimpsons


    results may have been given to you in one of two formats. Either a STen score marked from 1 to 10 or as a percentile. A STen score of 5 would be considered average, lower than 3 could means the child would qualify for learning support resourse hours next September. A score of 7 would be good and 9/10 would be excellent.

    If expressed as a percentile you could be given a score of 70%. This means that the child scored better than 70% of children in Ireland of same age in the same class level.

    http://www.ncca.ie/

    gives you more information (sorry can't seem to paste link to exact page you require but its under the heading of Primary School and then Standardised Testi

    The school shouldn't have just given results on their own without the explanation sheet. Hope this helps


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    The score is not 70 %, it means your child has, as the Simpsons said,scored as well or better than 70% of the population. Children on the 10th percentile or lower (or sten 3) are usually offered learning support.


  • Registered Users Posts: 35 premiertipp


    Children who score on or under the 12th percentile are entitled to learning support - most schools will offer support to children with scores of 14 to 16 or under. With new cutbacks though i'm not sure if this will change


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Children under 10th percentile are usually offered support as I already stated, but the test result is not taken in isolation, so the opinion of the class teacher is also taken into account.An excellent reader might have been sick and socred badly for example.


  • Registered Users Posts: 183 ✭✭ aisher


    My kids scored 3 in their Maths this year and they were not offered any support - I did ask and was told they were not weak enough - this was not an isolated result as they scored much the same last year. They are now in 5th class and I am seriously worried how they will catch up :(


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  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Sten 3 is goes up to the 14/15th percentile and if the school has many children on the tenth percentile they will not be able to offer support to anyone above the 10th.

    Aisher, we use New Wave Mental maths in learning support ,I would suggest it to you to help your pair catch up(5th class one.) Sadly, stories like yours are going to be more and more common. There's talk of more and more cuts to special ed. so the situation is not going to improve any time soon.


  • Registered Users Posts: 183 ✭✭ aisher


    Sten 3 is goes up to the 14/15th percentile and if the school has many children on the tenth percentile they will not be able to offer support to anyone above the 10th.

    Aisher, we use New Wave Mental maths in learning support ,I would suggest it to you to help your pair catch up(5th class one.) Sadly, stories like yours are going to be more and more common. There's talk of more and more cuts to special ed. so the situation is not going to improve any time soon.

    Thanks for the heads up on the book :) I enrolled my kids on an online maths programme IXL that covers the 5th class syllabus. I am a little shocked at the simple errors they are making but am going to work with them for one half hour session each evening - more if they will co-operate. I am unhappy with the school as they are in a group of 30 kids who all scored 1 - 3 in the Sten and they have two teachers - sounds great until you realise they are each doing half the lesson rather then withdrawing small groups :confused: If I had the money I would love to pay for a 'grind' which I know is crazy when they are only in Primary school but thats the level of worry I am at now :(


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    I'm totally against grinds for primary kids. I think you are taking the right approach,correcting the simple errors. The DES is pushing for support teachers to go into mainstream classes, but it really needs a lot of consideration and planning for this to work well.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,170 ✭✭✭ wildlifeboy


    My daughter got 9/10 on both and the highest in her class...so proud. her teacher says she is learning years ahead of her class and that the normal work just doesnt interest her. obviously i am happy but i want her to be stimulated. any ideas?


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    Is it possible that she is exceptionally able?What age is she ?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,170 ✭✭✭ wildlifeboy


    She is 8.5 in 3rd class. I wonder if there is any tests we could have her take to get another idea of her abilities. or is there somewhere we could take her to see.


  • Registered Users Posts: 54 ✭✭✭ molly111


    My son is 8 and is in 2nd class he got 10 in both his tests at the end of first class.

    I heard about these courses they do in UCC (and other colleges around the country) called CTYI. We applied and he did an aptitude test and was accepted. He goes each Saturday and loves it - he is doing Chemistry.

    Last year's teacher was very into the idea of pushing my son and gave him homework from 2nd class but his current teacher doesn't really believe in pushing him.

    I don't want to push him and put him off the whole school thing but I do want him to make the most of his abilities.


  • Moderators, Education Moderators, Regional South East Moderators Posts: 12,321 Mod ✭✭✭✭ byhookorbycrook


    An psycho-educational assessment will cost in the region of €600. We suggests to parents that they get their child to do the assessment test at CTYI which costs €45 and will be a good indicator as to whether the child is exceptionally able.Children with say,dyslexia,or other special educational needs may not perform well in tests and yet may also be exceptionally able too.If a child has an objective assessment of high ability ,it might be easier to approach the school.Sadly EA children are not entitled to any extra support as other children are,under DES rules (Don't start me!!)Some schools do make provision, but due to lack of resources,this is not as comprehensive as it should be.Take a look at giftedkids.ie


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