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Junior Cert Science Experiments

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  • Registered Users Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭kevin12345


    :)What experiments is every1 learning??

    My teacher said these:
    Food tests
    Ecology
    Micro Organisms in soil and air
    Preparation of Carbon Dioxide
    Titration
    Density of block
    Energy (heat) conversions
    Heat
    Light
    Magnetic Field
    Conductivity
    :D


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,988 ✭✭✭Monsieur Folie


    My advice, if you're and average-good student who usually does well in class and stuff, skim through 'em all.

    Science is hard to predict, so its better to have a good grasping of them all than a brilliant grasping of one or two and not knowing the rest.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,347 ✭✭✭Closed ac


    kevin12345 wrote: »
    My teacher said these:
    Food tests
    Ecology
    Micro Organisms in soil and air
    Preparation of Carbon Dioxide
    Titration
    Density of block
    Energy (heat) conversions
    Heat
    Light
    Magnetic Field
    Conductivity
    :D

    All of them??


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭kevin12345


    DKZ wrote: »
    All of them??

    No :pac: Those are what COULD come up! Not all on the same paper, only to know them all.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭kevin12345


    These are the Biology Experiments my teacher predicts. These are summarised to fit the small number of lines they give in the exam.


    Experiments
    Startch: Add some water to the food and mash it into a paste. Add iodine to the food. R: Turns blue black if startch is present.
    Sugar: Add some water to food and mash it up into a paste. Add Benedict’s solution to the food. Heat gently in a water bath. R: The food turns red-orange.
    Proteins: Add some food to water and mash it up into a paste. Add some sodium hydroxide and copper sulphate solution. Heat gently. R: The food turns violet in colour.
    Fats: Squeeze food in a piece of brown paper. Leave to dry. R: A translucent spot appears.

    Absorption of water by roots: Set up apparatus as shown (plant with root in test tube and a control test tube) Leave A and B for a week. Note the water level in each tube. R: The water level in A falls due to uptake of water in roots.
    Transpiration: Place growing plant in soil. Seal of the roots by tying a bag around the stem. Leave the plant in a warm place for several hours. R: There are water droplets on the inside of the bag. Test the water with cobalt chloride paper. Colour change = blue to pink.
    Upward movement of water through stem: Set up apparatus as shown (celery stem in a beaker with water). Add food colouring to the water and leave for about two or three days. Take the celery out and examine the veins. Cut across the stem and leaf. R: Coloured water is present in the stem and leaves. It has travelled up the stem.
    To show starch is produced by photosynthesis: Set up apparatus as shown. Boil the leaf in water to kill the leaf and break open the cells. Boil the leaf in alcohol to remove the chlorphyll. Rinse with water to soften the leaf. Add iodine to the leaf. R: If starch is present, the leaf turns blue/black. If not = yellow/brown.
    Phototropism: Place the plant in the box as shown. Leave the plant for a few days with light shining through a hole. R: The plant grows toward the light
    Geotropism[/B]: Soak some bean seeds overnight. Plant some bean seeds in a moist cotton wool. Plant some the right way up, some upside down and sideways. Leave for a week. R: No matter which way they are planted , the roots grow down and the stems grows up.
    Germination: Set up four test tubes as shown. Place test tubes 1, 2 and 3 in a warm spot (20oC) and leave test tube 4 in a fridge. Leave them for a few days. Do not allowed the cotton wool to dry up. R: The seeds in test tube 1 germinated. C: Air, water and heat are conditions need for germination.

    Micro-organisms in soil: Prepare three sterile Petri dishes containing nutrient agar. Seal one dish. Leave the second dish exposed to the air for some minutes. Seal it. Use a sterile rod to place some soil on the third dish. Incubate the three dishes at 37oC for seventy-two hours. R: Shiny patches of bacteria and fungi will appear as colonies on the dish that was exposed to the air and which contained the soil. C: Air and soil contains micro-organisms.


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  • Registered Users Posts: 65 ✭✭fiestapower


    nil :(


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 2,347 ✭✭✭Closed ac


    kevin12345 wrote: »
    No :pac: Those are what COULD come up! Not all on the same paper, only to know them all.

    Oh, right! kk! :pac:


  • Registered Users Posts: 1 Ava_8844


    I was wondering could you maybe answer the following questions

    1.What is the function of the agar in the petri dish?
    2.Why were the petri dishes p[laced in an incubator?
    3.Describe and explain the appearance of the agar in the exposed dish after b3 days?


  • Moderators, Category Moderators, Education Moderators Posts: 27,196 CMod ✭✭✭✭spurious


    Come on, you did the experiments, you write the report.

    Zombie thread closed.


This discussion has been closed.
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