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Irish studies - a subject for teaching??

  • 14-06-2011 10:10pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    My youngster has applied for Irish Studies and is now wondering if they'll be able to teach Irish with it in future. I have my doubts, but maybe someone here can tell me for sure?

    Thanks

    JC


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 3,235 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    It's very difficult to attempt a rational answer to this without knowing what college the course is in and being able to have a look at the content. The Teaching Council website gives some information (see the link) on the requirements for teaching subjects but it's fairly vague and merely send one back to wondering what the content of the Irish Studies course is.

    'Irish Studies' sounds very broad and could include just a relative smattering of Irish language and Irish language literature. History and Anglo-Irish literature (English language literature by Irish writers) could be just as relevant to the course.

    My instinct - without any knowledge of the specifics of the course - would be that it would be insufficient as you are required to spend time in the Gaeltacht during the course of an Irish degree which is unlikely to be catered for to a sufficient level in such a general course as 'Irish Studies' sounds.
    http://www.teachingcouncil.ie/_fileupload/TC_ProcDocs/General_And_Special_Requirements_19282059.doc


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 22 ✭✭✭ Athene


    My youngster has applied for Irish Studies and is now wondering if they'll be able to teach Irish with it in future. I have my doubts, but maybe someone here can tell me for sure?

    Thanks

    JC

    Surely your child can ask the university in question what career paths such a Degree may lead to?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,235 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    Athene wrote: »

    Surely your child can ask the university in question what career paths such a Degree may lead to?



    I would be wary of relying on this information from the university. The Teaching Council is the only arbiter of the eligibility of qualifications for teaching.


  • Registered Users Posts: 15,244 ✭✭✭✭ rainbowtrout


    My youngster has applied for Irish Studies and is now wondering if they'll be able to teach Irish with it in future. I have my doubts, but maybe someone here can tell me for sure?

    Thanks

    JC

    This is the Teaching Council list of degrees that are recognised for teaching. Degrees are added from time to time and graduates can ask for their degree to be assessed (a whole other can of worms).


    http://www.teachingcouncil.ie/_fileupload/Image/Autoquals_updated_29th_March_2011_84638479.pdf

    There are two degrees on it called Irish Studies

    Bachelor of Arts (Irish Studies) from UL which qualifies a person to teach Irish
    assuming they go on to do the PGDE

    and Bachelor of Arts in Irish Studies and Religious Studies in Mater Dei which qualifies a person to teach English and Religion.

    Is it one of those degrees? If it's the first one he/she should be fine.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,861 ✭✭✭ JuliusCaesar


    Thank you so much for your answers.

    No, it's Irish Studies in Trinity.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 3,235 ✭✭✭ Rosita


    Thank you so much for your answers.

    No, it's Irish Studies in Trinity.


    Ii just had a look at that course and there certainly is good Irish language content. If the student took the extra options in the Irish language they certainly should be able to achieve a third of their degree as credits in the Irish language which tends to be the rule of thumb for teaching. However, I would be concerned about the amount of spoken Irish classes specified and not sure if there is Gaeltacht attendance involved. The latter certainly is not specified. It would certainly be worth running it by the Teaching Council* if possible or asking the college if this has been done at any stage. That it's not currently on the Teaching Council list does not necessarily mean that it was refused recognition but it might mean that!

    * From what I have heard of this organisation they have in the past refused to assess qualifications except retrospectively, so they seem to want to encourage people to waste their time doing courses before dismissing them as unsuitable for teaching.


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