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Tyrannosaurus Redux: T. Rex Was More Than Just a Large Carnivore at Top of Food Chain

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  • Just trying to establish how many tyrannosaur genera are known (a brief census if you will).

    Proceratosaurus - mid Jurassic - UK
    Iliosuchus? - mid Jurassic -UK
    Kileskus - mid Jurassic -Russia
    Guanlong - late Jurassic - China
    Aviatyrannis - late Jurassic - Portugal
    Coelurus? - late Jurassic - North America
    Tanycolagreus? - late Jurassic - North America
    Stokesosaurus - late Jurassic - North America/UK
    Dilong - early Cretaceous - China
    Xiongguanlong - early Cretaceous - China
    Sinotyrannus - early Cretaceous - China
    Raptorex - early Creataceous - China
    Eotyrannus - early Cretaceous - UK
    Bagaraatan? - late Creataceous - Mongolia
    Labocania? - late Cretaceous - Mexico
    Dryptosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America
    Appalachiosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America
    Alectrosaurus - late Cretaceous - Mongolia
    Bistahieversor - late Cretaceous - North America
    Daspletosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America
    Gorgosaurus* - late cretaceous - North America
    Albertosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America
    Alioramus - late Cretaceous - Asia
    Tarbosaurus - late Cretaceous - Asia
    Nanotyrannus* - late Creataceous - North America
    Tyrannosaurus - late creataceous - North America

    ? indicate possible tyrannosaurs
    * indicate heavily disputed genera

    Wow, I had no idea there were so many. I'll have to do some more research to get myself up to date.
    For the record, I have not included tyrannosaurs identified exclusively by tooth frgaments from areas where other more defined tyrannosaurs lived, as these are almost certainly nomen dubium.




  • Just trying to establish how many tyrannosaur genera are known (a brief census if you will).

    Proceratosaurus - mid Jurassic - UK - 10 ft
    Iliosuchus? - mid Jurassic -UK - 5 ft
    Kileskus - mid Jurassic -Russia - 10 ft
    Guanlong - late Jurassic - China - 10 ft
    Aviatyrannis - late Jurassic - Portugal - 9 ft
    Coelurus? - late Jurassic - North America - 8 ft
    Tanycolagreus? - late Jurassic - North America - 13 ft
    Stokesosaurus - late Jurassic - North America/UK - 12 ft
    Dilong - early Cretaceous - China - 5 ft
    Xiongguanlong - early Cretaceous - China - 10 ft
    Sinotyrannus - early Cretaceous - China - 33 ft
    Raptorex - early Creataceous - China - 10 ft
    Not Yet Named - early Cretaceous - Australia -10 ft
    Eotyrannus - early Cretaceous - UK - 13 ft
    Bagaraatan? - late Creataceous - Mongolia - 12 ft
    Labocania? - late Cretaceous - Mexico - 20 ft
    Dryptosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America - 20 ft
    Appalachiosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America - 24 ft
    Alectrosaurus - late Cretaceous - Mongolia - 17 ft
    Bistahieversor - late Cretaceous - North America - 30 ft
    Daspletosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America - 30 ft
    Gorgosaurus* - late Cretaceous - North America - 30 ft
    Albertosaurus - late Cretaceous - North America - 26 ft
    Alioramus - late Cretaceous - Asia - 18 ft
    Tarbosaurus - late Cretaceous - Asia - 40 ft
    Nanotyrannus* - late Creataceous - North America -17 ft
    Tyrannosaurus - late creataceous - North America - 42 ft

    ? indicate possible tyrannosaurs
    * indicate heavily disputed genera

    Wow, I had no idea there were so many. I'll have to do some more research to get myself up to date.
    For the record, I have not included tyrannosaurs identified exclusively by tooth frgaments from areas where other more defined tyrannosaurs lived, as these are almost certainly nomen dubium.




  • Just edited in the approximate lenghts (in feet) of the various tyrannosaurs.




  • Scientific American have a rather good slideshow of lesser known tyrannosaurs.


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