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How to get on & off the train without the train stopping

  • 14-06-2010 10:22pm
    #1
    Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 31,254 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dolanbaker


    http://softhunder.blogspot.com/2010/04/train-that-never-stops-at-station.html
    A brilliant new Chinese train innovation - get on & off the bullet train without the train stopping. VERY COOL CONCEPT !

    No time is wasted. The bullet train is moving all the time. If there are 30 stations between Beijing and Guangzhou , just stopping and accelerating again at each station will waste both energy and time.

    A mere 5 min stop per station (elderly passengers cannot be hurried) will result in a total loss of 5 min x 30 stations or 2.5 hours of train journey time!

    How it works (view the movie - in mandarin though!):


    1. For those who are boarding the train : The passengers at a station embarks onto to a connector cabin way before the train even arrives at the station. When the train arrives, it will not stop at all. It just slows down to pick up the connector cabin which will move with the train on the roof of the train.

    While the train is still moving away from the station, those passengers will board the train from the connector cabin mounted on the train's roof. After fully unloading all its passengers, the cabin connector cabin will be moved to the back of the train so that the next batch of outgoing passengers who want to alight at the next station will board the connector cabin at the rear of the train roof.

    2. For those who are getting off: As stated after fully unloading all its passengers, the cabin connector cabin will be moved to the back of the train so that the next batch of outgoing passengers who want to alight at the next station will board the connector cabin at the rear of the train roof. When the train arrives at the next station, it will simply drop the whole connector cabin at the station itself and leave it behind at the station. The outgoing passengers can take their own time to disembark at the station while the train had already left. At the same time, the train will pick up the incoming embarking passengers on another connector cabin in the front part of the train's roof. So the train will always drop one connector cabin at the rear of its roof and pick up a new connector cabin in the front part of the train's roof at each station.

    Can't see it ever being built, but an interesting concept!
    Tagged:


Comments

  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,701 ✭✭✭ Offy


    I think its a great idea and with a little work I see no reason why it could not be built.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 31,254 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dolanbaker


    First thought after posting that, was the old Post office trackside mailbag collection system. :D



  • Closed Accounts Posts: 1,701 ✭✭✭ Offy


    dolanbaker wrote: »
    First thought after posting that, was the old Post office trackside mailbag collection system. :D


    That might prove to be an insurance nightmare!


  • Moderators, Science, Health & Environment Moderators Posts: 4,408 Mod ✭✭✭✭ spacetweek


    dolanbaker wrote: »
    http://softhunder.blogspot.com/2010/04/train-that-never-stops-at-station.html

    Can't see it ever being built, but an interesting concept!
    Why can't you see it ever being built?? China has almost unlimited resources. As recently as about 2007, they were making $400 billion a year on foreign trade. To put that in perspective, motorway costs around $3M/km in China - so you could build a phenomenal 133,000 kilometres of motorway per year! High speed trains are much more expensive alright, but still. Absolutely nothing stopping them doing this and they've already in any case planned 50,000 k's of high speed rail by 2020. They'll achieve that easily, they always achieve everything they plan at lightning speed.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 31,254 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dolanbaker


    spacetweek wrote: »
    Why can't you see it ever being built?? China has almost unlimited resources.

    China is buying up resources from where ever it can to "catch up" with the west, they're racing against the clock to build everything before recources become scarce.

    The reason I don't see this being built is simply the fact that doubling up sections of track for fast and slow trains with intermediate stations with "island" platforms to allow passingers to switch trains would be more practicable.


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  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,738 ✭✭✭✭ corktina


    boarding a moving trian is novel but disambarking used to be a common practise in the old days....a "slip" coach or coaches at the rear of the train would be uncoupled and coast to a station....operated right up to the 1950s and i never heard of an accident.


  • Moderators, Home & Garden Moderators, Social & Fun Moderators Posts: 31,254 Mod ✭✭✭✭ dolanbaker


    corktina wrote: »
    boarding a moving trian is novel but disambarking used to be a common practise in the old days....a "slip" coach or coaches at the rear of the train would be uncoupled and coast to a station....operated right up to the 1950s and i never heard of an accident.

    Yep! Back in the days of steam and brake cars at the end of the train.


  • Registered Users Posts: 1,578 ✭✭✭ alan4cult


    Would the passengers in the connector cabin that want to board the train not experience severe acceleration as the train collects them?

    Perhaps some of this acceleration could be stopped by allowing the cabin to coast to the rear of the train as it appears in the video?


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,738 ✭✭✭✭ corktina


    seeing as the future for rail is AC electric with overhead power collection, this idea is pure nonsense....the Starship Enterprise and its Warp drive is more likely


  • Registered Users Posts: 3,063 ✭✭✭ JohnC.


    Did you not see the overhead power in the video then?


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  • Registered Users Posts: 7,852 ✭✭✭ SeanW


    Meh, it just looks like a bad epsiode of Star Trek in Chinese.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 ✭✭✭✭ Judgement Day


    corktina wrote: »
    boarding a moving trian is novel but disambarking used to be a common practise in the old days....a "slip" coach or coaches at the rear of the train would be uncoupled and coast to a station....operated right up to the 1950s and i never heard of an accident.

    There were several serious accidents in the UK involving 'slip' coaches including one where the free wheeling slip carriage caught up with the rest of the train which had stopped in fog. I seem to remember that some Dublin/Cork (?) trains had a slip carriage for the Tullow branch which was slipped approaching Sallins. As can be imagined the operation called for serious route knowledge by all concerned. What on earth would the Health & Safety people to say about it today? :D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,738 ✭✭✭✭ corktina


    can you give a date and location for that (any) slip coach accident as I have never heard o f such a thing which surpises me...


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,738 ✭✭✭✭ corktina


    There were several serious accidents in the UK involving 'slip' coaches including one where the free wheeling slip carriage caught up with the rest of the train which had stopped in fog. I seem to remember that some Dublin/Cork (?) trains had a slip carriage for the Tullow branch which was slipped approaching Sallins. As can be imagined the operation called for serious route knowledge by all concerned. What on earth would the Health & Safety people to say about it today? :D

    what would they say? well the only part of the operation that should have raised eyebrows is that once slipped, you effectively have two trains in one section. Needless to say there were stringent safety procedures included in the all-imporrtant rule book. The impression can be given that the coach is just set adrift, i think its important to stress that slip coaches were under the control of a senior conductor and had their own vacuum reservoirs for braking.


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 ✭✭✭✭ Judgement Day


    Very informative piece on 'slip' carriages here: http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r134.html

    Pretty sure that the slip carriage accident was in LTC Rolt's "Red for Danger" book which I read years ago but sadly I no longer have a copy.

    51FPDPTCP6L._SL500_AA300_.jpg


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,738 ✭✭✭✭ corktina


    Very informative piece on 'slip' carriages here: http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r134.html

    Pretty sure that the slip carriage accident was in LTC Rolt's "Red for Danger" book which I read years ago but sadly I no longer have a copy.

    51FPDPTCP6L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

    i have that and several other books on accidents....i dont recall a slip coach accident


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 13,549 ✭✭✭✭ Judgement Day


    Here's another link for you: http://www.transportdiversions.com/publicationshow.asp?pubid=1286

    - see Chapter 8 -Slip Coach Accidents. Railway accidents used to be a special interest of mine, indeed I had a lot of material ready for a book but the two recent Irish ones meant I mothballed mine for another day/decade. :D


  • Closed Accounts Posts: 17,738 ✭✭✭✭ corktina


    o how sad am I...just ordered that...an area I would like to know more of...thx for the heads-up


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