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what age to start primary school?

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  • 12-07-2010 2:03pm
    #1
    Registered Users Posts: 242 ✭✭


    Please move this if it's posted to the wrong place...

    My son was born in June 2007. I'm trying to weigh up the pros and cons of when to enroll him in primary school.

    Would September 2010 or September 2011 be preferable? He will be 4yrs and 2 months and 5 yrs and 2 months respectively.

    If I could handle the costs for an additional year in creche, would he benifit greatly from being that bit older when he starts school?

    Thanks.


Comments

  • Registered Users Posts: 1,724 ✭✭✭BoozyBabe


    Am I missing something?
    If born in June 2007, wouldn't he have just turned 3 this year?
    & therefore just over 3 when Sept come around?
    Or did you mean to ask about Sept 2011 & 2012?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 57 ✭✭celtanu


    justo wrote: »
    Please move this if it's posted to the wrong place...

    My son was born in June 2007. I'm trying to weigh up the pros and cons of when to enroll him in primary school.

    Would September 2010 or September 2011 be preferable? He will be 4yrs and 2 months and 5 yrs and 2 months respectively.

    If I could handle the costs for an additional year in creche, would he benifit greatly from being that bit older when he starts school?

    Thanks.

    Generally, older is better, especially for boys. BUT if he is well advanced, and 'ready-to-go', holding him back in a creche will only frustrate his development. Either way, by the simple virtue that you are thinking about this, means that he'll probably do well either way, so don't worry. All the best


  • Registered Users Posts: 242 ✭✭justo


    BoozyBabe wrote: »
    Am I missing something?
    If born in June 2007, wouldn't he have just turned 3 this year?
    & therefore just over 3 when Sept come around?
    Or did you mean to ask about Sept 2011 & 2012?


    sorry. you are correct. I'm trying to decide on 2011 or 2012.

    cheers


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,170 ✭✭✭E.T.


    I've been teaching infants for nearly ten years, and from my experience I wouldn't start your son at 4 years and 2 months unless he's exceptionally socially mature. I've had very bright kids who started when they were very young, and they've really struggled to settle in because the majority of the other kids were older and had a bit more concentration and maturity. Intelligence will keep a child above water but it can take a younger child so much more effort to fit into the class routine that they just don't enjoy school as much as the others.

    At this age a few months makes an unbelievable difference - it's hard to understand from an adult perspective but being a few months older/younger can be the difference between settling in easily and struggling to settle down for the year. From any child I've experienced who has had trouble settling in, the end of April seems to be a cut off point - ie if they're only turning 5 after this point, they tend to find it hard to keep up socially, and this often gets more obvious by Senior Infants.

    You also have to think long-term. If your son starts at 4 years and 2 months and doesn't do (or have the option to do) Transition Year, then he'll only be 16 doing his Leaving Cert, and 17 going to college. I lived with a girl in college who was only 17, while the rest of us were 18 going on 19. She wasn't able to get into a lot of pubs and social events that most students were going to.

    There are loads of threads on rollercoaster.ie about this topic if you want to check out other peoples' views.


  • Registered Users Posts: 242 ✭✭justo


    E.T. wrote: »
    I've been teaching infants for nearly ten years, and from my experience I wouldn't start your son at 4 years and 2 months unless he's exceptionally socially mature. I've had very bright kids who started when they were very young, and they've really struggled to settle in because the majority of the other kids were older and had a bit more concentration and maturity. Intelligence will keep a child above water but it can take a younger child so much more effort to fit into the class routine that they just don't enjoy school as much as the others.

    At this age a few months makes an unbelievable difference - it's hard to understand from an adult perspective but being a few months older/younger can be the difference between settling in easily and struggling to settle down for the year. From any child I've experienced who has had trouble settling in, the end of April seems to be a cut off point - ie if they're only turning 5 after this point, they tend to find it hard to keep up socially, and this often gets more obvious by Senior Infants.

