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Hip Replacement Resurfacing, Surgery and Running

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  • 23-11-2010 3:35pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭


    Hi,

    Has anybody on here had a hip replacement or resurfacing done ?

    If yes I'd be keen to find out how running was afterwards, flexibility etc ?

    And some information about who did it and where ?

    Thanks


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 996 ✭✭✭mitresize5


    cant speak from experince (thankfully) but there is a life long member of Limerick Tri Club whos had a hip replacement and he's still well up the field in Olympic distrance tri's. He's mid 50's and still flying it

    Doesnt answer any of your specific questions but it shuld give you some encouragement for the future


  • Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 20,364 Mod ✭✭✭✭RacoonQueen


    Hip surgery generally has a high success rate, you can usually weightbear from day one post op. and start getting back to normal activities after about 6 weeks.

    THIS will give you some good information about the procedure.

    No idea where's a good place to get it done in Ireland though. I assume Santry would be the place to go.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    Hip surgery generally has a high success rate, you can usually weightbear from day one post op. and start getting back to normal activities after about 6 weeks.

    THIS will give you some good information about the procedure.

    No idea where's a good place to get it done in Ireland though. I assume Santry would be the place to go.

    Thanks, I've read quite a few online articles but this is certainly one of the better and clearer ones.


  • Registered Users Posts: 256 ✭✭MacSwifty


    Tadgh O'Sullivan in the Whitfield Clinic in Waterford is a World leader in this area, he was one of the pioneers of the technical development in this area both from a design and implementation point of view.

    http://www.whitfieldclinic.ie/directory.asp

    He is a sports Dr and I don't think he is too expensive - but they come from far and near to see him, including the premiership


  • Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 32 Rigsy


    Bump

    Anyone be able to give some info on this please?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    Rigsy wrote: »
    Bump

    Anyone be able to give some info on this please?

    What do you want to know ?


  • Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 32 Rigsy


    Basically what you were asking in the original post.
    Did you get it done by any chance?


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    Rigsy wrote: »
    Basically what you were asking in the original post.
    Did you get it done by any chance?

    I did, in Whitfield. Very successful and should have done it a couple of years previously. Much more flexibility than before (though not quite the same as the other side).

    Did a bit of running after for a bit (limp gone) and a couple of short distance triathlons/advrace but made a decision to stop as was worried about longevity and wasn't seeing much improvement on low mileage (limited myself to 5K a week and mostly on a treadmill).

    Cycling a different story, better biomechanics meant a more efficient pedalling stroke when in a aero position (tucked down) and I saw immediate improvement. Can also train as much and as hard as anybody else and have been racing with it the last couple of years.

    Hope this helps.


  • Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 32 Rigsy


    Was it the resurfacing you got done?

    Also when you say you stopped running because of your worry about longevity
    was that a personal choice or was there a suggestion it wouldn't last if you kept running?

    Also when you say that you weren't seeing much improvement, how was the pace compared to pre-op?

    Thanks for getting back to me. Much appreciated


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    Rigsy wrote: »
    Was it the resurfacing you got done?

    Also when you say you stopped running because of your worry about longevity
    was that a personal choice or was there a suggestion it wouldn't last if you kept running?

    Also when you say that you weren't seeing much improvement, how was the pace compared to pre-op?

    Thanks for getting back to me. Much appreciated

    No it was what would be termed a full replacement. Wouldn't get too hung up with the difference between full and resurfacing, they are justs words bandied about from what I see... there seems to be several different procedures and a resurfacing is not quite what the word suggests. Most important is to get somebody who will do a good job.

    It was a personal choice to stop running, as far as I can tell no consultant will tell you running is fine so it is something that you decide to do on your own bat. Pace was similar to preop.

    You can certainly run after a replacement but the big question is by much how it is shortening the life of the insert and I'd be surprised if any consultant will give you an answer on that.


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  • Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 32 Rigsy


    Great to see you're op has been successful. From the reading I've done on the subject there is a difference between the two. I'm no expert but it seems that resurfacing doesn't remove the head of the bone like a replacement. It means that the hip can be later revised to a total replacement. If done right, a patient can remain active as before.

    However it seems that it's not as straightforward an op as the total one and a lot depends on the skill of the surgeon to get it right.

    As you will know, there's a lot of food for thought there. I had thought I might be able to last a few more years before an op but unfortunately I think it's coming sooner rather than later. Thanks again for your help.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    Rigsy wrote: »
    Great to see you're op has been successful. From the reading I've done on the subject there is a difference between the two. I'm no expert but it seems that resurfacing doesn't remove the head of the bone like a replacement. It means that the hip can be later revised to a total replacement. If done right, a patient can remain active as before.

    However it seems that it's not as straightforward an op as the total one and a lot depends on the skill of the surgeon to get it right.

    As you will know, there's a lot of food for thought there. I had thought I might be able to last a few more years before an op but unfortunately I think it's coming sooner rather than later. Thanks again for your help.

    I held out to the last too and it was only after getting it done I realised how much discomfort I had been in and how decapitating it was. It will take years off your life .... and of course I don't mean in the living shorter way :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 17 UsainBolt100


    Rigsy wrote: »
    Great to see you're op has been successful. From the reading I've done on the subject there is a difference between the two. I'm no expert but it seems that resurfacing doesn't remove the head of the bone like a replacement. It means that the hip can be later revised to a total replacement. If done right, a patient can remain active as before.

