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How risky is "Garlon"?

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  • 29-07-2010 1:51pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 389 ✭✭


    Hi,
    Our landlord hired a contractor to cleanup the garden, and he's planning to use a herbicide called "Garlon", plus another one he says it's "safer", to kill the blackberries. I personally dislike poisons and, since my wife is now pregnant, I'd like to know if these poisons are dangerous to her (other than to our pets). My main concern regards the vegetables, which are close to the shrubs where the blackberries have roots. At the moment I stopped the gardener until I find more information (of course, NOT from the producers of the poison, as they have all the interests in declaring it safe). Thanks for all your answers.
    Tagged:


Comments

  • Moderators, Business & Finance Moderators, Regional South Moderators Posts: 6,854 Mod ✭✭✭✭mp22


    This is probably what they will use
    http://www.dhm.ie/products/herb/garlon2.pdf


  • Registered Users Posts: 389 ✭✭daigo75


    Thanks. It seems I have good reasons for not wanting it sprayed close to my other berries and vegetables, especially since we are in harvesting season. I'll "kindly" ask the gardener not to use it, I prefer to prune the blackberries myself.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,871 ✭✭✭Corsendonk


    daigo75 wrote: »
    Hi,
    My main concern regards the vegetables, which are close to the shrubs where the blackberries have roots. At the moment I stopped the gardener until I find more information (of course, NOT from the producers of the poison, as they have all the interests in declaring it safe). Thanks for all your answers.

    A popular chemical for clearing pasture land and golf courses. True the producer has an interest in declaring it safe, they also have an interest in not getting sued or going to jail so you will find that they have to carry out extensive testing for a period of years before release on to the market. All testing information is then submitted before a license is granted. Remember these chemicals are designed for the food industry were you want to increase your yields and not kill the consumer. More info about the product below.


    http://www.voluntaryinitiative.org.uk/_Attachments/resources/659_s4.pdf

    I assume that your landlord has hired a gardener trained in the application and mixing of pesticides. As no matter how safe the product is, it relies on the correct mix rate to be used.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,871 ✭✭✭Corsendonk


    Save some of the prunning after you harvest the blackberries, you might as well make use of them.


  • Registered Users Posts: 389 ✭✭daigo75


    Corsendonk wrote: »
    A popular chemical for clearing pasture land and golf courses. True the producer has an interest in declaring it safe, they also have an interest in not getting sued or going to jail so you will find that they have to carry out extensive testing for a period of years before release on to the market.

    I assume that your landlord has hired a gardener trained in the application and mixing of pesticides. As no matter how safe the product is, it relies on the correct mix rate to be used.

    Thanks Corsendonk. I'll still talk to the gardener and ask him, if he really has to use it, to wait until this autumn, when I'll be done harvesting my vegetables (and the blackberries too). As "safe" as the poison could be, it's still a poison, and my wife and baby's safety is more important than removing some plants. I appreciate that the stuff has been tested, but I don't want to take even the slightest risk.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 389 ✭✭daigo75


    Corsendonk wrote: »
    Save some of the prunning after you harvest the blackberries, you might as well make use of them.

    Thanks for the hint, but what use do you suggest? :)


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Arts Moderators, Sports Moderators Posts: 49,276 CMod ✭✭✭✭magicbastarder


    Corsendonk wrote: »
    I assume that your landlord has hired a gardener trained in the application and mixing of pesticides.
    i wish i had as much faith...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 3,871 ✭✭✭Corsendonk


    Excellent jam or summer fruit pudding, plenty of recipes online. If you cut it right back to the base it will grow back next year and should give you a heavier crop of blackberries.

    I think the great unknown factor of pesticides scares people off as they havent had much contact with them. But the sad fact is that the motor car has a higher risk yet people are happy to take that risk. Risk perception.


  • Registered Users Posts: 5,834 ✭✭✭Sonnenblumen


    daigo75 wrote: »
    Hi,
    Our landlord hired a contractor to cleanup the garden, and he's planning to use a herbicide called "Garlon", plus another one he says it's "safer", to kill the blackberries. I personally dislike poisons and, since my wife is now pregnant, I'd like to know if these poisons are dangerous to her (other than to our pets). My main concern regards the vegetables, which are close to the shrubs where the blackberries have roots. At the moment I stopped the gardener until I find more information (of course, NOT from the producers of the poison, as they have all the interests in declaring it safe). Thanks for all your answers.

    Might have been more prudent to keep the fruit bushes under control? BTW Salt and Vinegar (also used as 'herbicides' ) would be considered 'safe'.

    It is never a good idea to spray where there is a risk of damage to nearby plants etc by drift.


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,939 ✭✭✭goat2


    daigo75 wrote: »
    Hi,
    Our landlord hired a contractor to cleanup the garden, and he's planning to use a herbicide called "Garlon", plus another one he says it's "safer", to kill the blackberries. I personally dislike poisons and, since my wife is now pregnant, I'd like to know if these poisons are dangerous to her (other than to our pets). My main concern regards the vegetables, which are close to the shrubs where the blackberries have roots. At the moment I stopped the gardener until I find more information (of course, NOT from the producers of the poison, as they have all the interests in declaring it safe). Thanks for all your answers.

    i would offer to clear whatever he had this poison for, it is easy to shear back briars and pull a few weeds, until your wife has had your baby, to be on the safe side, as for the veg, i would be afraid of drift spray, it is easy hire one of those petrol operated clipperes to cut back stuff, you would get a lot done in a few hours, also if these things were cut down to ground kevel and then brush a strong mixture of the killer it would also do the job


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  • Registered Users Posts: 389 ✭✭daigo75


    Thanks to all. At the end we agreed that the gardener will be using the poison only on the outermost area, outside of our garden, to prevent blackberries from crawling between the conifers. Our garden, grass and vegetables are safe, I'm much happier now. :)


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