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Last surviving human structure?

  • 26-09-2010 7:12pm
    #1
    Closed Accounts Posts: 145 ✭✭ h8scobes


    hi i watched a documentary last nite clld life after humans and am wondering if humans just disapeared 2moro what human structure would last longest and for how long? in the doc it said mount rushmore could last thousands of years(think it was like half a million)


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,361 mgmt


    Probably some reinforced concrete military installation. Going by what the Romans built, concrete will last for a long long time.


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,093 ✭✭✭ hi5


    The Pyramids,how long would it take sand to erode them?


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,278 ✭✭✭ dubhthach


    mgmt wrote: »
    Probably some reinforced concrete military installation. Going by what the Romans built, concrete will last for a long long time.

    One reason why the romans buildings survive is they don't have any reinforced steel (rebar) in them. They are pure concrete. Steel when it eventually rusts expands. This puts pressure on concrete and eventually will lead to failure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 37,534 ✭✭✭✭ the_syco


    I'm thinking castles, that haven't been blown apart yet.


  • Moderators, Music Moderators Posts: 2,141 Mod ✭✭✭✭ Oink


    I read a really good article a while back in New Scientist, the theory was that the last (man-built) thing to crumble into dust would not be on earth. It will be some deep-space probe. I think it was Galileo.
    Apparently it will still be there for a loooong time after everything else is gone.

    EDIT - I don't know if that would count as a structure but it would still outlast anything else. So there.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 5,278 ✭✭✭ dowlingm


    Pioneer 10 so probably (the earlier missions were within the solar system so will probably be written off by collisions or solar explosion first) - although I thought metal did lose atoms in a vacuum over time so maybe not.


  • Registered Users Posts: 969 ✭✭✭ murrayp4


    Oink wrote: »
    I read a really good article a while back in New Scientist, the theory was that the last (man-built) thing to crumble into dust would not be on earth. It will be some deep-space probe. I think it was Galileo.
    Apparently it will still be there for a loooong time after everything else is gone.

    EDIT - I don't know if that would count as a structure but it would still outlast anything else. So there.

    Would that not have been the Voyager probe?


  • Registered Users Posts: 260 ✭✭ Poster King


    Places like NORAD would last a pretty long time due to being largely protected from natural weathering processes.


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,630 Plowman


    This post has been deleted.


  • Registered Users Posts: 739 onlyrocknroll


    I'd say Joan Rivers face, that'll never bio-degrade.


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  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,044 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    Plowman wrote: »
    This post has been deleted.

    Looked like a hill before the Victorians got to it and took a wild guess at what it looked like. And that white front wall is stuck to reinforced concrete (!!!!!) so would spall and collapse within a few decades if water got in to it.

    The underground NORAD stuff would flood soon enough without human intervention.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,888 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    Plowman wrote: »
    This post has been deleted.
    No chance, Newgrange was already "lost" once. It was rediscovered and excavated and subsequently seriously renovated. The stones areound the face for example had all fallen down. What you see today is largely a work of the 1960's.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 11,001 ✭✭✭✭ opinion guy


    MYOB wrote: »
    Looked like a hill before the Victorians got to it and took a wild guess at what it looked like. And that white front wall is stuck to reinforced concrete (!!!!!) so would spall and collapse within a few decades if water got in to it.

    The underground NORAD stuff would flood soon enough without human intervention.

    The Victorians found Newgrange ? I don't think so.


  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Motoring & Transport Moderators, Society & Culture Moderators Posts: 61,044 Mod ✭✭✭✭ L1011


    The Victorians found Newgrange ? I don't think so.

    No, but it was them that made an arse out of how it looked by taking a random decision as to what would look pretty.

    Newgrange did NOT look like it does now prior to the 1890s, if it ever did.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 145 ✭✭ h8scobes


    on the show it said that the biggest pyramids would still be there as well in 500 thousand yrs, but rly eroded


  • Registered Users Posts: 2,208 ✭✭✭ Mrmoe


    I would say the Suez canal would last a very long time if that can be classed as a structure.


  • Registered Users Posts: 18,888 ✭✭✭✭ murphaph


    Mrmoe wrote: »
    I would say the Suez canal would last a very long time if that can be classed as a structure.
    I'd say most canals would be "early victims" to mother nature tbh.


  • Registered Users Posts: 8,781 ✭✭✭ Carawaystick


    dubhthach wrote: »
    One reason why the romans buildings survive is they don't have any reinforced steel (rebar) in them. They are pure concrete. Steel when it eventually rusts expands. This puts pressure on concrete and eventually will lead to failure.
    I thought most old roman structures are stone- and held with mortar made of pozzolanic cement, which is airtight and still not gone off in the centre, so if the outside of the mortar spalls, the next bit inside will cure.


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