    You also have to think long-term. If your son starts at 4 years and 2 months and doesn't do (or have the option to do) Transition Year, then he'll only be 16 doing his Leaving Cert, and 17 going to college. I lived with a girl in college who was only 17, while the rest of us were 18 going on 19. She wasn't able to get into a lot of pubs and social events that most students were going to.

    There are loads of threads on rollercoaster.ie about this topic if you want to check out other peoples' views.


    Thanks for your advice on this - I value your input and it is very informative. I think I am thinking of the 5 yr option to give him the best chance.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 57 ✭✭celtanu


    E.T. wrote: »
    I've been teaching infants for nearly ten years, and from my experience I wouldn't start your son at 4 years and 2 months unless he's exceptionally socially mature. I've had very bright kids who started when they were very young, and they've really struggled to settle in because the majority of the other kids were older and had a bit more concentration and maturity. Intelligence will keep a child above water but it can take a younger child so much more effort to fit into the class routine that they just don't enjoy school as much as the others.

    At this age a few months makes an unbelievable difference - it's hard to understand from an adult perspective but being a few months older/younger can be the difference between settling in easily and struggling to settle down for the year. From any child I've experienced who has had trouble settling in, the end of April seems to be a cut off point - ie if they're only turning 5 after this point, they tend to find it hard to keep up socially, and this often gets more obvious by Senior Infants.

    You also have to think long-term. If your son starts at 4 years and 2 months and doesn't do (or have the option to do) Transition Year, then he'll only be 16 doing his Leaving Cert, and 17 going to college. I lived with a girl in college who was only 17, while the rest of us were 18 going on 19. She wasn't able to get into a lot of pubs and social events that most students were going to.

    There are loads of threads on rollercoaster.ie about this topic if you want to check out other peoples' views.

    Sounds reasonable to me. As a matter of interest, have you observed the difference between boys and girls in this regard. I've no classroom experience but the literature on this strongly suggests that relatively younger girls are not as negatively affected as boys


  • Registered Users Posts: 4,305 ✭✭✭Chuchoter


    5 definitely. If he was a girl then fine, but I know loads of kids round that age and the difference between a 5 year old girl and a 5 year old boy is actually so big in terms of language/concentration. You could talk to a girl for ages, but a boy the same age can't really string a sentence together, so I can't think a 4 year old boy would have that great a time unless they were quite ahead.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,170 ✭✭✭E.T.


    celtanu - it's mainly boys who have had trouble settling in to my class when they started at a young 4. I have had one or two girls who wouldn't have been at the same level as the others socially, despite being fairly bright. With the girls it just showed up as not being able to cope with basic skills eg using a scissors, putting on/taking off coat etc. What does worry me with very young girls being sent in (ie children who only turned 4 over the summer) is that they seem to be slightly isolated socially, whereas the boys don't really notice this at all and will happily play on. With boys it seems to show more as a difficulty paying attention for any length of time. This is just what I've observed in general.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2 misterjeany


    This book on the subject is pretty handy:

    http://www.omahonys.ie/catalog/ready-for-school-p-87643.html


  • Registered Users Posts: 4 maisey123


    As an experienced infant teacher, I would advise that your child start school when aged 5 yr 2 months. I have had the experience of teaching children who were aged just over 4 yr and in my opinion aged 4yr 2 mth is much too young. A year can make an enormous difference to you child's maturity as well as emotional, social and intellectual development. Our school policy advises parents to send their children to our school when their children are at least 4 years and 6 months of age. I strongly believe that this is the best decision for children. Children that are emotionally ready for school will settle in with greater ease and will enjoy the transition into Primary school. They will also enjoy the independence that develops with same. Hope this helps
    regards, maisey123


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  • Registered Users Posts: 242 ✭✭justo


    This book on the subject is pretty handy:

    http://www.omahonys.ie/catalog/ready-for-school-p-87643.html


    Thanks. I have ordered this from the library.


  • Registered Users Posts: 44 martin451


    i agree with 5 yeasr 2 months much better idea !


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