    However it seems that it's not as straightforward an op as the total one and a lot depends on the skill of the surgeon to get it right.

    As you will know, there's a lot of food for thought there. I had thought I might be able to last a few more years before an op but unfortunately I think it's coming sooner rather than later. Thanks again for your help.

    Hi rigsy, I hope you are keeping well.

    Having read through all above post etc just wondering if you had surgery on your hip and if so what type did you go ahead with? how have you been since?

    Did you manage to get back into some kind of sport? tks in advance for any feedback


  • Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 32 Rigsy


    I'm booked in for full replacement in September!

    I got into cycling for a while and did a few sportives but didn't get the same buzz as the running to be honest. Still did a little bit of running where I'd run
    small milage for a couple of months, realise it was hurting too much, stop, rest
    up for a couple of months before having selective amnesia and decide I'd start again, repeat!


    Like Harringtonp, I just felt it was time to get it done as I felt the whole thing was taking over my life, I couldn't do anything anyway and whatever I could do post op would be a bonus. Booked in through the Santry Sports Clinic and fully intend to get back running post op. To what extent remains to be seen.

    Looking forward and dreading it in equal measures but finally time to take my life back.

    Are you in a similar boat?


  • Registered Users Posts: 17 UsainBolt100


    Rigsy wrote: »
    I'm booked in for full replacement in September!

    I got into cycling for a while and did a few sportives but didn't get the same buzz as the running to be honest. Still did a little bit of running where I'd run
    small milage for a couple of months, realise it was hurting too much, stop, rest
    up for a couple of months before having selective amnesia and decide I'd start again, repeat!


    Like Harringtonp, I just felt it was time to get it done as I felt the whole thing was taking over my life, I couldn't do anything anyway and whatever I could do post op would be a bonus. Booked in through the Santry Sports Clinic and fully intend to get back running post op. To what extent remains to be seen.

    Looking forward and dreading it in equal measures but finally time to take my life back.

    Are you in a similar boat?

    Rigsy thanks for the reply. Ye similar boat however on both sides. Not sure when.. It's a case of managing it for the moment etc. I'm in my early 30's so came as quiet the shock! do you mind me asking what age you are?

    It's positive to hear you say you hope to return to running..just even the fact that its still possible to actually run - i know some people limit running for various reasons. I don't know anyone personally so has had this done so its reassuring to hear that there is (hopefully) that level of functionality. Any other reassuring info would be very welcome!!

    What surgeon have you chosen do you mind me asking?


  • Registered Users Posts: 397 ✭✭carter10


    http://hiprunner.com may be of interest to those contemplating running after a hip replacement


  • Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 32 Rigsy


    I was just about to post that same link! Great site.

    (PMd you Usain)


  • Registered Users Posts: 147 ✭✭conor052001


    Rigsy wrote: »
    I was just about to post that same link! Great site.

    (PMd you Usain)

    Hi Rigsy, am in a similar position to Usain in my early 30s and require both hips replaced. Was wondering how it all went since then, and also about how you chose your surgeon (I too intend on getting it done in Santry probably) Thanks.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,988 ✭✭✭opus


    carter10 wrote: »
    http://hiprunner.com may be of interest to those contemplating running after a hip replacement

    Thanks for that, a friend of mine had to have a hip replaced last year & always had a hankering to do a marathon so might get some useful info there.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2 frinomax


    I did, in Whitfield. Very successful and should have done it a couple of years previously. Much more flexibility than before (though not quite the same as the other side).

    Did a bit of running after for a bit (limp gone) and a couple of short distance triathlons/advrace but made a decision to stop as was worried about longevity and wasn't seeing much improvement on low mileage (limited myself to 5K a week and mostly on a treadmill).

    Cycling a different story, better biomechanics meant a more efficient pedalling stroke when in a aero position (tucked down) and I saw immediate improvement. Can also train as much and as hard as anybody else and have been racing with it the last couple of years.

    Hope this helps.
    Hello,

    How is you hip after 8 years? Did you have metallosis issues?

    Thanks,
    Max


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  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    frinomax wrote: »
    Hello,

    How is you hip after 8 years? Did you have metallosis issues?

    Thanks,
    Max

    Still perfect and going on 10 years this September. Had to look up metallosis but no, nothing that I'm aware of. It is a ceramic hip replacement I got.


  • Registered Users Posts: 163 ✭✭xabi_a


    Great to hear you're good after 8 years! I'm considering this op now... I do a bit of low level running (maybe just the odd parkrun), some cycling and some tennis (mostly just doubles). I'm 59, and hoping to be able to keep all that up after the op. I'm limping a lot at the moment, and my movement is so restricted I find it hard just to get my leg over the bike crossbar. So I think it's probably time.

    One other thing is do is ski, and I do black slopes. I think I might need to ease off that, it puts a lot of pressure on the hips and just 2 weeks ago it aggravated my bad hip a lot.



  • Registered Users Posts: 2,563 ✭✭✭harringtonp


    Once done, I doubt if you'll have a problem skiing. Not long back from a week of it in the Dolomites, only issue I had after the first long day (in a few years) was the thighs. No hip problems



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